jump to navigation

Jim Korpi July 11, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags: ,
1 comment so far


Grave Digger. Cheshire, Ohio 2007

Jim Korpi started his path in photography during his university years when he worked part time as a writer/photographer at the Portsmouth Herald in Portsmouth, NH. Following his graduation from the University of New Hampshire with a degree in English/Journalism, Jim served as a Visual Journalism fellow at the Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Florida. He later joined the Valley News in West Lebanon, New Hampshire as a photography intern. In addition to Jim’s work with community newspapers, he has done freelance assignments for the The New York Times, The Washington Post and Associated Press. In September of 2005, Jim received a Fulbright Scholarship to Jordan where he worked on a documentary photographic project and studied Arabic. His photographs were exhibited by the city of Amman, Jordan, in a large installation at the city’s cultural square. Presently, Jim is working on his master’s degree in the School of Visual Communications at Ohio University.

About the Photograph:

Dave Stanley has been digging graves at the Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire, Ohio, for the past year. He was laid off from the Community Action Center and was asked to take the cemetery job. The town of Cheshire has been bought out by the Gavin Power Plant. Some older community members will stay until their end. Stanley says once the older folks die off in the town the cemetery will die with them. This photograph is part “Coal and Consequences”, Jim’s long term personal project about coal and it’s effects on the environment, people and communities.

Jesse Marlow July 10, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
Tags:
add a comment


Indigenous Football, Australia

Jesse Marlow is a documentary photographer based in Melbourne, Australia. Over the last eight years he has worked for a range of local and international magazines, newspapers and commercial clients. His works are held in public and private collections across Australia. In 2002, he was the inaugural winner of the Australian Hasselblad X-Pan Masters competition. In 2005 he published a book of street photographs titled “Wounded”. In 2006 he was selected to participate in the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam. He is a member of both the international street photographers collective in-public.com and Oculi, Australia’s leading documentary photography agency. His work is distributed throughout Europe by Agence Vu.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photo at a community called Papunya which is in the Central Australian desert. It’s from my book Centre Bounce: Football from Australia’s Heart which documents the game of Australian Rules Football as it’s played by Indigenous Australians living in the remote Northern Territory. I worked on this project on and off for 5 years and this was one of the last photos I shot for the series. Minutes before the game started this young boy appeared, and set off walking around the perimeter of the ground with a cup of lime marking out the boundary line. I followed him around the whole ground but it was as he returned to his starting point that the scene began to work as a photo. It’s one of my favorite images from the book because I feel it perfectly depicts the grass-roots style of football being played in the spectacular landscape of the Australian desert.

Danny Ghitis and Celia Tobin July 9, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in India.
Tags:
add a comment

Danny Ghitis and Celia Tobin, both 25, are documentary photographers and multimedia producers who believe in journalism as a catalyst for social change. They met at the University of Florida where they recently earned their journalism degrees. After completing various newspaper internships, they traveled to India in 2007 to collaborate on social issue stories, including a project on Indian public health care through a burn ward in Varanasi. Though they value pursuing individual freelance projects, they look forward to combining their efforts again in the future. Between them, they have been recognized by the Hearst Photojournalism Awards, the Northern Short Course, College Photographer of the Year, Associated Press and NPPA clip contests. They will soon be based out of New York City.

About the Photograph:

Dr. A.K. Pradan moves on to the next patient after briefly checking 13-year-old Chandni Gupta (in bed) as her mother, Suroj, looks for more answers to her questions. With the hospital understaffed and overcrowded, Pradan moves quickly in order to see approximately 150 patients in various wards. Though his specialization is plastic surgery, he works to cover other specialist staff vacancies, such as neurology. While India’s private health care improves, government spending on public health is among the lowest in the world: about $4 a year per person. Shri Shiv Prasad hospital in the ancient city of Varanasi is overcrowded and short on resources, like most government-run medical facilities in India. Every day, poor families from surrounding villages come seeking care for relatives that have suffered severe burns. Most victims are women burned in kitchen accidents. Others are victims of dowry-related violence.

