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Ollie Harrop June 24, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in England.
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From the series ‘All That Glitters Is Gold’. London 2009

Ollie Harrop (b.1980, Denmark) graduated from Goldsmiths College and has interned at Magnum Photo Agency was featured in the Royal Photographic Society Journal as an up and coming documentary photographer. His most recent work ‘I Love It When You Sing’, a documentary in East London, has been published by the The British Journal of Photography, The Big Issue, BBC Arts, The Guardian and Phaidon Agenda. His commercial work covers architecture, events and portraiture. Clients include the The Freud Museum, Punch Taverns and Wateraid. Ollie is also the events organizer for Contact Editions, a company that supports emerging and established photographers through print sales.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is part of a project examining a group of artists, musicians and designers who occupied a block of empty buildings in South London. Squatting at the time was legal in England, and I was interested in the creative possibilities of utilizing these spaces. I spent a lot of time with the community over a few months, and Ness was regularly there, helping sort through stock and labeling clothing, soaking everything up. I was lucky to catch her lost in her own thoughts at the back of one of the shops, which at the time almost resembled a set for a modern fairytale. It was one of those moments that can come about if you get to know a space well, and wait for the right photo to come to you.”

Tim Richmond May 30, 2013

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The knife thrower’s assistant. Kent, England

Tim Richmond (b.1959, England) studied film and photography in London. For twenty-five years he has photographed portraiture, fashion and for the last five years has been concentrating on his fine art projects. Continuing to shoot on film, he prints all his own exhibition prints at his base in Somerset, England. Tim’s work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, The Sunday Times and Saturday Telegraph Magazine, and is in the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery, as well as in Private American and European Collections .

About the Photograph:

“I had been looking for a modern day knife thrower and assistant to photograph, and found Jon Anton in Kent, England. Living in  a luxury caravan on a farm, he was able to use the un-used barns while he was practicing with his assistant. I caught a moment where her eyes betrayed an expression that indicated she had seen enough knives flash by her for one life.”

Neil A. White May 6, 2013

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From the series “Lost Villages“. Skipsea, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.2011

Neil A. White (b. 1972, England) is a photographer and teacher currently living in London. Growing up in the north of England, Neil would escape to the countryside whenever he could. This fascination with the natural world and contrasting environments is at the heart of his photography and an infinite source of inspiration. Neil received and MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography in 2006 from the University of the Arts in London, adding to his BSc in Engineering Management. Work from his Lost Villages series has been published in The Guardian Magazine and Geographical Magazine and was highly commended in The Environmental Photographer of the Year competition in 2011.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is from a series called Lost Villages. The Holderness coast located in the North East of England endures the highest rate of coastal erosion in Europe. The devastating consequence of this is villages and land slowly disappearing into the sea. This project explores the constant battle between the North Sea and the mainland, and to document the irreversible change-taking place on this coast line. I had actually taken the picture of the road and packed my equipment up and started to walk back to the car. Then in the not so far distance I saw the man and dogs walking towards me and thought this could bring something else to the picture. With moments to spare I quickly ran back, got my field camera back on my tripod frantically put a film case in the back of the camera and took the picture with literally seconds to spare. It all happened so quickly I was worried that I may have made a mistake. When I saw the negative from the lab I knew I had a great photograph. It was one of those rare times in photography when the elements came together and I really felt everything come together.

Chris Harrison March 4, 2013

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River Don, Jarrow, England 2011

Chris Harrison (b. 1967, England) received his Masters from The Royal College of Art in London in 1999. His first exhibition was based on his junior school class photo (1978), where he traced everybody including his best friend in jail for murder. His personal work has been exhibited in museums and galleries throughout Europe. Highlights include “Under the Hood” being selected to represent British photography at Arles and his work on WW1 Memorials in Britain “Sites of Memory” that was part of the show “How we are” at the Tate in London. His monograph I Belong Jarrow was recently published by Schilt Publishing in Amsterdam. Chris is currently the National Media Museums Bradford Fellow in Photography doing a project about the machine his father worked with in his factory job.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from my book I belong Jarrow. I have forgotten the language of my fathers and not yet learned the language of my children. I was born and brought up in Jarrow, a tough industrial town in the south bank of the river Tyne. It’s where I call home. I have lived abroad for more years than I care to admit. My Mother and Father are getting old and moving out of Jarrow, cutting me adrift with now way back. Finally, I have been forced to think about who I am and where I belong. I never wanted to leave Jarrow. I always imagined that one day I would make it my home. I realize now that I can never return. Somehow I traded knowledge of the outside world for some vital piece of me. With this realization, I have returned home in order to try to establish how much of where I am from determines who I am, and to begin to understand why I can’t seem to let go.”

