jump to navigation

Rodrigo Cruz July 3, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


The Day of the Dead

Rodrigo Cruz (b.1974, Mexico) is a photographer based in Mexico. His work is included in the exhibition and editorial project Labyrinth of Glances: Frictions and Conflicts in Iberoamerica of Casa America Catalunya and AECID. His pictures have been published in National Geographic – Latin America edition, Enjeux Internationaux, Calgary Herald and others. Rodrigo has received awards in Mexico and was awarded a grant to participate in the Program of Formation of Photo-Essays 2007-2008, summoned by Regional Fund for the Culture and Arts of the Central Zone and CONACULTA, Mexico. He is a member of the Mexican collective Mondaphoto.

About the photograph:

“Between 2005 and 2008 I documented the rituals and daily life of indigenous people in Southern Mexico including Nahuas, Mixtecos and Tlapanecos. This photograph was made during one of the most important celebrations in the country, where every November 2nd, the communities celebrate the Day of the Dead.  On this day the deceased come back to visit and share with their relatives who have the privilege to be alive. It is a communitarian festivity where the people go to the cemetery during the day and night bringing along band music, candles, flowers, food, alcohol, cigarettes, prayers, songs and fireworks to offer and share with their deceased relatives.”

Caroline Bennett March 25, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
1 comment so far


Santa Martha Acatitla Female Penitentiary, Mexico

Caroline Bennett (b. 1983, USA) is a freelance photographer-turning-multimedia journalist currently based in Latin America, where she has worked on a variety of assignments and projects throughout the region for international and US-based media, NGO’s and private clients. She holds a dual B.A. in Documenting International Culture & Society (photojournalism based) and Political Science from Colorado College. When not shooting, Caroline has also worked at the Maine Photographic Workshops, Art Workshops Guatemala, and as a photo- editor  for several US national magazines. She is currently based in Quito, Ecuador, and is pursuing a long-term project on the Ecuador/Colombia border.

About the Photograph:

“This is an image from Born Behind Bars, a project started in Mexico City on children who live in prison systems with their incarcerated mothers. Among the inmates at the Santa Martha Acatitla female penitentiary- one of D.F.’s roughest- are women serving sentences for murder, drug dealing and kidnapping. Fifty  children also live inside the prison with their incarcerated mothers. While prison may seem an unacceptable place to raise a child, the Mexican government has decided it will allow babies born behind bars to stay with their mothers until age six, rather than be turned over to foster homes or unprepared relatives. Inside the prison, moms serving long sentences dread the day when their child is tossed out upon turning six, and many struggle financially to care for them while they are there.” (more…)

Nanna Krueztmann January 7, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
1 comment so far


Oaxaca, Mexico

Nanna kreutzmann (born 1975) is a Danish photojournalist who graduated from the Danish School of Journalism 2007. She took up photography during her Bachelor degree in art history. As a freelance photographer her work has been published in various magazines and in most major Danish newspapers. Nanna is also working on long-term projects and exhibitions.

About the Photograph:

“Vicente is four years old and lives in a rural area in Oaxaca, Mexico. It is a part of my reportage about the human consequences of migration- for those left behind in Mexico. It is said that between 11 and 12 million Mexicans are working in the USA and every year around 400.000 Mexicans are leaving their homes and heading north to the United States searching for work. Vicente is from a family of seven children, so poor that they cannot afford for a family member to cross the border to the USA. They live in extreme poverty. Most of the men who leave are hoping for a job so they can send money home. Women and children are left up to several years  alone and risk losing their husbands, who may choose to stay in  the USA or disappear in the desert crossing the boarder. The Mexicans have a saying; Poor Mexico, So far from God, so close to USA.”

