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Nichole Sobecki January 3, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Libya.
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Opposition fighters wake at dawn in a small building at the rebel-held checkpoint near the Ras Lanuf oil refinery. Libya 2011

Nichole Sobecki (b. 1986, USA) is an independent photographer and writer based in Nairobi, Kenya. Nichole studied political science at Tufts University and photography at the International Center of Photography and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. From 2008-2011 Nichole was the Turkey Correspondent for Global Post, based in Istanbul. During that time she also covered the early days of the Libyan uprising, the ongoing war in Afghanistan, developmental challenges facing Nepal, and the aftermath of the assassination of Benazir Bhutto. Her work has appeared in publications including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, The Times of London, The Guardian, Le Monde M Magazine and GlobalPost.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is of a group of opposition fighters in Libya, waking at dawn to another day of fighting at a rebel-held checkpoint near the Ras Lanuf oil refinery. I arrived in eastern Libya soon after the uprising began, and worked as a correspondent for GlobalPost covering the early days of the revolution and its descent into civil war. The night before this photo was taken I had slept at an abandoned hotel in Ras Lanuf, then under the management of a group of rebel soldiers. Around four in the morning I awoke to pounding on the door, and the news that Gaddafi’s forces were on their way to retake the town. I left for a nearby checkpoint to find groups of opposition fighters slowly waking up, making tea, and calling their families before the day’s chaos began.”

Fabio Bucciarelli August 10, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Libya.
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Sirte, Libya 2011

Fabio Bucciarelli (b.1980, Italy) received a MS in Engineering in 2006 from the Politecnico of Turin. He also attended the Universidad Politecnica of Valencia, where he specialized in digital imaging. From 2009 he devoted himself entirely to photography and started working as staff photographer for the agency La Presse/AP. Fabio has won several international awards and his work has been published in Stern, The Times, The Telegraph, Vanity Fair, Internazionale, La Repubblica, Le Monde, L’Espresso among others. He recently wrote the book ‘The Smell of the War’ about the Libyan conflict. He feels an urgency to tell the story of people who are rendered powerless and to provide unbiased information focused on human rights. Fabio is represented by LUZ photo Agency.

About the Photograph:

“In 2011, I spent three months in Libya covering the war. From the beginning, before the NATO actions, passing from the fall of Tripoli, until its end, when Gaddafi was captured and killed in Sirte. During the final siege of Sirte, a few days after covering the fighting, I came back from the front line and was searching for something to photograph that would help explain the spirit of the Libyan conflict. An image that was different from the thousands of others depicting the cruelty and inhumanity of war. A few hundred meters from the fire I saw a revolutionary soldier wearing a military hat similar to those worn by Gaddafi’s military looking at the horizon while sitting on a rocket mounted on a pickup in the desert near Sirte. The pride in his expression was iconic, telling of the weariness of war and the deep hope for a change. A freedom denied for so many years.”

Daniel Etter April 16, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Libya.
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Libyans Celebrate the Fall of Gaddafi in Tripoli, 2011

Daniel Etter (b. 1980, Germany) is a graduate of the German School of Journalism. He holds a Master’s degree in political science and a university diploma in journalism. After his studies he moved to India to start his freelance career as a photographer and feature writer. His photography has appeared in The New York Times, Time Magazine, Newsweek and Stern among others. Daniel received the Award of Excellence of the Alexia Foundation, has been nominated for the UNICEF Picture of the Year Award and won an Award of Excellence at POYI in 2012. He is currently based in Istanbul.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken after the rebels took over Tripoli and Gaddafi was still on the run. The city was chaotic. Running water, electricity and food were scarce. Every day skirmishes between the few leftover loyalist and rebels broke out. In an abandoned hospital scores of bodies were piled in rooms. Some apparently executed, some were left behind to die. Yet, joyous over the inevitable ouster of Gaddafi and hopeful of the future, Libyans took to the streets every day to celebrate their freedom. I shot this photo on Martyr Square, formerly known as Green Square, where most demonstrations were held. Libya is  quite a conservative country. Even in Tripoli, you normally don’t see a lot of women on the street. This day was different. Thousand of mothers and daughters celebrated their victory. Many of them had lost their brothers, sons or husbands in the revolution. The few men who were there, were cautiously guarding the celebrations from the side. Another thing was different. At the time, celebrations normally meant a lot of shots fired in the air. Young men and guns. On this evening the voices and chants were louder than the guns.”

Condition ONE- A New Form of Multimedia April 10, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Libya.
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Dennis Danfung and Patrick Chauvel been documenting war for years, first with still photographs, then in motion, culminating with the award-winning documentary Hell and Back Again. Still, he found himself unsatisfied, feeling that coverage of war was becoming “mundane, almost ordinary,” he says. “Society was numb to the images of conflict.” An idea was born: Condition ONE, an app to provide a new form of storytelling. “It combines the power of the still image, the narrative of films and the emotional engagement of tactile experiences to create a new language that is so immersive, it will shake viewers out of their numbness to traditional media and provide them a powerful emotional experience. Instead of opening a window to glimpse another world, we are attempting to bring the viewer into that world as an active participant.” Condition ONE, under development for the Apple iPad and other tablets, uses a custom camera system developed by Dennis that “fuses the ethics, method and aesthetics of photojournalism with the tradition of cinematic film-making with virtual reality. The entire human field of view is captured on these camera systems, and the stories are edited specifically for the tablet application to create a truly immersive experience.”

Jason Florio March 20, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Libya.
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Libya, 2004

Jason Florio (b.1965, England) has been based in New York since 1996. He apprenticed with a number of top NYC fashion photographers, but soon decided that ‘realism’ was his real calling. In 2000 he crossed Taliban controlled Afghanistan and in August 2001 he photographed the Taliban opposition forces; returning to NYC on Sept 5th to be at the foot of the Twin Towers as they collapsed. Since then he has worked all across the Middle East, Africa and South America for publications including The New Yorker, Outside, Men’s Journal and The New York Times.  He returns yearly to his ‘other home’, The Gambia where he has been producing large format black and white portraits for the past 12 years, documenting the people who live around a sacred area of land called ‘Makasutu’. He has had a number of solo exhibits in NYC, and his work is in the permanent collection of The Brooklyn Museum of art.

About the Photograph:

“In 2004 I received a grant through The Aperture Foundation to produce the first ever assigned story for the magazine in their fifty year history. I was told that I could create my ‘dream’ assignment, which was both an exhilarating and frightening prospect. I wanted to go somewhere that had not had a lot of recent coverage and was emerging on the global stage. So I decided to produce a piece on Libya,  with the initial title in my head of ‘The Emerging Youth of LIbya’. So my focus on arrival was to find the youth, see what they were up to, what influenced them, what it was like to grow up under the shadow of Quadaffi, and how they related to the ‘outside’ world.  (more…)

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