“This shot is of the River Don which flows quietly and when I was younger toxically through Jarrow. When I was a kid the only thing that was ever fished out of the river were bikes and shopping trollies. Now since we are in a postindustrial age we have small fish, Kingfishers, Otter and even Salmon. I find myself struggling with my nostalgia for a harsher time and place. Hopefully, by photographing the places I know intimately I can show something we all instinctively recognize; that, as L.P. Hartley said so eloquently “The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.“

Arnhel de Serra August 15, 2012

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Lubavitch Family on the Night Before Passover. London 2006

Arnhel de Serra (b. 1964, England) studied photography under David Hurn at Gwent College, Newport, South Wales. Initially starting out as a portrait photographer his focus soon changed to a reportage based approach. His clients include: The Sunday Times, Stern Magazine, The Independent Magazine, Saatchi and Saatchi, BP, and The National Trust among others. Arnhel’s work was shown at the London Festival of Photography in 2012 as part of the exhibition The Great British Public. He is represented by Blunt Management and resides in London.

About the Photograph:

“This image is taken from a commissioned series entitled “Identities”, shot for The Jewish Museum in London in 2006 to mark the 350th anniversary of Jewish Life in Britain. It was taken on the evening before the Jewish holiday of Pesach or Passover, at the Kesticher’s, a Lubavitch family living in Stamford Hill. Hametz, or leavening, is made from one of five types of grain added to water and left to stand for more than eighteen minutes. During Pesach it is forbidden to consume or to have any leavened products in one’s home, and in many traditional households a search is made the night before following days of meticulous cleaning.”

It is customary to conduct the search by candlelight using a feather and a spoon; by candlelight to illuminate the corners without casting a shadow; the feather dusts crumbs out of any corners and the wooden spoon is used to collect crumbs which are burned with the Hametz the following day. The Kesticher’s went as far as cleaning the inside of the taps on the kitchen sink with a blow torch. Mr. Kesticher is searching in one of his son’s room for the ten pieces of Hametz that his children have hidden throughout the house. His younger son can be seen holding the feather and the spoon, and the Hametz is hidden in the small pack of kitchen foil attached to the top of the symbol. As for Tony Blair, well who knows?”

Stuart Matthews August 12, 2011

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Football Fans, London 2010

Stuart Matthews (b. 1984, England) graduated from Plymouth University in 2007 after being selected a finalist of the Ilford Student Photographer of the Year. During his final year he traveled to China to document this evolving super power of the 21st century. Stuart covered Kosovo’s independence in 2008 and later that year interned at NOOR Images. Since then, he has made various trips to document the impact of climate change in Bangladesh and the effect that this is having on communities living on the front line. He was funded as part of the Ideas Tap / Magnum Photos Photographic Award 2010 to continue his work there.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is from a project titled ‘High Hopes and Expectations’. It is a story that I shot in 2010, documenting fans throughout London crowded around TV’s nervously waiting in anticipation to see their country competing in the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. This image was taken in an Italian bar in Soho, the atmosphere was quite intense after Paraguay had scored just before half time. Italian fans waited and prayed in hope of an equalizer which came from Daniel De Rossi in the 63rd minute to draw their opening game.”

John Angerson June 6, 2011

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Repatriation Procession, Wootton Bassett, England 2010

John Angerson (b.1969 Bristol, England) started his career in the early 1990’s, covering the fall of the Berlin Wall and the changing geopolitical landscape of Eastern Europe. Since then, his practice has continued to explore the different languages of documentary photography, focusing on how specific communities form, shift and develop. His personal projects have garnered critical acclaim and have been exhibited at major art institutions in the UK and overseas. His latest monograph – Love, Power, Sacrifice (published by Dewi Lewis, Manchester) documented the Jesus Army over a twenty-year period and peers into a microcosm of fanatical religion.

About the Photograph:

The small town of Wootton Bassett has become the focus of the regular repatriation processions of fallen servicemen and women from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The bodies are transported from RAF Lyneham and pass through the town on their way to the coroner in Oxford. Family members, friends and the local community assemble along the route in silent tribute for the men who all died within six days of each other.” This image is from the  project ‘English Journey’ a contemporary photographic journey that embraces the spirit of JB Priestley’s ‘English Journey’, by using the subtitle of the book: Being a rambling but truthful account of what one man saw, heard felt and thought during a journey through England.

