jump to navigation

Maddie McGarvey August 26, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags: ,
comments closed


From story about Lyme Disease, Vermont 2013

Maddie McGarvey (b. 1990, United States) graduated from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication with a degree in photojournalism in 2012. Maddie has interned for the San Francisco Chronicle and was a staff photographer at the Burlington Free Press in Vermont until August of 2013. She is now a freelance photographer based in Columbus, Ohio. Maddie was the recipient of the LUCEO Student Project Award and the James R. Gordon Ohio Understanding Award in 2011. She has been recognized by College Photographer of the Year, Hearst, and was runner-up Ohio Student Photographer of the Year in 2011. She was nominated for the Joop Swart Master Class in 2013 and attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2011. She has been published in Once Magazine, AARP Bulletin, The Washington Post, CNN.com, Education Week, USA Today and The Today Show.

About the Photograph:

“This is a photo of Greg Soll, a vegetable farmer in Vermont who was afflicted with Lyme Disease. One tick bite seriously affected the way he lived and worked for a long time. Farmers are used to putting in 14-18 hour days and suddenly he was constantly exhausted and couldn’t even use his right arm. He had to fight with doctors to even give him a Lyme test and unfortunately this has become a norm. More and more farmers are contracting Lyme disease and less doctors will diagnose and treat it. I spent the day with Greg while he farmed. While things are mostly back to normal for him, he still gets tired easily and has to take breaks often. But because farming is his way of sustaining himself and making a living, he fights through the pain and exhaustion to get his work done.”

Ian Bates February 28, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Club-goers leaving after a fight broke out and guns were fired, Greenwood, Mississippi 2012

Ian Bates (b. 1992, United States) grew up in North Brunswick, New Jersey. In elementary school he received a cheap point and shoot film camera to bring on a field trip to the zoo, but didn’t realize his love for the photograph until later began taking photography classes in his sophomore year in high school. The images became a way to store memories with truth and without them fading away. He is now a junior at Ohio University working on his bachelor of science in visual communication with an emphasis in photojournalism and a Specialization in Sociology. He recently was awarded a Silver in both the General News and Feature categories in the 67th College Photographer of the Year awards. He has worked for The New York Times, Reuters, The Athens NEWS and The Asbury Park Press. Ian resides in Athens, Ohio

About the Photograph:

“I was lucky enough to have an opportunity to spend my summer working with freelance photographer Matt Eich over the summer of 2012. One of the first times I got to make pictures was the night this picture was made. Matt got invited to go to the club for one of the Baptist Town resident’s birthday party so I tagged along. The club was a metal, warehouse type building with mixed color lights out front. The inside was dark with back lights and a mirror across one wall of the dance floor. People were drinking, dancing and having fun as you would assume they would at a birthday party.”

“Then, all of a sudden, there was a weird tension throughout the whole room. Something was up and in less then a minute a fight broke out. Most didn’t want to get involved and backed away to where the tables and chairs were and some went outside. The security guards broke the fight up and kicked the participants out. Minutes later there were gunshots outside in the parking lot. People ran inside the club screaming, knocking over tables and chairs and then the lights were turned on. During the next five to ten minutes everyone stood around waiting to see what would happen next. Two weeks earlier the club had been shot up by the same crew that started the fight with the Baptist Town boys. We were soon ushered out by security guards into the parking lot where there were police officers waiting outside. The image above was from when people were being ushered out of the club. Just as the night began, in an instant, it was over.”

Angela Shoemaker May 25, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Holland, Ohio University.
Tags:
comments closed


Nursing home, Amsterdam 2010

Angela Shoemaker (b. 1978, USA) is a freelance photographer based in Louisville, Kentucky. After pursuing a master’s degree at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication, Angela was awarded a Fulbright grant to complete a long-term documentary project in Amsterdam. The project focused on a nursing home for aging drug addicts. Some of her other work includes award winning projects on prison nurseries and families struggling with homelessness. She is currently in Kenya shooting video about underground music in overlooked corners of the world.

About the Photograph:

“While the United States was in the midst of the national health care debate, I was photographing a fringe element of the socialized health system in the Netherlands—the residents of a nursing home for aging drug addicts. The institution was tucked away at the outer edge of Amsterdam, thousands of miles from Washington, but the discussion remained about our medical system. The residents were perplexed by the issue and asked if it was true that Americans died because they had no access to health care. This was in comparison to their own health care, which allowed them to continue their unconventional lifestyles, consumed by drug abuse, without denying them access to the care they needed. I was there for several months shooting a documentary about the lives of these residents, some of who have been using heroin and crack cocaine for over 20 years.”

