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Carl Kiilsgaard June 29, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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The White Family

Carl Kiilsgaard (b.1986,United States) is currently a student at Western Kentucky University where, if  everything goes as planned, he will graduate in 2010. He has interned at Bucks County (Pennsylvania) Times, the Napa (California) Register, and the Palm Beach (Florida) Post. Carl has used his camera as a tool to meet people, experience life, and he hopes to one day affect social change in a positive way. His work has been recognized by POYi, BOP, the Alexia Foundation, PDN, Canon, and the Magenta Foundation. Carl was one of Getty Images Reportage’s Emerging Talent picks in 2008.

About the Photograph:

“This is a picture I took last summer from a project I have been working on entitled The White Family. We had walked down the holler to talk with some neighbors when the kids began playing in the front yard while the adults talked in the background. This project is very near and dear to my heart and I consider the subjects as part of my own family now. The experiences I’ve shared with them have shaped both my world view and taught me many things about compassion and the acceptance of cultures different from my own. In spite of many setbacks, they have been able to persevere because of their strong family bond.”

Ambroise Tézenas June 26, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in India.
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Mumbai, India 5 am, 2006

Ambroise Tézenas (b. 1972, France)  graduated from the Applied Arts School of Vevey, Switerland in 1994. First based in London and then in Paris, his work appears in various publications such as The New York Time Magazine, The Independent Magazine, Newsweek and Le Monde. From 2002, Ambroise Tézenas has essentially devoted his time to the creation of a personal work on landscapes. In 2004, he co-founded Think Pictures, an independent photography agency. He  photographed in Beijing from 2001 to 2005, witnessing the changes taking place before the Olympics, later published as a book that won the Leica European Publisher’s Award for Photography in 2006. His photographs are represented by Galerie Philippe Chaume in Paris.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken at the time I had finished a project on Beijing and had spent quite a few nights walking in the Chinese Capital.  I went to Mumbai for a week not for a particular story but to experience night time elsewhere. I rarely do that as I am usually on assignments or working on a specific  project. I had been to India a few times before but it was my first time  in Mumbai. It was  two o’clock in the morning and I was walking in South Mumbai. It was very peaceful. It  was my first night there, when I saw a taxi driver sleeping in his car with the blue light on. The exposure was about 30 seconds.  I shot it on 4×5 film. The man didn’t wake up. I kept walking till 5 am. Experiencing the silence of megalopolis is therapy for me.”

Martin Roemers June 24, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Holland.
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Frederick Lennart Bentley, b.1924, England

Martin Roemers (b.1962, The Netherlands) received his formal training in photography at the Academy of Arts in Enschede (The Netherlands).  He has worked in Afghanistan, the Balkans, Russia,  Ukraine, Belarus, Mexico, Eritrea, Ruanda, Syria, India etc. The themes of Martin Roemers vary from the final days of production of the Trabant, the car symbol of the DDR, to portraits of people who were blinded as a result of World War II in “The Eyes of War”, and the deserted and guilty landscape of the Cold War in “Relics of the Cold War”. With his portraits of World War II veterans, he won a prize in World Press Photo 2006. A book of the project: ‘The Never-Ending War’,  was published  by QV publishers, The Netherlands. He is represented by Panos Pictures in the UK and Laif in Germany.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph of Frederick Lennart Bentley is from my project called The Never-Ending War: portraits and interviews of WWII veterans from Germany, Russia, UK, Poland, USA.”

“I was blinded by a German grenade during a night patrol near Caen in Normandy. My comrades left me behind. That was how it was: you didn’t help the wounded. You had to look after yourself. I managed to reach my own lines on my own. If the Germans had found me, they would have certainly shot me. You don’t give the wounded a bed, you bury them. I would have done the same myself. People who weren’t in the war can’t understand that. You’re living with death 24 hours a day. The war was over for me. I worked for 33 years at the Leyland factories as a mechanical engineer. I inspected machines by touch. I had work, I married and I had four children. I had a good life after the war.”

Daryl Peveto June 22, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Birthday Boy from the series “American Nomads”

Daryl Peveto is a freelance photographer and videographer with a passion for social documentary storytelling. Over the last few years he has worked on  issues ranging from American nomads to the black market economies of Peru to active octogenarians. From these images he was accepted to the prestigious Eddie Adams Workshop in 2006 and has since been recognized by Photo District News, College Photographer of the Year, the Missouri Photo Workshop, the National Press Photographers Association and Sportsshooter.com. His clients include The New York Times, The FADER, San Diego Union-Tribune, ABC television, and MSNBC. Daryl is currently based in Southern California.

