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Nancy Borowick June 2, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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A water well at the Triumph International School. Mowire Ghana, 2010.

Nancy Borowick (b. 1985, United States) is a humanitarian photographer based in New York City. She is a graduate of the Documentary Photography and Photojournalism program at the International Center of Photography and holds a degree in Anthropology from Union College. Nancy is a regular contributor to Newsday, amNY, and Corbis and her work has also been featured in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, Lens Blog, CNN, Time.com, Photo District News and the Washington Post. She was recently named one of the 2013 Magenta Foundation Flash Forward Emerging Photographers.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photograph in the village of Mowire, about 230 miles north of Ghana’s capital, Accra. I had been living in this village and teaching at the local school during the spring of 2008 and before leaving, I asked the headmasters if there was something I could give back to the school and its students, as my experience there was truly life changing. A water well was their answer. I spent many mornings waking up before dawn and trekking to the nearby well alongside my students to collect water for the school and I watched as these kids took this journey over and over again, straining their young bodies before a very long day of class and chores.”

“I was determined to give them this gift, this luxury of clean water, and after returning home to New York City I spent the next two years raising funds for the project. After two failed drilling attempts, break downs in communication and many broken hearts, the third time was the charm. We finally hit water. It was clear, clean and safe to drink and many children could be seen filling up empty water bottles to bring home to their families. I shot this image after the official ceremonial unveiling of the well and as I snapped the image of the flowing water, the children flew into the frame, drinking as much of this delicious, safe water as they could during this sweltering afternoon. Access to safe drinking water is a gift that many take for granted and being able to share this with my students and the surrounding community was a truly humbling and rewarding experience.”

Kai Löffelbein May 3, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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E-Waste Dump, Accra, Ghana 2011

Kai Löffelbein (b. 1981, Germany) majored in political science and in 2008 began his studies in photojournalism and documentary photography at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Hanover. Since 2007, he has been working as a freelance photographer for different NGOs and several newspapers. Kai traveled through various countries in South America, Asia and Eastern Europe. Meeting people who have to fight for survival on a daily basis raised his desire to grab his viewers attention and make them take action. Kai has received several prizes including the First Prize, Unicef photo of the year award (2011), Eight Days Japan International Award (2012), First Prize, Canon Pro Photo Award (2012). He was also nominated for the Joop Swart Masterclass (2012).

About The Photograph:

“This photo is part of my reportage about e-waste in Ghana. According to a United Nations evaluation, up to 50 million tons of toxic electronic waste accumulate annually in the whole world. With the voluntary ratification of the Basel Convention in 1989, the countries are forbidden by law to further export toxic electronic waste to countries that are not members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. Ghana is, apart from China and India, one of the countries to which most of the electronic waste is being shipped. This dump is situated in the midst of Accra, in Agbogbloshie. Here, electronic appliances that are no longer functioning are being recycled by hand in the most primitive of conditions. Small boys dismantle electronic items day by day.” (more…)

Jessica Hilltout July 26, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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Tawfig, Kusawku, Ghana, 2008

Jessica Hilltout (b. 1977, Belgium) has been traveling ever since her parents exposed her to the world and this sparked her fascination with images. As a young woman, she attended Art College in Blackpool, England and later worked briefly (and unhappily) in commercial photography. In 2002 she traveled through Central Asia and Africa photographing the seemingly unimportant, the apparently hidden and finding beauty in both. Jessica’s work is proof positive that beauty can be found anywhere, especially in those unique imperfections that mark our individuality.

About the Photograph:

This is one of my favorite images. This young footballer is called Tawfig. I spent six days in his village. The main activity here is farming. Everyday around 4pm the boys gather on the field and play football after farming. Football is a way of getting ridding of stress after a long day in the fields. Football is precious, its a necessity. The heat of the day is disappearing, the field is surrounded by spectators, the boys play with an amazing energy. No rules just fun and fair play. You hear giggling, laughter, oooooing aaaahhhing, the chickens and the goats wandering or grazing off the edge of the field, a young girl sells nuts… Then the light falls and within minutes the field is empty, everyone goes home, relaxed, exhausted, smiling, ready to eat, sleep and start a new day. In this image, I made group shot of Tawfig’s team. A magical moment came and went. I saw Tawfig through my lens, eyes closed, hand to heart… a spontaneous gesture. For me this image breathes belief, passion, love, happiness and that special pulsating energy which is unique to the African continent.” (more…)

Peter DiCampo April 24, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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Children play in groundnut plants  after helping their families harvest, Wantugu, Ghana, 2007

Peter DiCampo (b. 1984, USA) is an American photographer who divides his time between Africa and the United States. With the help of a grant from The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, he is currently documenting Ghana’s Kayayo, a class of thousands of young girls who migrate from Ghana’s barren north to find work in southern cities. He launched his freelance career in 2007 while also serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in rural Ghana. He was a Staff Photographer at The Telegraph in Nashua, New Hampshire, and interned at VII Photo in Paris, Newsday in New York, and the Harvard University News Office. He holds a B.S. in Photojournalism from Boston University. He has received awards from the 2008 Editor and Publisher Photos of the Year Contest and the 2006 New England Press Association. His clients include TIME, The Christian Science Monitor,  Jeune Afrique and The Boston Globe.