Rachel Mummey February 14, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Urban Dreams. Iowa City, USA 2010

Rachel Mummey (b.1983, United States) has spent the last two years working towards a Master’s in Photography from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Her work has been featured in Photo District News and News Photographer magazines and online at New York Times Lens Blog, The Neiman Storyboard, Multimedia Muse and Kobre Guide websites. Most recently she was awarded as the 65th College Photographer of the Year with stories placing gold and silver in the documentary category as well as gold in individual multimedia story. She was awarded the 2010 Kit King Scholarship by the National Press Photographer’s Association. Pictures of the Year International recognized her photography in 2009. Currently she’s interning at The Palm Beach Post.

About the Photograph:

“I made this image while documenting a project about youth in families who have moved to Iowa City, Iowa from Chicago. I returned to my hometown after moving away for graduate school to find myself looking at my community with an outsider’s perspective. I heard many people from my community making blanket generalizations about socio-economically disadvantaged families who were moving from Chicago. I wanted to bear witness to these families lives just to see what their lives were like. Historically, railroads, rivers and other barriers have segregated towns, like Iowa City, all across the United States. This was a program called Urban Dreams that teaches disadvantaged youth how to ride horses. The program was only up and running for a handful of weeks before it fell apart. This particular image is when Arthur first meets the horse he is going to learn to ride. Although it was clear that he and the other kids were out of their element, they protested that they knew how to ride horses already. I was trying to contrast the urban culture with the rural environment.”

Bryan Thomas January 17, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Nelsonville, Ohio 2010

Bryan Thomas (b. 1982, USA) is completing a master’s degree at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. Bryan graduated from Dartmouth College with a degree in English, in 2005.  Following college, Bryan worked on the editorial at GQ Magazine for over two years; ultimately, returning to school in the fall of 2008.  He has  since taken classes at the School of Visual Arts, the International Center of Photography, and the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. Bryan interned at The Concord Monitor and attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2010. He’s been recognized by PDNedu, Sportsshooter.com, and The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar. His work has been exhibited at the Getty Images Gallery in London. In January 2011, he’ll begin a six-month internship at the St. Petersburg Times.”

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken in Nelsonville, Ohio during the winter of 2010.  After driving around with a group of teenagers looking for a fight, Sean Stump was leaning out the window of a friend’s car to see if his opponent was going to show up.  During that winter, I’d begun a project “The Things We Did While You Were Gone” about growing up in the town of Carbondale, Ohio.  Carbondale, like many towns in Southeast Ohio, was a former coal town that, after decades of relative success, had fallen into decline and disrepair since the extractive industry had left town. The odds facing these kids were staggering. At least one-third of Carbondale was living below the poverty line, the median age of a household was only 26 (ten years below the national average) and a combination of drug-addiction, crime, and/or disability had effected almost all of the households where I spent time.” (more…)

Michael Christopher Brown November 20, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, Russia.
Tags:
comments closed


Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Sakhalin Island, Russia

Michael Christopher Brown (b. 1977, USA)  moved to New York and began working as a freelance photographer in 2006. He has worked for publications such as Fortune, The Atlantic, ESPN The Magazine, Financial Times, GEO France, Conde Nast Portfolio, Time, National Geographic Magazine, The Economist, Monocle, Smithsonian, Ventiquattro, The Nature Conservancy and The New York Times. When not on assignment he can be found driving around China in his modified bread van, taking pictures with the iPhone and Kodak films.

About the Photograph:

“I first traveled to Sakhalin Island, Russia, to work on an editorial piece about the island’s energy riches, which, since the 90’s, sparked a booming economy from this tired outpost in Russia’s lost eastern frontier. As the majority of the population was living in broken, rusted skeletons of communities formerly dominated by fishing, timber and coal industries, I tried to photograph a changing psyche in the air. The young couple in this photograph were at The Chameleon bar in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, the capital city of Sakhalin. All the young people here knew each other. I knew someone who knew the owner of the bar and nearly everyone in the room, so I was able to walk around and photograph everything. No one paid me any attention.”

Peter Hoffman July 16, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Tribute to Rachel, Chicago 2010

Peter Hoffman (b. 1984, USA) is a Chicago based photographer. Originally studying advertising, he switched paths and received his graduate degree in photography from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. His personal work is split between environmental and issue based explorations, and autobiographical work that began with documenting a stint living an idyllic life of surfing and exploring New Zealand. Recent recognition includes work included in the upcoming American Photography Annual 26, and placements in Px3 (Paris), the International Photography Awards, College Photographer of the Year (General News) and others. Clients include The Wall St. Journal, The National (Abu Dhabi), HIV+ Magazine, Grazia (U.K.), non-profit associations and others.”