Stephen McLaren April 29, 2011

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Hackney, East London 2006

Stephen McLaren (b. 1967, England) was a television director and cameraman making  documentaries for the BBC before digital cameras brought him back to  photography. He became a professional photographer in 2005 and works mainly in London. His work has been published in The Guardian, Observer, BJP and the New Yorker among others and is set to appear in three exhibitions this year, “London Street Photography” at the Museum of London, FORMAT at the University of Derby, and Look 2011 in Liverpool. Stephan has also curated street photography exhibitions which have traveled in Europe with the British Council and is the co-editor of the book Street Photography Now, published by Thames and Hudson in 2010.

About the Photograph:

“I am shooting a series about how couple’s relationships play themselves out in public, especially when you can tell that some kind of emotional dynamic is affecting their behavior. Okay, its a bit voyeuristic, a bit nosy, but I’m sure we all know what it’s like to be in a public space but reacting only to our partner’s emotional state. So on a stormy day on a canal in east London I am taking refuge from a sudden downpour under a bridge with a couple who are at the tail end of an argument. Rather than hang around and exacerbate the tension the woman decides she’s rather be soaked wet. I have no idea why they were arguing but her reaction left me with lots of questions.”

Anastasia Taylor-Lind February 3, 2011

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Camilla and Amy in their caravan at The Wirral Show, England 2008

Anatasia Taylor-Lind (b.1981,England) is a documentary photographer currently based in the Middle East and working for clients such as GEO Germany, The Telegraph Magazine and Marie Claire. She is part of the VII Photo Agency mentor program, and has degrees from the University of Wales Newport and the London College of Communication. Anastasia’s work has been exhibited internationally, in spaces such as The Frontline Club, Saatchi Gallery and National Portrait Gallery in London, the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam and Fovea Exhibitions in New York. She has received a number of photography awards in support of her personal work, from a diverse range of organisations such as Canon Italy, The Royal Photographic Society, The Guardian, Channel4 and Deutsche Bank.

About the Photograph:

“This picture was taken at the Wirral showground in England in July 2008. I spent the weekend there with Camilla and Amy in their caravan, living with them and making pictures as they performed equestrian stunts for large audiences at the show. I had initially intended to make a story that focused on the amazing work that Camilla does, as one of the youngest and most promising stunt riders and horse masters in the industry, but I quickly realized that her relationship with Amy would be central to the story. I wanted to photograph Camilla because I grew up with horses and had always wanted to work with them, until I discovered photography at 16. The only thing I’ve had to sacrifice in the course of becoming a photographer is having horses in my life. So this story, which was self initiated and self funded, was an opportunity to experience in some small way what Camilla’s life might be like.”

(more…)

Toby Smith October 25, 2010

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Sleaford, England 2009

Toby Smith (b. 1982, England) is freelance Photographer based in East London. Since graduating from the London College of Communication in 2008 he began shooting for editorial clients. He works with large format, using both ambient and his own introduced light, with no retouching to change the way we perceive the subject matter. Toby currently works from Roof Unit a photography collective that he co-founded.

About the Photograph:

“I photographed the back-roads around the fringe of Lincolnshire where the population density thins and the night sky thickens. The dark of night allowed me to create footpaths and gain vantage points that during the visibility of daylight would be off limits. Over the next five months I found myself impulsively driving to their locations this time led in by the rows of pylons, their dominant stacks or halo of safety lights. We are quick to use them as negative icons of pollution but ignorant of our reliance on the electricity they produce. All of the images in this series are captured between sunset and sunrise with colour film exposures between two minutes and two hours.”

Liz Hingley June 7, 2010

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Polish Community Center. Birmingham, England 2008

Liz Hingley (b.1985, UK) is a documentary photographer and researcher based in London. She graduated from Brighton University with a first class BA Honours in Editorial Photography and recently completed a two-year scholarship with Fabrica research and communications department in Italy. Liz is now studying for her MSc in Social Anthropology at University College London. Her photography has won international awards including the ‘Taylor Wessing’ National Portrait award 2009, Ian Parry award 2007 and finalist in the Terry O’Neil award.  She has exhibited in solo and group shows in the UK, France and Budapest.  Her photographs have been featured in arts and journalist publications and academic journals in the UK, France Italy and China from the Sunday Times and Le Monde to Foto8. She is currently working on educational projects with the National Portrait gallery in London and the Royal society of Arts in Paris.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from the project ‘Under Gods, stories from Soho Road’, which explores the everyday spiritual practices and religious life that play out on this one street. The Soho Road in Birmingham, one of the UK’s most culturally diverse cities where over 90 different nationalities now live, is the site of some 30 religious centers for denominations from around the world. The Polish are now an established community in Britain with many immigrants still arriving each year. They show incredible devotion to Catholicism and their traditional religious practices from back home. I met this chef in the Polish community center restaurant on Soho road, catching a moment of calm amongst the hectic Christmas festivities. The center is more than busy at this time, catering to an array of celebrations from St Nicholas visits to hundreds of children and their eager mothers, to the over 80’s Christmas dinner dance.”