Timothy Fadek June 13, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags: , ,
2 comments


Dance Hall. Juárez, Mexico

Timothy Fadek is a photojournalist based in New York City. He began his career in December 1998, covering the presidential campaign and election in Venezuela, on assignment for the Associated Press. Since then, he has photographed conflicts in Iraq, Lebanon, Kosovo, Macedonia, Israel, the Palestinian Territories, Haiti, the 9/11 attack in New York and regularly covers important political and social issues. His photographs and stories have been published in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, German Geo, Le Monde, and Stern, among others. He has won a number of awards, including Pictures of the Year (POY), NPPA Year in Pictures, the CARE Prize for Humanitarian Reportage, Communication Arts photo annual, American Photography annual, and recently, American Photo named him a hero of photography. Timothy also teaches photography as an adjunct professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was made inside a dance hall, with women lined up and waiting for men to ask them to dance. The women charge 5 pesos, approximately 50 cents (U.S.) for a dance. I was wandering the streets one night, trying to capture the sleaze and atmosphere of the city. I had heard about Ficherias (dance halls), wandered in, sat down, had a beer, and observed the scene.”

There is a saying in the area that, if you want to find Juárez, located just across the border from El Paso, Texas, just follow the crosses. Fadek made several trips to the troubled Mexican border town Juárez, to document a ghastly legacy — the murders of hundreds of women over the past decade. “Once you get into the grips of the Mexican authorities it’s a black hole, and you can simply disappear. You just want to be invisible. You can’t trust anyone in this city. Every journalist who ever does this story eventually becomes paranoid. Every person on the street becomes suspicious.” Most Americans are unaware that this city has been the center of an epidemic of horrific crimes against women and girls. Since 1993, more than 450 young women, many of them workers at U.S. and foreign assembly plants, have been murdered in this tough Mexican-border factory city. Hundreds more women have disappeared. The victims are kidnapped, raped, and mutilated before being killed, their bodies then dumped in the dusty fields in the surrounding desert areas of the city.

Yannis Kontos April 14, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Border Crossing. Nogales, Mexico

Yannis Kontos was born in Ioannina, Greece in 1971. He has been associated with Sygma (1998-2000) Gamma (2001-2002) and Polaris Images from its inception to date. Yannis completed in depth work from Palestine and Israel to West Sahara and Sierra Leone, and from North Korea and Indonesia to Iran, Iraq and Colombia. His photographs, texts and interviews have been published in Time, Newsweek, Life, The New York Times, Stern, Der Spiegel, Paris Match, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Observer, Geo, etc. Selected awards include: World Press Photo, Fujifilm European Press Photographer of the Year, Europe, UNICEF Photo of the Year Award, Visa Pour l’image, Picture of the Year and the Life magazine Alfred Eisenstaedt Awards Pictures of the year. His recent book is about North Korea.

About the Photograph:

This man peers out the window of a restaurant, towards the border fence at Nogales, where crosses that memorialize immigrants killed while crossing the border hang. Hundreds of undocumented immigrants lose their lives in the Arizona desert each year. This essay focuses on the long and difficult journey of the thousands of, mainly, Mexicans that walk 80km in the desert in search of employment in the US, in search of the American Dream. Almost 4,000 people cross the border daily and walk for more than three days under extreme temperatures to reach the nearest American city.

Janet Jarman March 30, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

jarman_mexico_1.jpg
Day of the Revolution. Izamal, Mexico

Based in Mexico, Janet Jarman has worked extensively in Latin America and Asia. In addition to assignment work, Jarman has produced various documentary projects which explore immigration issues, globalization and the possibility for sustainable development. Her photographs have been published in Geo, Smithsonian, National Geographic Traveler, Newsweek and Fortune in addition to other publications. Her work has received awards from: Pictures of the Year International, PDN’s Photography Annual, Communication Arts Photography Annual & Best Of Photo Journalism.

About the Photograph:

I vividly remember taking this photo. I was on a travel assignment for the New York Times on UNESCO World Heritage sites in Mexico. Since I was basically street shooting in Izamal, I was quite happy and relieved to find a local parade going on once I drove into town. At the same time though, I was frustrated, since it was getting into the late morning, and the light was unfavorable. I walked with the parade for at least an hour, knowing that I had to keep pushing to find a creative or unusual angle. these types of events are full of the cliché. I had almost given up on the light, when magically, some light clouds rolled in to diffuse things and make colors pop better. Then, this group of girls in red skirts stopped in front of the yellow wall!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,748 other followers