About the Photograph:

“A central goal of the American Dream is to one day own your own home.  Yet our beginnings were forged out of another, antithetical idea: that of movement and searching for self-determination. Today this idea still exists, but far away from our neatly manicured suburban homes and out of view of the mainstream. In the United States, large communities exist which have turned their backs on the idea of settling down, opting for a nomadic life. One such community is Slab City, located on the Salton Sea in southern California. In this photo, Willie Reynolds cools off with his weekly bath in a pool that he borrowed from his six dogs. The summers in the Slabs reach as much as 120 degrees. Willie was given arm floaties for his birthday. He says, “They are good to keep me from drowning.” Adding, “today is my birthday, so I wanted to take a bath for my party.” Willie’s friends threw him a barbecue and surprised him with a cake.

“On a side note, I missed the latter part of Willie’s birthday party due to being sick. When I went to see him the next day to apologize, he asked me if I wanted some cake. He then told me that he waited to blow out the candles and serve the cake until I could be there to celebrate with him. It was an incredibly touching moment for me.”

KayLynn Deveney June 19, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Wales.
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Edith and Leonard Crawshaw, Wales

KayLynn Deveney (b. 1967, USA) began working on intimate photographic stories while she was a staff photographer at the Albuquerque Tribune. After nine years at the newspaper KayLynn returned to graduate school and completed both an MA in documentary photography and a practice-based Ph.D. in photography at the University of Wales, Newport. Her work has been exhibited in the USA and Britain and is held in permanent collections including those of The Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, Illinois; Light Work in Syracuse, New York; and the Portland Art Museum in Oregon. KayLynn’s first photographic book, The Day-to-Day Life of Albert Hastings, was published by Princeton Architectural Press in August 2007 and  has won numerous awards including  an official selection for the Arles Contemporary Book Prize. In December 2008 KayLynn received a grant from the prestigious Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation.

About the Photograph:

“I began photographing Edith and Leonard Crawshaw shortly after they moved from their flat in Wales into a nursing home. After almost 70 years of marriage, the Crawshaws found themselves spending the vast majority of their day sitting together, eating together and sleeping together in this one room. Edith once said to me, “When we’re sitting here I feel as if we are in a waiting room. You know, that is where we are, of course.” My interests about aging stem from my relationship with my grandmother, and my investigations about growing old and facing death have taken me on an unexpected and important journey. In this work my continued concerns, questions and fears are stirred in with Edith and Len’s daily experience. Accompanying my images of the Crawshaws are edited entries from a diary I kept during the project that help to tell a collective story about the ways we approached both our photographic relationship and our friendship. This work offers some insight into the small space that became “home” for Edith and Len as well as a glimpse inside the photographic negotiation of such a project.”

Jon Lowenstein June 17, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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From the series “Chicagoland”

Jon Lowenstein (b.1970, United States) specializes in long-term, in-depth documentary photographic projects which question the status quo. He attended the University of Iowa and graduated with a degree in English in 1993. Jon has been documenting the South Side Chicago community for the past eight years and his recent work includes stories from Central America. His awards include a 2008 Alicia Patterson Fellow and garnering the 2007 Getty Award for Editorial Images. He also received a 2007 World Press Photo Award, a 2007 USC Annenberg Institute for Justice and Journalism Fellowship, the 2005 NPPA New America Award, Nikon Sabbatical Grant, and Fuji Community Awareness Award. He participated in the Open Society Institute’s Moving Walls Exhibition and was a finalist for the 2006 W. Eugene Smith Award.

About the Photograph:

“Chicago is not typically designated in dream-like terms.  If anything, its nostalgia is evoked through a mythology of its icy literalness. It is, after all, the poster-city of American industrial power, sweet home to ruthless gangsters and red-faced politicians. For years, the ‘Second City’ has been overlooked in favor of the more urbane New York and the glitterati of Los Angeles. Chicagoland is a photographic dream journey through what many term The Most American City.   Obama’s election to the presidency reflects the straight-thinking values historically associated with Chicago and in doing so, brings the world’s gaze to its lakeshores.  Unlike the older east coast cities with their Anglo colonial roots, Chicago has always been the working immigrant’s kind of town. The adage that to understand Chicago is to understand America has perhaps never been so much the case.”

Kim Badawi June 15, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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From the “Taqwacores” Project, 2007

Kim Badawi (b. 1980, France) studied at l’ Ecole Superieure des Arts Graphiques, in Paris. He  graduated with a BFA in 2003, from the School of Visual Arts, in New York. While working as a photo assistant at Magnum Photos and Time Inc. he participated in various group exhibitions in both Manhattan and Washington DC. In 2005, he covered the plight of surviving refugee families from Mississippi to Texas during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. He recently graduated from the Documentary and Photo-journalism program at ICP while interning at Contact Press Inmages. Kim’s work appeared in 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers (PowerHouse Books, 2008) and The Taqwacores- A history of the American Muslim punk genre by  (PowerHouse Books, 2009).