About the Photograph:

“Rachel Gilliam was 25 years-old and an employee of Bowman’s Bar and Grill in the north Chicago neighborhood of Lincoln Square. Rachel was well liked by both patrons and the staff, and regularly worked during the Wednesday trivia nights. She often traveled during her time off. On Halloween night of 2009 she was the fatal victim of a hit and run, only two blocks from Bowman’s, for which the perpetrator is still on the loose. This essay, which looks at the space of her employment and friends she left behind, was commissioned by Time Out Chicago Magazine. I made this particular picture  in February 2010 as I left the bar late after photographing the Wednesday night trivia, as I had one frame left on the roll. The harsh Chicago winter was a stark contrast to the warmth of the community inside.”

Bookmark and Share

Andrew Spear June 28, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Glouster Ohio 2009

Andrew Spear (b. 1987, United States) lives in Athens, Ohio and works as a freelance photographer while continuing work on numerous personal projects. He is a recent graduate from Ohio University and has been published in national publications including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. Andrew has also been recognized by the National Press Photographers Association, The Southern Short Course in News Photography and had two images selected for American Photography 26. He also collaborated on the 2008 “Soul of Athens” project which was awarded an honorable mention in Online Publications Best Use in POYi.

About the Photograph:

“I’ve been working on a project in the town of Glouster for about a year now. Glouster was once an extremely prosperous extractive industry town in southeastern Ohio. In the early 1960s, however, the mines moved out after stripping the natural resources, taking most of the jobs and opportunity with them. As with many surrounding towns, narcotics abuse is an ever-increasing problem. I was photographing a family outside their home last spring when the girl in the red dress ran by with a ferret. One of the children asked her to stop so they could look at it and I asked what was happening because she was in such a hurry. All she told me was that her Aunt had just been arrested and asked her to take care of the pet for her. She was unsure of what charges her aunt was facing.”

Bookmark and Share

Josh Birnbaum April 30, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags: ,
comments closed


Mary Christy,  Ohio 2009

Josh Birnbaum (b. 1985, USA) is a photojournalist and rocket scientist currently living on the southeastern edge of Ohio. He graduated from the University of Illinois with a degree in Aerospace Engineering (and a minor in Mathematics) and is now finishing up his graduate degree in Visual Communication at Ohio University.  He has worked for the Oakland Tribune, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, the Omaha World-Herald and the Peoria Journal Star, and will complete his final newspaper internship this summer at the Dallas Morning News. Recent awards include College Photographer of the Year Competition Award of Excellence in Sports Feature (2009); NPPA Honorable Mention Sports Picture Story in Best of Photojournalism (2009).

About the Photograph:

“I met the Christy’s in the fall of 2008 at a bluegrass jam in Millfield, Ohio.  We became friends immediately.  In the springtime, I was invited to photograph them at their home. Mary was showing me her new bass and playing a song  for me, so I made a portrait of her in the living room.  Since this picture was taken, my relationship with the Christy’s has developed further: I have photographed them taking care of their great granddaughter in the multimedia piece, Raising Krissy. The Christy’s have become like grandparents to me.  I go over regularly for coffee and to watch westerns on TV, to play with their granddaughter Krissy,  listen to their stories and to play music with them.  Joe is trying to teach me to play banjo now.  They are wonderful, generous, and loving people and I hope to be a part of their lives for a long time to come.”

Bookmark and Share

Dave LaBelle by Francis Gardler February 7, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, Video.
1 comment so far

As part of his Masters project at Ohio University, Francis Gardler created a series or ten video clips about photographer and teacher Dave LaBelle. Plenty of valuable lessons to be learned here. I especially like this one where Dave talks about the empathy and compassion needed to photograph other human beings. The title of one of the clips: “Connecting The Eye With The Heart” sums it up perfectly.

Bookmark and Share

Ross Mantle January 15, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags: ,
comments closed


Open Swim, Camp Hill, Pittsburgh 2007

Ross Mantle (b.1985, USA) is a freelance photographer based in Pittsburgh, Pa. He holds a degree in Visual Communication from Ohio University and has worked for newspapers and on projects throughout the United States and abroad. His work has been featured in publications worldwide, including The Wall Street Journal and the New York Times among others. Ross’ personal work often focuses on the quirks of American life and the unique relationship between person and place. Ross enjoys riding bikes, eating cheap burritos and making iced tea. He’d be happy to play you in air hockey or take an assignment anywhere you may want to send him.