Kosuke Okahara July 8, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China.
Tags:
add a comment


Abandoned Leprosy Village. China, 2007

Born in 1980, Kosuke Okahara began his professional career at age 23, after his college graduation. Since the beginning of his career, he has been devoting himself to the theme of “Ibasyo” which refers, in Japanese, to “People’s physical and emotional space where they can exist”, or “Inner-peace of the people.” His  recent work  deals with people who are involved in illegal activities at the bottom of society in Colombia, and young Japanese people who are struggling with self-injury. He has covered stories in Asia, Africa, and South America. His works have been published in TIME.com, Newsweek Japan, PHOTO, AERA, Playboy Japan, Photografica, ASAHI Camera, among others. His photos have also been exhibited at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Nikon Gallery, Tokyo, and the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand. He is a member photographer of Agence VU.

About the Photograph:

“This is a photo story of the daily life of former leprosy patients who exist in the shade of China’s recent economic boom. Though leprosy is an old disease that is 100% curable by medicines, there are over 600 leprosy villages in southern provinces of China housing over 40,000 ex-leprosy patients. In the villages, some people remain disabled but they are not effected by leprosy anymore. When multi-drug therapy became available in China in the 80’s, people recovered from the disease. However, these people still live in villages isolated in remote areas because of the long-lasting discrimination against the the disease. In many villages people do not have an access to clean water and electricity, and live in very difficult conditions. They earn between nothing and $50 per month from the government. Like the poor farming villages they remain outside of China’s recent visable economic growth.”

Justyna Mielnikiewicz July 7, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Georgia.
Tags: ,
add a comment


Young Russian tourists visit an Orthodox monastery. Abkhazia, 2007

Justyna Mielnikiewicz was born in Poland in 1973 and has been working as a professional photographer for seven years. She graduated from Jagiellonian University in Krakow with a Masters in New Media and Culture Management. After finishing university she began to work as photojournalist with the daily newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza. In 2001 she became a freelance photographer and moved to Tbilisi, Georgia to work on a long term project on the South Caucasus. The project was awarded an honorable mention for the 2003 Dorothea Lange/ R. Taylor Prize and received a grant from the European Culture Foundation. Her photographs have appeared in: Newsweek, Paris Match, The New York Times, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, among others and were screened at Arles in 2005. Her work is distributed by Cosmos Agency , World Picture News and Eve Photographers.

About the Photograph:

Every summer Russian tourists arrive by the thousands at a Black Sea resort area they regard as their own. They come with urges shared by tourists the world over, for sun and drink and days lounging on the shore. Their destination is officially Georgia. But in their minds it is not Georgia at all. It is Abkhazia, one of the thorniest issues dividing Russia and Western-supported Georgia in the volatile Caucasus. It is one of four small regions in the southwestern reaches of the former Soviet Union whose status, 15 years on, remains unresolved. The others — South Ossetia, Nagorno-Karabakh and Transnistria — are in Georgia, Azerbaijan and Moldova, respectively. Photographers Journal: Abkhazia.

George Georgiou July 4, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Turkey.
Tags:
add a comment


Martyrs’ Day. Gillipoli, Turkey

George Georgiou (b. 1961, England) is a freelance photographer represented by Panos Pictures (UK) and Signatures (France). He has photographed extensively in the Balkans, Eastern Europe and Turkey for the last decade, living and working in Serbia, Greece, and, for the last four years in Istanbul. Georgiou’s work has focused on people caught between communities, cultures, and ideologies. He recently finished a book project about Turkey to be published by Mets & Schilts, called Fault Lines: East to West. His awards include two World Press Photo prizes for “The Serbs” 1st Portrait stories 2003 and “Flour War, 2nd Arts stories 2005” a Pictures of the Year International first prize for “Istanbul Bombs,” 2004 and a Nikon Press Award UK for best photo essay 2000. He recently moved back to London and started a new book project looking at the topography and migrations of London.

About the Photograph:

“This Photograph was taken on Martyrs’ day in Gallipoli, Western Turkey. I was really surprised when I arrived at Gallipoli because I had always associated Gallipoli with the failed Allied campaign against the Ottomans during the first World War and the image of English, French, Australians and New Zealand veterans commemorating their dead on Anzac day. For Turkey, Gallipoli is perceived as one of the most important defining moments in their history and laid the grounds for the Turkish war of Independence and the foundation of the Turkish Republic. They celebrate this victory, which cost the lives of over a 100,000 people, on March 18, marking the day in 1915 when the Allies launched their naval attack on the Dardanelles. For me the significance of this event in relation to the work I was doing about contemporary Turkey was how the central position of how the Military and Ataturk have continued to play in modern Turkey and in many ways is best symbolized on this day.”

