jump to navigation

Geoffrey Hiller- Burma Update January 30, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burma, Myanmar.
Tags: ,
comments closed


Moulamain, Burma 2012

Editors Note: I’ll be in Burma till Feb 11th covering events as the country continues to evolve on a daily basis. This is my fifth visit to Burma and it’s day and night compared to six short months ago. There is a good chance I’ll be here longer. Photo-editors can contact me through my website.

Rafael Fabrés January 26, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ecuador.
Tags:
comments closed


Quilotoa Lake, Ecuador 2010

Rafael Fabrés (b.1982, Spain) graduated in Media Communications from the Universidad Europea de Madrid and later studied photography at the Escuela de Fotografía y Centro de Imagen in Madrid. He became involved with  photography in 2006, two months after documenting the north of India and working with an NGO in Kolkata. He is currently based between Haiti and Spain. His clients include Getty Images, and Deutsche Presse Agentur. His work has been published in GEO, Wild Magazine and The Record.

About the Photograph:

“Quilotoa lake is 170 Km from Quito Ecuador on the Panamerican Highway. At almost four thousand meters above sea level, a huge turquoise lagoon of about 3.15 kilometers in diameter, extends into the interior of the crater. To reach it one must descend a steep road of about 440 meters, coming from a small town at the top called Chugchilán. This people of this village live mainly from tourism and local crafts. Manuel Yampa’s family run a small inn in Chugchilán. He and his wife rent mules who bring tourists uphill from the lake. With a height of almost six thousand meters the “Neck of Fire”, as it is called in Quechua, the Cotopaxi is one of the highest active volcanoes in the world.”

Birthe Piontek January 23, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Canada.
Tags:
comments closed


Dawson City, Yukon, Canada 2010

Birthe Piontek
(b.1976, Germany) moved to Canada in 2005 after receiving her MFA from the University of Essen in Communication Design and Photography. Her work has been exhibited internationally at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago and the Museum of Applied Arts in Gera, Germany. In 2008, she was named one of PDN’s 30, and has been a finalist for the Santa Fe Prize in Photography. Her project The Idea of North won the Critical Mass Book Award in 2009, and was published as a monograph in 2011. Birthe’s work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Wired and Die Zeit, among others. She is represented by Charles Guice Contemporary in New York City and Kominek Gallery in Berlin.

About the Photograph:

“This image is part of a project called The Idea of North, a series I shot in Dawson City, Yukon. It deals with a recurrent theme in my photographic work: individuation and the struggles of people to belong and yet to be different at the same time. The fast-paced, anonymous life of the urban environment sometimes offers neither the time nor space for individualization, nor the comforting place needed for belonging. So, for some, the sense of freedom and interdependence intrinsic to a remote, Northern community makes it an idealized symbol of the Promised Land. Dawson City is known for its rough exterior, attracts people interested in an alternative way of living, and, as a former gold mining town, holds its fair share of dark secrets. During my stay there, I met Myriam. Originally from Germany, she moved to the Yukon several years ago. She learned how to build her own log cabin and now enjoys living off the grid, which in her case means neither having running water or electricity, but instead having her own garden and owning a couple of sled dogs. The photo was taken outside her cabin on a long summer evening.”

Kevin Kunishi January 19, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nicaragua.
Tags:
comments closed


Victorio & Marcos Alaniz Benavidez,  Northern Nicaragua 2010

Kevin Kunishi (b.1975, USA) received his BA in History from University of California Santa Barbara in 2001 and his MFA from the Academy of Art University, San Francisco in 2011. Following his undergraduate studies, he traveled for six years, circled the world twice and explored 21 different countries. It was during this time that his fascination for the alchemy of photography flourished and became an all-consuming passion. In 2011 Kevin was awarded first place in The International Photography Awards and was the recipient of The Blue Earth Prize for Best Project Photography. His work has also been recognized by The New Yorker, American Photo Magazine, the New York Photo Festival, PDN, CMYK magazine, Photographer’s Forum and Prix de la Photographie, Paris (PX3).

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is from a larger body of work entitled “Los Restos de la Revolucion.” The series consists of portraits of the Sandinistas and their opposing Contra veterans, as well as artifacts and landscapes significant to the civil war that took place in Nicaragua during the 1980’s. After missing a Sandinista meeting at the local school in El Charcon, Victorio was arrested for suspicion of being a Contra collaborator. He spent a month in prison in the city of Jinotega. The cells were built underground and flooded almost to the ceiling every other day to torture the prisoners. He endured leeches; beatings and having bags filled with lye placed over his head until he couldn’t breathe. Interrogations were performed every night. He was told his family would be killed if he didn’t cooperate. When finally released, too weak to stand, he was dumped naked on the side of the road outside of Jinotega. Headlights appeared in the distance; miraculously, it was his neighbor driving by in a truck. The neighbor said, ‘Victorio you’re alive!’ Victorio responded, “Am I?”

Dimitri Stefanov January 16, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Bulgaria.
Tags:
comments closed


Burial in the village of Vulchi Trun, Bulgaria 2011

Dimitri Stefanov (b. 1987, Bulgaria) began an entry-level course in photography at the Escuela de Fotografía y Centro de Imagen in Madrid, when he was 19 years old. One year later, in 2009, he took a documentary photography course at the same school and was awarded the Most Promising Student of the Year. In 2010 he was  invited to show his work at the International Festival of Photography in Plodiv, Bulgaria. He was a runner-up as Young Bulgarian Photographer of the Year. In 2011, Dimitri was selected to attend the Joop Swart Masterclass. His work has also been recognized  by the POYi Emerging Vision Incentive and has been published in Bulgarian magazines such as One, Neq, BG Press Photo and others.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of a project called In Profundis conducted between 2010 and 2011 in my home country, Bulgaria. It is my direct approach to face of  death in the most physical sense.  The grandchildren are mourning the death of their grandmother in the cemetery chapel. Here I have to say that without the help and understanding of all deceased persons and families this project would not have been possible. Thanks to each and every one of them. I never lied to anyone when making these pictures. I just want the viewer see or feel what I felt in these tough times. I have a saying: Life is over only when the music stops.”