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Chloe Dewe Mathews April 16, 2010

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Banger race. England, 2008

Chloe Dewe Mathews (b. 1982, London) studied Fine Art at the Ruskin School, University of Oxford. After graduating she worked in the commercial film industry for three years. Both inspired and frustrated she turned to photography, as a more immediate and intimate creative process. Working with people in their natural environment enabled her to engage with the world more directly.  She has exhibited in London, Birmingham, Buenos Aires and Berlin and has been published in the Times, the Independent, Burn Magazine and Dazed and Confused.  She is currently travelling from Bombay to Britain overland, gathering material for her next major project.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photograph at a Banger race, held in a racetrack surrounded by woods on the outskirts of London.  For a year, I followed this small community of people around South East England, who invest all their time and money in doing up old, useless cars, only to smash them to pieces at the end of the week.  Alex, on the left, used to wreck 50 cars a year, but told me he got bored when the drivers stopped “hitting as hard”.  The raw machismo of Alex and his friends was infectious, and the strange clash of resourceful creativity and reckless destruction really appealed to me.  I managed to persuade one of the drivers to tow his written-off car into the gallery where I showed the series at the end of last year.  Hopefully people looked at the photographs as well as the car.”

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Massimo Sciacca February 17, 2010

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Royal Ascot Race. Berkshire, England 2008

Massimo Sciacca (b.1965, Italy) joined the Lucky Star photo agency in 1991 and covered various stories including the first days of the war in the former Yugoslavia and the free elections in Albania in 1992. In March 1997 he photographed the peoples’ rebellion in Albania. One of the photographs in this series was awarded a prize from the World Press Photo Contest. From 1998 to 2004 he has been on the staff of the Contrasto Agency, Italy. In 2002, he photographed completed a long term project on the largest prison of Manila  called “The Paper Tiger”. He is currently a member of Prospekt Photographers Agency and is based in Milan, Italy.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken during the Royal Ascot in Berkshire England, the world’s most famous horse race. The ladies were standing in front of the horse path waiting for Her Majesty the Queen of England on her horse-drawn carriage. I wanted to show the atmosphere of the event- the British fever for horse racing, betting, drinking and singing national songs. Next to the high society and the Royal family there were the three hundred thousand middle class who invade Ascot each year. They are looking to feel and be part of the event as if  finally realizing a dream. Royal Ascot has a strict dress code and it has become an excuse to transform the horse race into a fashion show. Men dress formally including a top hat while the ladies must not show bare midriffs or shoulders and cover their heads. The woman’s hats are actually the real players of the Royal Ascot event.”

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Phillip Toledano November 25, 2009

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From the series “Days with my Father”

Phillip Toledano (1977, England) was born to a French Moroccan mother, and an American father. He believes that photographs should be like unfinished sentences. There should always be space for questions. Phillip’s work is primarily socio-political, and varies in medium, from photography, to installation. His first book, entitled “Bankrupt” (Photographs of recently vacated offices) was published by Twin Palms in 2005. His new book, ‘Phone Sex’ was published in 2008. ‘Days with my Father’, will be published in the spring of 2010. Phillip’s most recent project was installation art, not photography. Entitled ‘America, the gift shop”, the premise was: If George Bush’s foreign policy had a souvenir shop, what would it sell? This work was shown at the Center for photography at Woodstock. His work has appeared in Vanity Fair, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Esquire, GQ, Wallpaper, The London Times amongst others. He has exhibited worldwide.

About the Photograph:

“When I was taking pictures of my father, I felt like someone drinking deeply from the well for a last time, before setting out on a long journey alone.  I wanted to remember as much as possible.  To see as much as I could, to remember smells, conversations, the light on my father’s face when he smiled, when he was angry. It was very strange, spending time with someone I knew would die soon (we both knew, and where both waiting for it). I did the project never thinking it would speak to other people. It’s funny, now, in retrospect, that something I thought was so personal is so universal. A big part of the project now has been the reaction from others. It’s incredible getting emails from people who want to reconnect with their estranged fathers, after looking at the work. Or from families, who’ve looked at the photos together. I have to say, it’s been an honor to help people.”

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