Sven Torfinn July 3, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mozambique.
Tags:
add a comment


Mozambique, Maputo, November 2004

Sven Torfinn, (Belgium, b.1971) studied photography at the Academy for Fine Arts Sint Joost in Breda, The Netherlands from 1990 to 1995. After a small stray off to fashion photography, he worked as a freelancer for Dutch media. In 1999 Sven Torfinn moved to Namibia where he briefly worked for Reuters and contributed to a countrywide HIV/Aids campaign in corporation with UNICEF. In 2000 Sven Torfinn based himself in Nairobi, Kenya, from where he travels all over the continent, working on assignments for Dutch and International media and NGO’s. Among them De Volkskrant, Elsevier, Economist, The Guardian, Observer, Time, Medicine Sans Frontiers, WHO, Action Aid. His work is represented in Europe by Hollandse Hoogte and Panos Pictures in London. His awards include: World Press Photo (2005), Zilveren Camera Awards (2003, 2005) and the Dick Scherpenzeel prize (2006).

About the Photograph:

After his first encounter with East and Central Africa, Sven “concluded” that just as correspondents, photographers should base themselves in a particular region, instead of traveling around the globe from one hot spot to the other. By living on a continent like Africa the chance is bigger that you develop an understanding for it, and the produced pictures could start showing something more than the already known image of wars, famines and other disasters. For this image Sven comments: “This a continent of young people. They are in the majority, they don’t have the lead yet, but soon…” in other words Sven is hopeful.

Rocco Rorandelli July 2, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags: ,
3 comments


E. and his Son at Home. Yonkers, New York, 2007

Rocco Rorandelli was born in Florence in 1973. His interest in photography commenced at an early age, but it wasn’t until completing his doctoral studies in Biology that he decided to commit to his lifelong passion. He has complted projects in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. His photos have been published in magazines such as D di Repubblica, Vanity Fair, Corriere della Sera Magazine, as well as shown in exhibits in Europe and the U.S. His work has also been shown in numerous advertising, fund raising and awareness campaigns for various social (Terre des hommes, UniCOOP) and academic institutions such as Cornell University and Sarah Lawrence College. He is a founding member of the Terra Project photo collective and is represented by Grazia Neri.

About the Photograph:

“This work on the Latin-American community in New York had a very slow start. It took me several weeks to get this close to someone, to be invited in their home. It wasn’t a matter of shyness. I simply did not feel right asking as I could tell they did not feel inviting. I often see this happening, trust building all in a sudden, when you don’t expect it. I was supposed to fly to New Orleans that weekend, and I had not yet accessed the private circle of friends of any of the workers I had met. That Friday night, a snowstorm reached NYC and the next day my flight from La Guardia was postponed for three days. That’s how I found myself in Yorkers early in the morning, and how I was invited the next day for a Dominican and Mexican lunch. I missed something in New Orleans, I gained memories and closeness in Yonkers, this is one of the several outcomes of changing plans.” (more…)

Nicole Tung July 1, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Kosovo.
Tags: , ,
add a comment


Albanians at border crossing between Kosovo and Serbia. 2008

Originally from Hong Kong, Nicole Tung is now based in New York where she is in her third year at New York University, double majoring in Journalism and History. She intends to go into TV broadcast and documentary, and is currently interning at ABC News, contributing to Humanus, NYU’s Human Rights Journal, and attempting the freelance life on the side. Recently, Nicole was awarded the NYU DURF Grant which supported her trip to go back to Kosovo in December 2007.

About the Photograph:

“These Albanians are on their way to an enclave which is located in Serbian territory, and each time they want to go between Kosovo and Serbia, they have to cross a border checkpoint. The enclave they live in is called the Presevo Valley– dominated by Albanians, but legally under the Serbs. I feel like this photo is representative of the Albanians there. A month before Kosovo was set to declare its independence from Serbia, the former province underwent a subtle transition to prepare itself for the long-awaited day. Kosovo spent eight years under UN administration, following the war in 1999 in which NATO intervened on the Albanians’ behalf to drive out Yugoslav forces. Life there is marked by frequent water and power outages, and many socio-economic problems, and while Serbs remained uncertain over their future, Kosovar Albanians were confident that they would have their own country within the first few months of 2008.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,921 other followers