jump to navigation

Farhad Berahman March 20, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nepal.
Tags:
comments closed


Wedding band rehearsing. Bhaktapur, Nepal 2006

Farhad Berahman (b. 1981, Iran) is a documentary photographer based in the Middle East and the UK specializing in social documentary, travel and editorial photography. He began his professional career with Associated Press in the UAE and Middle East in 2006. Farhad was nominated from the World Press Photo as the best young talented photographer in the MENA region in 2009 and his work has appeared in publications around the globe such as The New York Times, The Guardian, Figaro, The Washington Post and El Pais.

About the Photograph:

“It was the third month of my journey through Asia, when I had to go to Nepal to change my visa and return back to India. I was amazed by the beauty of Nepal- the views of  the Himalaya’s, the architecture and culture. The most interesting place, which made me stay longer, was the ancient city of Bhaktapur, known as the Living Heritage. It was a Friday afternoon when I was walking through this historical place and I heard a music playing from far away. I walked through the narrow streets to find the source. There was a band rehearsing for a wedding. They specialized in performing at weddings, festivals, and street processions. Their role has been vital from the very beginning of times, as it signified the groom traveling miles to bring the bride home with the sound of joy. The music lifted the spirits of all in the wedding parade that followed.”

Zakaria Zainal October 14, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nepal.
Tags:
comments closed


Retired Singapore Gurkhas, Dharan and Pokhara Nepal 2011

Zakaria Zainal (b. 1985, Singapore) graduated from the School of Communication, Nanyang Technological University in 2010.  His work has been published in The Straits Times, Nepali Times and The Invisible Photographer Asia among others. His photographs have also been exhibited at the 3rd Singapore International Photography Festival, Valentine Willie Fine Art Gallery, The Philanthropic Museum and the upcoming Dali International Photography Festival. In 2012, he published his first monograph: Our Gurkhas: Singapore Through Their Eyes, an anthology of portraits and anecdotes of the retired Singapore Gurkha and also organized a traveling exhibi in Nepal of the work.

About the Photograph:

“These two photographs are part of a series titled “Our Gurkhas”. In 2011, I spent three months visiting three states in Nepal searching, interviewing and photographing Singapore Gurkhas. When people talk about the Gurkhas, they mainly refer to those from the British or Indian army. Little is known about the stories and memories of those Gurkhas who have served in the Singapore Gurkha Contingent. Working with the Singapore Gurkhas Pensioners’ Association (SGPA), I would refer to a telephone list of the Gurkhas. There were some numbers I could not call, because some were already dead or have moved overseas with their families. Both Mr Youm (left) and Mr Bhabindra (right) were kind enough to share with me what they could remember from their time in serving Singapore. Through their foreign eyes, they witnessed the rapid pace of change of this small island they once called home. In their current homes, both in Dharan and Pokhara respectively, they adorn their houses with tangible memories of Singapore — especially photographs of them in uniform.”

Greg Constantine January 6, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nepal.
Tags:
comments closed


Southern Nepal, 2008

Greg Constantine (b. 1970, USA) has been based in Southeast Asia since early 2006. For the last four years, he has been working on a project entitled, Nowhere People, which documents the struggles of stateless people around the world.  His photo essays have been widely published and he has been the recipient of numerous international awards, including POYi and NPPA Best of Photojournalism.  In 2008 he received the SOPA Award for Feature Photography from the Society of Publishers in Asia, an Amnesty International Human Rights Press Award and the Harry Chapin Media Award for Photojournalism. In 2009, Greg was part of a team of journalists from the International Herald Tribune who received the Osborn Elliott Prize for Journalism on Asia presented annually by the Asia Society.  Most recently, Greg was a recipient of a 2009 Open Society Institute Distribution Grant.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken in a remote Dalit village in southern Nepal. It is part of my long-term project on stateless people, called Nowhere People.  Before 2007, some four million people in southern Nepal (in a region along the border called the Terai) had been denied Nepalese citizenship for generations.  After the monarchy was overthrown and in the creation of a ‘New Nepal’, some 2.6 million people in the Terai were finally issued Nepalese citizenship, yet hundreds of thousands of the poorest and most vulnerable found themselves excluded, primarily because of deep-rooted caste-based discrimination.  Large numbers of Dalit or ‘untouchables’ were among the people who were left behind.   While the Terai region is the breadbasket of Nepal, and while Dalit are the ones who primarily work the land in the Terai, little or no resources are allocated to the Dalit in the region.”

(more…)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,428 other followers