Tomasz Lazar January 12, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Poland.
Tags:
comments closed


From the series “Coastline”, Pobierowo, Poland 2010.

Tomasz Lazar (b. 1985, Poland) studied at the West Pomeranian University of Information Technology. He is currently a first year student at the Institute of Creative Photography in Opava (the Czech Republic). His work has been exhibited  in Poland and has been published in Radiate Magazine. Tomasz is currently working on a project titled Theater of Life, whose task is to move aspects of everyday life and cultural changes taking place in society as a result of the development of media and technology in the world. He was nominated for  International Photography Award 2011 in the category of “Deeper Perspective Photographer of the Year” and was also a participant in Eddie Adams Workshop in 2011.

About Photograph:

“This image shows a group of people taking part in competitions on the beach – searching for treasures in Pobierowo. Every year this event is organized for sunbathers.When I went to the beach and saw this situation, I knew I had to take a photo of it. The people were so busy looking for treasures they hardly noticed me. I took a few frames and went on. The entire scene looked like a huge one agricultural field. This photo is also part of my long-term project called Coastline. It is focus on three aspects: life of fisherman families, life on the beach and the landscapes.”

Ilvy Njiokiktjien January 9, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in South Africa.
Tags:
comments closed


Kommando Korps Camp, South Africa

Ilvy Njiokiktjien (b.1984, The Netherlands) studied journalism and photography in Utrecht. Ilvy graduated in 2006 and started working as a writer and photographer for the Dutch newspaper Sp!ts and for the Dutch Press Agenc ANP. In 2007 worked for The Star, a daily newspaper based in South Africa, Johannesburg. This is where the idea arose to travel from Johannesburg to Utrecht, by car. In 2008 she won the Canonprijs, part of the Zilveren Camera (Silver Camera). In that same year she also won the first prize in the National Geographic Photography Contest. In 2011 Njiokiktjien won the Canon AFJ Female Photojournalist Award. Her work on adolescents in South Africa will be presented at the Perpignan Photo Festival in 2012.

About the Photograph:

“These boys are part of a group known as the Kommando Korps, founded by a white fringe organisation in South Africa. The boys are at the camp for several reasons, one of them is to learn self defense. But the most important reason is to learn about their white race. Colonel Franz Jooste, the leader of the camp, teaches the kids about their white Afrikaner identity, the white struggle for a free country for whites within South Africa and other racist ideas. The children, all born after apartheid, are part of the so called born free generation. This generation was is supposed to bring unity and change in South Africa, but instead they are taught polarization and hatred towards blacks. I made this photograph while the boys were having a little break from their military style training. It was a moment when you could actually see that they are ‘normal’ boys, instead of young soldiers.”

Anne Ackermann January 5, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Germany.
Tags:
comments closed


Mormon Missionaries in Germany 2010

Anne Ackermann (b. 1980, Germany) studied Visual Communication and Photojournalism in Hamburg, Buenos Aires and Aarhus (Denmark). She started freelancing in 2008 and received an Eastern Europe Research Grant from Friedrich Ebert Foundation. Her project «Plástica» (2009) was widely exhibited, e.g. at PhotoGrafia Festival Rome, «Nuit Blanches» F-Stop Festival Leipzig and the New York Photo Festival. She was nominated for Joop Swart Masterclass in 2010. In 2011 Anne received a grant from VG Bildkunst. Her clients include Stern, Amnesty International Journal, Geolino, Yuno, Chrismon and many others. Anne lives in Hamburg where she splits her time between freelancing and following her own projects, currently focussing on Eastern Africa.

About the Photograph:

“This portrait of Sister Diana Simionescu, a young Romanian, is part of an assigned reportage that I did about young Mormon missionaries in Germany. I have been following her and her American friend in a small town in Northern Germany knocking on doors of suburban houses which would too often stay closed. The pair were approaching strangers to bring them the message of God and walking great distances on their self chosen mission to spread their belief. In the afternoon the girls decided to go home to devote their time to studying the Book of Mormon and a bit of German language. When I saw the afternoon light coming through the window to illuminate the young woman´s face, dedicating herself to what is the center of her belief, I was very much struck by the calm but centered expression of commitment on her face and body posture.”

Andrew McConnell January 2, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China.
Tags:
comments closed


Guangzhou’s main Square, China

Andrew McConnell (b. 1977, Ireland) began his photographic career in Belfast, working as a press photographer during the closing stages of “The Troubles” in the north of Ireland and the transition to peace. Since then he has worked on stories worldwide including the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, e-waste in Ghana, surfing in the Gaza Strip and the ongoing occupation of Western Sahara. McConnell is a double World Press Photo Award winner and a recipient of the NPPA Best of Photojournalism Best of Show Award, his images have appeared in the many of the world’s top publications.

About the Photograph:

“The image was taken in Guangzhou’s Railway Station Square, in China, and even for the most populated country in the world this place was busy. It always seemed to be thronged with at least a few thousand people and whether they were coming or going it was hard to tell. At regular spacings these Chinese soldiers kept watch over the public, always standing in threes, two looking forward one looking back. Their faces were grave and expressionless and it was obvious they wouldn’t be agreeing to any photographs. So I walked up to these three and made one frame before they exploded in angry condemnation of my act, I held my hands up, made my excuses, and left quietly.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,929 other followers