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken on assignment for Rolling Stone in the basement of a punk house known as La Casa Malidita in Chicago during the first ever Taqwa Tour in 2007.  It shows guitarist Shahjehan Khan of the Kominas’ – a Taqwacore band from Boston- being fed a freshly seared enchilada by former singer of Dia Critical, Omar Waqar – a Taqwacore band from Washington DC.  Taqwacore, encompasses a wide variety of musical styles, orientations, and includes individuals from different religious and cultural backgrounds.  Although this photo never ran in Rolling Stone I believe it encapsulates the notion of cross cultural acceptance and diversity.”

Richard Wainwright June 12, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mongolia.
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The coldest capital city in the world. Ulaan Baatar, Mongolia, 2008

Richard Wainwright (b.1973, England) received a degree in Documentary Photography at University of Wales, Newport Richard has been reporting on news and humanitarian issues. He has been a senior staff photographer with the Jersey Evening Post since 2002 and also works closely with aid agencies on assignment documenting their activities, writing stories and producing multimedia packages. Since 2003, he has been filing news pictures for Corbis. His work has been widely published including Newsweek, The Sunday Times, The Telegraph, The Independent and The Irish Independent. His work has resulted in numerous exhibitions in Jersey, London and Australia.

About the Photograph:

“This assignment to Mongolia was shot for an upcoming exhibition in Jersey for the Amnesty Human Rights Film Festival. The trip resulted in two seperate stories and multimedia presentations Mongolia: Urbanisation & Effects and Mongolia: Surviving the Winter. This picture shows Munkhbat & Altangeret (both 15) who have lived in a manhole together for over three years under the streets of Ulaan Baatar, the coldest capital city in the world. I spent time with them throughout the weeks and witnessed what a tough, lonely and violent existence they have to endure in temperatures reaching -40c. They were forced into this situation by divorced and deceased parents but they still hope and strive for a better future. Despite the harsh conditions they haven’t succumbed to the cheap vodka like the many other street children.”

Marc Asnin June 10, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Charlie and  Blanca. From the project “Uncle Charlie”

Marc Asnin (b.1964) likes to say he was born and raised in Brooklyn when “Brooklyn was Brooklyn.” Which is his way of saying, not the hip, phony, expensive version that comes to mind these days. If this sounds like he has a chip on his shoulder, think again: it’s on both shoulders. His clients include: The New Yorker, Stern, Life, New York Times Magazine, and many others. His various awards include the Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography in 1993, the Mother Jones International Fund for Documentary Photography in 2000 and the Alicia Patterson Fellowship in 2001. For the past 29 years, Marc has photographed his Uncle Charlie. This body of work was recently selected to appear in the book Blink, published by Phaidon. Marc has also taught at the International Center for Photography and the School of Visual Arts. Uncle Charlie was published by Contrasto. Check out the website for the book here.

About the Photograph:

“The process of taking pictures for the Uncle Charlie project was always very intimate.  This image is a prime example of that intimacy. In this image Charlie was coming out of one of his most anorexic and house-bound states. As he and Blanca were lying down, I was suddenly struck by how similar Charlie looked like his mother, my grandmother, when she was on her deathbed. It was a very eerie feeling to see a sort of death mask on Charlie’s face, one that looked so much like his mother.  One of the major underlying themes of the Uncle Charlie project is the cyclical nature of contemporary society, how poverty and mental illness are often inherited. For Charlie to so closely resemble his dying mother in his current dilapidated state really brought the project full circle for me on both a professional and personal level.”

Dima Gavrysh June 8, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Niger.
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Niger, 2007

Dima  Gavrysh (b.1978, Ukraine) began photographing in 1995. He worked in the United States in 2002 with the Courier – Journal in Louisville, KY and Deseret Morning News in Utah and returned to Europe to document the Orange Revolution in  Kiev. Upon returning to U.S. in January of 2005, Dima settled in New York City and started working with Gamma-Press USA and attended the Eddie Adams Workshop. He currently works for AP, The New York Times, and Bloomberg News. Dima has also worked on various humanitarian projects in Uganda, Senegal, and Niger with Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders) and the United Nations Population Fund. His  work has appeared in National Geographic Adventure, Time, Paris Match, Marie Clair, Popular Photography.