About the Photograph:

“This image is the result of a whole day spent harvesting groundnuts with women and children, and occasionally photographing them, outside of the village where I lived for two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer. Looking at it reminds me of the limits of photography, and of storytelling in general – you stay in a place for so long that you no longer know how to tell its story. This is me, in between other photography projects and my Peace Corps work, going outside with a camera and trying to tell you about the place I lived in. It’s not enough – your soul can’t smile when you suddenly realize you can speak to people in their language, and your heart can’t break when the kid down the road falls ill and dies. You can’t breathe the dust or taste the shea fruit or hear the drumming in the night. Very few pictures have that power. All the same, here’s the tiniest glimpse of daily life in northern Ghana, a place that I once called home.”

Dana Romanoff January 5, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana, Ohio University.
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Emilia, Ewe Region, Ghana

Dana Romanoff is an award-winning photographer freelancing outside of Denver, Colorado. She recently completed a project for National Geographic Magazine entitled: No Man’s Land about the changing roles of women in left behind in Mexico due to immigration. Before working freelance, Dana worked as a staff photographer at newspapers including The Charlotte Observer, The Free Lance-Star and The Oregonian. As a journalist, Dana combines her passion for cultural studies, social issues and photography. She believes that photographs have the power to break down barriers and build bridges whether it be across oceans or between backyards. Raised in New York, Dana received her BA in American Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester and MA in Photojournalism from Ohio University. Dana has worked and lived around the globe as a photographer and outdoor and cultural guide.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was made while working on a project about women in a controversial practice of African Traditional Religion in the Ewe region of Ghana, West Africa. There, women and girls are sent to shrines to atone for the crimes of their ancestors. Christian NGOs say the females are slaves to the shrines and have called world-wide attention in attempt for funding to “liberate and rehabilitate” the women and girls. The practitioners say the females are the queens of their towns and that Christians are trying to eradicate traditional religion. I spent six months studying and photographing the people of the town and their religious practice. I saw no human rights abused and feel the controversy truly is an attempt to exploit a traditional practice and people to spread Christianity. This particular photo is of Emilia whose father’s family helped establish some of the shrines which serve as a moral and educational institution in the town helps to prevent premarital sex and crime. Emilia, 15, is heartbroken because her father prohibited her to see her boyfriend. She sits along the main road in town clutching a fake flower.”

Olivier Asselin October 27, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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Ghana, 2008

Olivier Asselin is an award-winning Canadian photographer based in Accra, Ghana, West Africa. His work has appeared in major newspapers and magazines worldwide including: TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times, Le Nouvel Observateur, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe, Toronto Star, Vancouver Sun, and The Washington Post among others. His awards include: PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris The Human Condition Photo Contest, 2008. Gordon Parks International Photo Contest Winner, Third Place IX Luis Valtueña Award for Humanitarian Photography, 2007. In October 2006, he attended the Eddie Adams Workshop.

About the Photograph:

“David Amuzu, 12, sits among his classmates in school in the town of Amasaman, Ghana. “I can’t see what the teacher is writing on the blackboard”, he says. The pigment that gives skin its color – called melanin – is also a key element in the development of the eye. Because of the absence of melanin, most people with albinism have poor eyesight, especially from a distance. Regarding the challenges of photographing in Ghana I feel that here, the only way to get access to anything is to go through someone who has credibility with the people you want to reach.”

It’s well worth checking out the audio slide show  about the Albinism in Ghana that Olivier made on this story.

Karl Banchet June 3, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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Boxing in Accra , Ghana 2005

Karl Blanchet is a freelance photographer based in London. Through his work, Karl tries to tell the stories of people who have something to say and bring attention to humanitarian issues. Karl is an active member of the international collective of photographers Luna. Karl’s images are distributed by the agencies Visum in Germany, Zuma in the US, INA in the Nordic countries and Contrasto in Italy.

About the Photograph:

Accra’s old quarter, Jamestown, is home to 21 boxing clubs. Every evening, courtyards and old houses are transformed into training rings for young men, ages 16 to 22. The young boxers dream of becoming great champions who will fight in the US or the UK. They see boxing as their one shot to become rich and famous, and they hope to follow in the footsteps of the great Ghanaian boxers who have achieved international stardom. But the path to boxing glory is still very long.

Thomas Lee March 11, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
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lee_ghana.jpg
Musican celebrating during a soccer event in Ghana

Born 1982 in Taipei, Thomas Lee was raised in Hong Kong, educated in Chicago, and now based in New York. Thomas meanders between the East and the West, seeking inspiration for his work as a journalist-artist. He has completed projects in Afghanistan, Uganda, the United States, and China. His work has been published in The New York Times, International Herald Tribune, PDN, American Photo, and NEED, among other U.S. and international publications.

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