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Tiana Markova-Gold July 1, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nigeria.
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Gbagada Senior Grammar School in Lagos, Nigeria 2009

Tiana Markova-Gold (b.1974, United States) is a documentary photographer based in Brooklyn. She received a NY Times Scholarship to attend the full-time Photojournalism Program at ICP in 2006-07. Since the spring of 2007, she has been working on an in-depth project about the lives of women in prostitution. This project has included work in the United States, Macedonia and Morocco. Her work has earned several fellowships and grants including a Camera Club of New York Darkroom Residency, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Photography and the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Her first solo show Scènes et Types, featuring her work in Morocco recently opened at the Camera Club of New York.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photograph during an annual Junior Kudra empowerment workshop for young women facilitated by Kudirat Initiative for Democracy (KIND). Hasfat Abiola-Costello founded KIND in Lagos, Nigeria in 1997 to honor Kudirat Abiola, her mother and a leading democracy activist who was killed by soldiers during the period of military rule. The Junior Kudra Program is an expansion of KIND’s Young Women Leadership Program. The name KUDRA is a derivation of the Arabic “Qudra” that symbolizes power. The name conveys the program’s intention to help restore young women to their full potential by empowering them with information, leadership skills and tools to effectively engage in transforming their lives, communities and eventually their nation.”

Sergio Ramazzotti October 22, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nigeria.
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Ego, a rural village near Benin City, Nigeria 2009

Sergio Ramazzotti (b.1965 , Italy) he has written and photographed more than two hundred stories in as many countries for most of the leading Italian and international magazines. As a writer and novelist, he published Vado verso il capo (Feltrinelli 1996), currently used as a textbook at the IULM University in Milano, where he is a regular lecturer at the Faculty of Sociology. His other books include: Afrozapping, a collection of African stories (2006), the novel Tre ore all’alba , set in Iraq (2005). His book on Afghanistan titled Afghanistan 2.0 was just published. In 2005 he won the Enzo Baldoni Prize for Journalism of the Province of Milano, and the International Photography Award (Los Angeles) in the “Editorial” category. He is one of the founders of the photojournalism agency Parallelo zero.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is from a feature I shot in Nigeria titled ‘Stories of ordinary slavery’. Every year, at least 50,000 girls travel from Nigeria (mostly from Benin City, one of the country’s poorest cities) to Europe. A trafficker, with the help of a voodoo, or juju, priest, who makes them swear an oath of allegiance and convinces them that a decent job awaits them in the promised land. The journey is often nightmarish, trying to reach the coast of Italy or Spain on a precarious rubber boat. Many of the girls die of fatigue or drown at sea before reaching their destination. Those who make it, soon realize that the promised job does not exist: after their papers are seized by the traffickers, they are sent on the street as prostitutes. Sometimes, one of them manages to escape her captors and, back in Nigeria, to find the courage to denounce the people who trafficked her. This is the situation in the photograph: the girl on the left, barely 20 years old, is confronting the woman who sold her to the traffickers, after the police has taken both of them to the juju shrine, where the oath has been revoked.”

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Samantha Appleton April 3, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nigeria.
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Makoko Slum. Lagos, Nigeria

Samantha Appleton works primarily on long-term projects including recent work in the Middle East and illegal immigration in America. She has won numerous awards from POY and the World Press Photo. Her clients include Time magazine and The New Yorker. Samantha has worked on stories as varied as the conflict in Iraq, Malaria in Africa and fishing communities of Maine. She began her journalism career as a writer and became a full time photographer after assisting James Nachtwey in 1999-2000. Since then she has been named one of the “30 Under 30″ photographers featured in PDN and received the Kodak Professional Award. She is currently a member of the NOOR photo agency.

About the Photograph:

“The Megacity of Lagos, Nigeria is a teeming cluster of slums that continues to grow exponentially and will soon become the third largest city in the world. Lagos is urban poverty at its most horrific, in a country with one of the world’s largest oil supplies. People have built up their own towns and social systems in the wake of complete governmental abandonment. Nigeria does not provide the most basic of services.  Indentured slavery is standard, health care is non-existent, and corruption is the only system.”

The Atlantic Monthly March 14, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nigeria.
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murphy_nigeria.jpg
God’s Country in Nigeria, Photo by Seamus Murphy

In the March issue of The Atlantic Monthly there is an excellent piece on religious strife in Nigeria by photographer Seamus Murphy. It’s good to see more space allocated in publications devoted to quality documentary photography in the USA. The Atlantic Monthly is partnering with Frontline World/ Flash Point in featuring audio slide shows narrated by the photographers of photo-essays published in the magazine.

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