About the Photograph:

“The woman in this photograph was lucky in many ways. In spite of developing and suffering from an obstetric fistula, her baby survived the birth, and she has been successfully treated. Obstetric fistula is a devastating birth-related condition that affects an estimated 50,000-100,000 women each year. Obstetric fistula is a condition that often develops during labor, when a woman cannot get proper medical help. If the obstruction is not interrupted in a timely manner, the prolonged pressure of the baby’s head against the mother’s pelvis cuts off the blood supply to the soft tissues surrounding her bladder, vagina, and rectum, leading to tissue necrosis and incontinence. Usually, the baby dies in the process as well. Incontinence and other health complications are associated with significant social stigma, often leading to the abandonment of the woman by her husband and family.”

Mark Nozeman June 5, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Suriname.
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Brazilian Garimpeiro, Suriname

Mark Nozeman (b 1971, Netherlands) graduated with a  BFA in photography and history from the St. Joost Academy of Fine Arts Breda in Rotterdam. He has worked extensively in Brazil, Latin America and Europe and has exhibited at The National Museum of Ethnology Leiden (NL), The Royal Tropical Museum, Amsterdam and SESC Pompeia, São Paulo, Brazil. Mark’s awards include the Dutch Silver Camera Award for the Cuban interior series. He has received project grants  from  the Anna Cornelis Foundation, Sem Presser Foundation and The Dutch Foundation for Fine Arts. He is currently working on a  long term project about the relationship between individual identity and nationality in the  shifting European identity of emerging generations in post conflict regions. His work has been published in NRC, De Volkskrant, Noticias, Trouw, De Fotograaf, Camera Austria and others.

About the Photograph:

The indigenous population of Surinam were called Marrons until 20 years ago.. They did not exploit gold in their part of the Amazon forest. That all changed after the collapse of the Surinam economy due to conflicts ( ‘De Binnenlandse Oorlog’) between the government and the Jungle Commando of Ronnie Brunswijk. During the past ten years Surinam has been invaded by small well organized Brazilian groups called Garimpeiros (gold diggers). Most of them are living illegally in the forest. They came overland through the Amazon Jungle of Pará and Amapá. Pollution due to mercury is a disaster for the environment. Prostitution, robbery and murder are common. Malaria and sexual transmitted diseases are on the rise”

Christian Cravo June 3, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Haiti.
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Trance, Sodo Waterfall, Haiti

Christian Cravo (b.1974, Brazil) was brought up in an artistic environment in the Brazilian city of Salvador, Bahia. His photographs have been exhibited at the Museu de Arte Moderna da Bahia, the Throckmorton Fine Arts  Gallery, New York, Leica Gallery, and in group shows at SF Camera Works , the Witkin Gallery and the Houston Foto Fest. He has received awards from the Mother Jones Photo Fund for Documentary Photography, a scholarship from the Vitae Foundation and a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship for his research on the Brazilian northeast. His first book “Irredentos” was published in 2000 and in 2005 his second book “Roma noire, ville métisse” was published in Paris by Autrement.

About the Photograph:

“A woman supposedly in a trance at the Sodo waterfall in the central highlands where pilgrims gather in a yearly ceremony to honor African divinities and Gods. This image is part of a larger project called In the Gardens of Eden. As a photographer, I seek to understand people through the images that arise in the course of my journey. I make my eye an instrument that tells a story that is, above all human. In this regard, I see Haiti as the supreme expression of the human essence. This is a society with very unique characteristics – intensely spiritual, replete with symbolism, in which people show their lack of prudishness through the purest of elements.”

Jonathan Hyams June 1, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in South Africa.
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Hamburg, South Africa 2006

Jonathan Hyams (b.1984, Canada, raised in England) studied Documentary Photography at the University of Wales, Newport. His work  has been published in the Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, and the New Internationalist as well as supporting campaigns for the Department For International Development, and Defense Children International. Since graduating in 2007, Jonathan continues to contribute to publications such as the Guardian as well as supporting charities like Christian Aid, Oxfam, and Unicef. In September 2008, Jonathan was awarded Hello Young Photographer of the Year in association with Getty Images and Nikon, for his reportage work on war torn Northern Uganda. His work has been exhibited internationally.

About the Photograph:

“Xolile Wiseman is shown at the start of Anti Retroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS. He is photographed holding his ID booklet as a point of reference. Patients beginning treatment now, are likely to have contracted HIV during the mid to late 90s’ –The ID photographs, reissued in the post apartheid ID booklets, now serve as a poignant snapshot of the subjects before contracting the virus. The ID booklet as a symbol, of the marginalization of blacks under apartheid, resonates deeply as many victims of HIV/AIDS find themselves again marginalised, but perhaps more critically from within their own communities.” (more…)

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