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Holly Wilmeth June 25, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China, United States.
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Kisses from Rhode Island and China

Holly Wilmeth was born and raised in Guatemala. As the daughter of a farmer, she spent half her time in the city and the other half in the dense jungles and agricultural landscapes of Guatemala. A freelance photographer based in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, she holds a degree in Political Science and Languages. She has traveled to over 45 countries as a cultural observer and avid hiker, living with nomad families in the Tibetan mountains as well as remote corners of East Asia and the far north of Mongolia. Her work has been published in National Geographic Adventure, Houston Chronicle, CARE, USAID, PBX, Christian Science Monitor and Time Magazine.

About the Photograph:

“The kiss series started with one picture of Russell Monk blowing a kiss that I sent to Peter Dennen at Aurora Photo and then to Susan Welchman at National Geographic. They were all a huge influence and motivator for the series. I did this because of the light subject as opposed to the other stories I always tend to work on. I knew I would also be traveling to over 13 countries in three months so it would be something I could shoot on the side. They are beautiful close-up shots of people from all over the world and different ethnicity’s.” Holly’s words about the project echo my exact same reasons for selecting this series.

Justin Guariglia June 20, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China.
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Two Portraits from “Planet Shanghai” © Justin Guariglia

Born in 1974 in Maplewood, New Jersey, Justin Guariglia has lived and worked in Asia for nearly a decade before returning to live in New York City in 2006. He is the author of the critically acclaimed photography book SHAOLIN: Temple of Zen, which the Aperture Foundation has turned into a 100-piece internationally traveling photography exhibition. Guariglia is a regular contributor to Smithsonian magazine, and is a photographer and contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler magazine. He has been nominated for the International Center of Photography’s Young Photographer Infinity Award, selected as a Fotofest Discovery of the Meeting Place, received several photo of the year awards, and was named one of the “30 Young Photographers under 30″ by Photo District News. His book Planet Shanghai was recently published by Chronicle Books.

About the Photograph:

“While I love Beijing, the cultural capital of China, I quickly became enamored with the character, and characters, of Shanghai’s back streets. There seemed to be a greater sense of pride, joy , and cohesion among the inhabitants here than elsewhere-as if they knew they were part of the club- the club of the real and everlasting. Like the artwork in Venice’s churches and pallazi, here the Shanghainese seem to be art in its original setting. The setting is the streets, and the art is the people themselves, living life in an urban alfresco, and often clad in silk to boot.” (more…)

Carolyn Drake May 12, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China, Ohio University.
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drake_uighurs.jpg
Traditional Uyghur Home, Western China

Carolyn Drake is a documentary photographer based in Istanbul. Her work has been supported through grants from the Fulbright Program, Duke University, and National Geographic and honored by UNICEF, World Press Photo and POYi. She was chosen as one of Photo District News’ 30 emerging photographers to watch in 2006 and as one of the Magenta Foundation’s emerging photographers in 2007. Her photo career began at the age of 30, when she decided to leave her multimedia job in New York’s Silicon Alley to learn about the world through personal experience. She studied history and media culture while in college at Brown University and later learned photography at ICP and Ohio University.

About the Photograph:

“The photo was taken at prayer time inside a Muslim home in Xinjiang, the autonomous Uyghur region in western China, where traditional life has been in decline for the last 100 years. In Xinjiang, many Uighurs still hold fast to rural traditions, working family farms, and traveling between vast stretches of mountain and desert to trade and mingle, but this lifestyle is quickly deteriorating under China’s vigorous modernization policies. The world’s powerful empires fold together here, influencing ethnic cultures that are among the world’s oldest. I traveled to Xinjiang at the end of a two month journey through the former Soviet Republics of Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. It was fascinating to step over the border into China after spending so much time thinking about the region in relation to the Soviet Union.”

Boris Svartzman May 6, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China.
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Old and New Shanghai. China 2007

Boris Svartzman is a French-Argentinian freelance photographer based in Shanghai. He has lived in China for seven years, including two years studying at the university in Chengdu and Shanghai. He graduated in France with a degree in philosophy and sociology. Photography and social studies are two complementary ways for him to describe the world. His series on China’s demolition has been selected in the Paris Match Students Photojournalism Competition (2005), in Visa pour l’Image Photojournalism Festival (2006), and published in Foto 8. He is represented by Prospekt Photo Agency in Italy.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of a series about the demolition of old neighborhoods in Shanghai which I considered the first chapter in the urbanisation of China. It took time to gain access and trust to photograph the living conditions of the underpaid workers.. They weren’t used to having human relations in a city where they are forced to hide from the public. They are recycling materials of the demolished traditional houses in this photograph. After talking and showing an interest in their work some of them opened their doors and invited me to dinner.”

Sean Gallagher April 1, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China.
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gallagher_beijing.jpg
From the series: Bye Bye Beijing

Sean Gallagher is a British Photojournalist, currently based in Beijing, China. His work focuses on highlighting various social and environmental issues throughout Asia, with specific emphasis on China. Gallagher has worked for various international clients including BBC News, The Globe and Mail (Canada), Die Zeit (Germany), The Ecologist (UK), Channel 7 News (Australia), NEED Magazine (US) and the British Journal of Photography. His work is represented by Grazia Neri and in January 2008 Sean was the first recipient for the David Allan Harvey prize for emerging photographers.

About the Photograph:

On every city street corner in Beijing, the city’s traditional alley- way and court yard based homes or Hutongs are being destroyed. The destruction of Hutongs has been taking place for a number of years, however since Beijing was awarded the 2008 Summer Olympics, the rate at which they are now being cleared has increased exponentially.

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