About the Photograph:

“I was interning for a newspaper in central Pennsylvania during the summer a couple years ago and got an assignment at this pool. Adult swim had just ended and the pool became chaotic again with kids. I saw this woman walking back across the platform. She had such a wonderful bathing suit on, one I thought you would only find in Florida, and it matched the color of the paint perfectly. So I made a couple frames, then the two girls popped in from the sides and this frame came together. There’s something so timeless and nostalgic about public swimming pools. I feel like the scene in this photo is one of a very typical suburban American summer. The paper never ran it though, I think they said it would be unflattering.”

Bookmark and Share

Maisie Crow December 9, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Tom Rose, Athens, Ohio 2008

Maisie Crow (b. 1982, USA ) is a graduate student in the School of Visual Communication at Ohio University. In 2009, she won The Ian Parry Scholarship and The Pierre and Alexandra Boulat Grant. Maisie was also runner-up College Photographer of the Year in 2009. She is featured in the Emerging Talent section of Reportage by Getty Images. She spent the summer of 2009 as the photography intern at The Boston Globe and is currently interning at MediaStorm. Before attending graduate school, she worked as a photographer at the Patuxent Publishing Company in Columbia, Maryland. Maisie received her undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin and studied for a semester at the Salt Institute of Documentary Studies.

About the Photograph:

“I met Tom Rose by chance and asked if I could make his portrait. I arrived at his house the following day. He told me that a few months earlier he had lost Mary, his wife of sixty years. He was having a hard time dealing with his loss, and we spent a lot of time talking about it.  Over the course of the next eight months I continued to visit him and take pictures. He taught me a great deal about life and gave me the opportunity to share his story. This photo was taken during one of his frequent visits to Mary’s grave in Athens, Ohio, about a month after I met him. This was an important photograph because of the inherent difficulties of representing someone who has died. The grave is the most literal visual reference of his loss.”

Editors Note: Take a look at Maisie’s excellent multimedia piece about Tom Rose in A Life Alone.

Bookmark and Share

Peter McCollough September 16, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Evangelicals praying in Flint, Michigan 2007

Peter McCollough (b. 1982, United States) is a Northern California based photographer and former Marine that received his B.S. in Visual Communication at Ohio University in 2008. While in school he completed an internship at The Flint Journal in Michigan where he photographed the effects of crime and the sport of amateur cage fighting. While a student at Ohio he attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and was awarded by CPOY, NPPA, The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar and PX3. As of late he is pursuing his strong interest in narrative film making and is currently in the post-production phase of his first short film.

About the Photograph:

“The series this photo is a part of was made during a five hour event during the first month of my newspaper internship in Flint, Michigan, in April of 2007. The cluster to the left is a group of several different churches preaching to and praying with one another. They are standing around a flatbed trailer turned into a portable makeshift stage. They spent the day traveling to different points in the city where violent crimes had occurred. They came to cleanse and bless these areas, and to evangelize to the immediate communities. The wanted to change Flint.” (more…)

Andres Gonzalez May 4, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, Ukraine.
Tags:
add a comment


Truskavets Sanatorium, Western Ukraine

Andres Gonzalez (b. 1977, United States) is currently based in Istanbul, Turkey. He is originally from California where he pursued a degree in writing from Pomona College in Claremont, California – but after a two year stint in Namibia teaching environmental education and snapping pictures along the way, he realized that photography was a much more natural way for him to express his world view. He is the recipient of the Canon Italia Young Photographer’s Award in 2009, was a Fulbright Scholar in 2008. He was selected as one of PDN’s Emerging 30 photographers in 2006. His work has been published by W Magazine, Monocle, and Wallpaper among others.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken in the resort town of Truskavets in Western Ukraine from a project I started back in 2006 called Sanatorium, which looks at the culture of health and healing in Ukraine. I was initially drawn to how Ukrainians who visit the springs  embrace the water’s healing qualities, but after I started making pictures I became fascinated by their history and legacy in Ukrainian culture. The history of sanatoria in the former Soviet Union goes back to the conception of the USSR itself, when mansions were seized by the Bolsheviks and converted to hospitals and clinics for the poor. Later sanatoria played an important role in healing a war-torn nation – after the Second World War the Soviet government encouraged its citizens to look inwards, both figuratively and literally through domestic travel, to explore the far-flung parts of the Union in hopes of cementing its commonality.” (more…)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,266 other followers