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Gillian Laub May 7, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Israel.
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Madeline and her brother. Israel, 2005

Gillian Laub (b.1975,USA) graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a degree in comparative literature before studying photography at the ICP.  She was selected for the World Press Photo’s Joop Swart Masterclass in 2003 and as the winner of Nikon’s Storyteller Award for her work in the Middle East.  With the support of the Jerome Foundation, Laub’s first monograph Testimony was published by Aperture in 2007 to critical acclaim.  In 2007 Laub was awarded Aperture’s Emerging Artist. She contributes regularly to The New York Times Magazine among many other publications and commissions.  Her work is widely exhibited and collected. She lives in New York and is represented by Bonni Benrubi Gallery and is currently working on a project in the American South.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is from my five year project called Testimony that examines the inhabitants of Jerusalem, Haifa and other locations in the region. My subjects include Israeli Jews. Israeli Arabs, displaced Lebanese and Palestinians- all affected by the geopolitical context. Each image is accompanied by an oral history.”

Madelaine: “I am eighteen years old, and live at home with my mother, father, and five siblings. I love Akko because it is on the water and a mix of many different people live here; Arabs and Jews live together in peace and brotherhood. Maybe the sea helps people feel more calm and peaceful. My two best friends are Jewish and they treat me like a sister, not an enemy. They are going to the army next year. I will do my civil service (Muslims can’t serve in the Israeli army) in a children’s day care. I love children, and I love listening to romantic and classical music. I hate the war in Israel and I would like to live in peace in the future. I believe it’s possible.”

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