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Jesse Neider January 25, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Morocco.
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From a project about Autism. Rabat, Morocco 2012

Jesse Neider (b. 1981, USA) holds a Master’s in Photojournalism from Syracuse University. He has collaborated with various domestic non-profit organizations as well as NGO’s in South Africa and Haiti. In 2012, Jesse partnered with an anthropologist from Columbia University and was awarded a grant to begin a documentary about autism in Morocco. A frequent contributor to The Wall Street Journal, his clients have also included NPR, The New York Times, Inc. Magazine, The Weather Channel, ESPN, and Bloomberg Magazine. Jesse previously ran international workshops for Pulitzer Prize winning photographer David Turnley. He was selected for Eddie Adams XXII in 2009, and was named a 2010 Artist Fellow by the Connecticut Board of Culture and Tourism. He is based in Connecticut.

About the Photograph:

“In 2010, a medical anthropologist conducting research on autism in Morocco contacted me to see if I would be interested in documenting his work. Having personal experience with an autistic aunt, and a firm belief that autism is one of the new millennium’s most significant global public health issues; I was excited to pursue such an important project. Morocco is the site of an important experiment in global autism activism. Since 1999, there have been increasing efforts in raising public awareness, training of experts, and creating an infrastructure for detecting, diagnosing and educating children as autistic.”

“I made this picture of Yehya, a beautifully spirited nine year-old boy with autism, as he used his fingers to “dance” with the beam of sunlight streaming into his bedroom window in the capital city of Rabat. Despite his inability to form cohesive sentences and days filled with extreme mood swings, I was always touched when I witnessed the moments it seemed Yehya felt a sense of inner peace or joy. I am looking forward to returning to Morocco this year to continue documenting this complex and personal story.”

Jerome Lorieau June 18, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Morocco.
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Essaouira, Morocco 2011

Jerome Lorieau (b. 1971, France) focuses on the cultural relationship that people have with their environment and how it affects and influences their everyday life and that of their community. In recent years he has mainly traveled in Morocco and Nepal working on two separate long term projects about the Medinas of Morocco and the Gurung people in Nepal. His last exhibition was in June 2011 at the Nepalese festival in Paris. His photographs have been published in: Le Monde Voyage, Real Travel, Chine Plus, Amateur Photographer, National Geographic books, among others. He is currently based in Bristol England.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of an on-going long term project called Medinas of Morocco: Between Tradition and Modernity. It aims to explore the Medina’s culture and traditions while trying to understand how the modernization of Morocco impacts them over the year. At sunset, Moroccan people and tourists usually gather to enjoy the view over the Atlantic sea from La Skala, a fortified part of the Medina. This part of the city was built in the 18th century as part of the modern city to extend its commercial position in Morocco and internationally. Essaouira used to have important trade links with European countries which has been replaced by tourism in recent years. This in part has resulted in foreigners buying Moroccan Riads, traditional Moroccan houses, inside the Medina at prices most Moroccan’s can’t afford.”

Stefan Rohner December 15, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Morocco.
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Tangier, Morocco

Stefan Rohner (b. 1962,  Germany), is a self-thought photographer,whom’s first artistic love was free style painting. In the mid -eighties, he was inspired by the neo expressionist movement called “Junge Wilde” in Berlin, to work on big oil paintings. After a couple of years he moved to Ibiza, Spain, where he still lives, producing his first photografic work in his home laboratory in 1999. Over the years, Rohner has perfected the art of hand made printing on baryta paper, he inherits a passion for structure, grain and feel, along with his obvious knack for precise composition in black and white, from his experience as painter. Remaining true to his principles which inspire his photographic work, the respect of the human being in fron of the lens, lately he has moved to a different, more distant  approach, in colour, documenting the change within societies.

About the Photograph:
Morocco is always friendly and colorful to me. Women work, men drink tea… that’s the feeling I get when seeing only men sitting around in public bars and most of the time it’s their reality, men only, playing cards, smoking joints or staring at a big TV screen, they will sit there for hours with one glass of mint tea. You can also spot the most funny decorations, modern Western Hollywood film heros or Western musicians, mixed to pictures of lord Krishna and Shiva decipting Indian religious figures, for example. It is always a pleasure to sit with them, to talk to the customers and bar owners, or only to observe.

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