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Sofie Amalie Klougart August 8, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Kenya.
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Bamburi Beach, Mombasa Kenya 2010

Sofie Amalie Klougart (b. 1987, Denmark) works as a freelance photographer in Copenhagen. In 2010 she went to Kenya working for a humanitarian organization and the Danish paper Dagbladet Information covering child prostitution and female sex tourism. In 2011 she won the first prize at the Danish POY for best domestic reportage about The Danish Peoples Party, a group who proposed stopping all non-western emigration to Denmark. In 2012 she was chosen to participate in the Joop Swart Masterclass organized by World Press Photo. Sofie is currently studying at the Danish School of Media and Journalism in Århus.

About the Photograph:

“In Mombasa, Kenya, there is a market for female sex tourism. Along the beach frontier, Kenyan men offer themselves to passing women. The meetings between local men and foreign women often spawn romantic feelings for the women that go beyond the act of sex. This phenomenon is known as romance tourism. I met Frank at Bamburi Beach where he was walking by the shore. He is 35 years old and lived from selling shoes and from the money he got from staying with western women. His English was poor but his message was clear. Frank was quite aware of his looks, so when I asked to photograph him he posed without giving it a second thought. As I walked away he went back into the water waiting for other women to pass. I had come to Kenya to portray the women, but I kept returning to this photograph because it crystallizes what the women fall for: sun, sand and sex. A  simpler life I suppose”

Bob Miller May 31, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Kenya.
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Caribbean Crew Youth Group. Nairobi 2011

Bob Miller (b. 1986, United States) is a photographer and multimedia storyteller with roots in America’s deep South. His work has been recognized by the National Press Photographers Association, College Photographer of the Year, the International Photography Awards, American Photography and the Alexia Foundation for World Peace. He has also exhibited in solo and group shows both nationally and internationally. Having a background in graphic design, Bob returned to graduate school in the summer of 2010 to study photojournalism at Syracuse University’s Newhouse School of Public Communications. He currently works as the photographer and filmmaker for the Slaughter Group.

About the Photograph:

“Members of the Caribbean Crew Youth Group wash cars and 14-passenger Matatus at the entrance to Kibera slum in Nairobi. The money earned from their labor is consistent but minimal says acting secretary Abdallah Juma, 23. Financial instability is the group’s primary hurdle to reaching the long term goal of seeing fewer youths unemployed. “We are the founders of this country,” Juma said. “Even without government intervention, we as youth can do it ourselves.” Caribbean Youth was begun in 2008 as a result of the post-election violence, and since then has adopted over 60 members. In addition to the car wash, the youth gather manure for compost, sort plastics to sell for income and organize a conflict management and peacekeeping team.”

Michael Zumstein April 10, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Kenya.
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NGO Facilities, Lokichokio, Kenya

Michaël Zumstein (b. 1970, France) has been a member of the Oeil Public agency since 2001. He divides his time between assignments for the French and foreign press and his personal projects. His work focuses on the “relationships between Africa and the West” and he is especially interested in the situation in the Great Lakes region of Central Africa. His work has been published extensively in France and internationally.

About the Photograph:

“Kenyan town faces loss of livelihood after Sudan peace deal: Lokichokio has thrived on business generated by humanitarian aid organisations but soon they may move out. Lokichokio, in northern Kenya, is no ordinary town. For the Past 16 years it has hosted one of the world’s largest humanitarian operations, growing from a tiny, arid frontier post of fewer than 1,000 people to a bustling logistical and transit hub of 12,000 – largely working for international aid groups (NGOs) and UN agencies delivering hundreds of millions of dollars of relief to war-ravaged southern Sudan. However, Lokichokio faces challenging times. The southern Sudanese rebels and the Khartoum government recently signed a treaty to end a 21-year conflict, a move that should enable aid agencies to transfer operations to the area they serve without fear of being shot or bombed. For Lokichokio – which has flourished in a time of war – peace could mean a return to obscurity.”

Casper Hedberg November 19, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Kenya.
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Kisumu, Kenya 2008

Born in 1983, Casper Hedberg grew up in a small village in the southern part of Sweden. By the age of 14 he took a darkroom class and got hooked on photography. Casper’s professional career started in 2005, when he began working as a full time photographer. He received his  degree of photojournalism  from the Mid Sweden University in Sundsvall. He currently lives in Stockholm and works on assignment for Swedish newspapers and magazines. Awards include: “Pictorial Feature of the Year – Foreign” 2008, 1st prize, Swedish Picture of the Year Award. “Picture of the year” 2007, (SPYA). “News picture Sweden” 2007, 1st prize, (SPYA)

About the Photograph:

”Kisumu, in western Kenya, was heavily affected by the post-election disturbances. The entire city center was burnt down and road blocks were raised surrounding the city. The ODM party announced three days of peaceful demonstrations but the police replied with live bullets. A desperate jump, in a desperate situation. The conflict that erupted in Kenya after the presidential election in December 2007 has exposed fissures in the facade of the leading East African country. Since January 2008 Kenya has plunged into a deep crisis of ethnic cleansing. It all began on December 30th, when the election results were made official and the incumbent president Mwai Kibaki was announced winner. Quickly and secretly sworn in for five more years of power, one month after the election more than 500,000 people have been displaced by the violence and over 1,500 people were killed.”

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