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Andrew Renneisen October 24, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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From the project “Violent Times.”  Alexander Kamara funeral. Wilmington, Del. 2012

Andrew Renneisen (b. 1992, USA) is currently enrolled at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. He is currently an intern at the Philadelphia Inquirer, and has previously worked at The Press of Atlantic City in Atlantic City, NJ and at The News Journal in Wilmington, DE. He was a recipient of the 2013 Alexia Foundation Award of Excellence for his work on Violence in the United States, and is a member of the Eddie Adams Class of XXVI. He has also received awards from the NPPA and the S.I. Newhouse School. His work has been published in The Washington Post, Denver Post, The Philadelphia Inquirer and other publications.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of my story on violence in the United States that depicts the harsh realities of violent conflict and it’s impact on local communities. It was made at the funeral of Alex Kamara, a promising 16 year old student and athlete. Alex was shot in the face by a stray bullet during a soccer tournament in Wilmington, Delaware, on a Sunday afternoon in July of 2012. The bullet was meant for the tournament’s organizer, who was going to testify in court after witnessing a murder. (He was also killed in the shooting.) In this frame, Alex’s brother, Jonathan, is carrying his brother’s casket to be moved to his final resting place. Jonathan was helped by Alex’s friends and teammates, some wearing their soccer jerseys in honor of Alex. This funeral was actually an assignment for the News Journal. The day I came to photograph was the first time I had met the Kamara family. I was surprised on how welcoming they were to have me at Alex’s funeral. I think it pushed me even harder to try to convey, in one frame, such a tragic event in this family’s life.”

Uliana Bazar September 30, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Ukrainian Church during the Baptism ceremony. Brighton Beach, Brooklyn 2012

Uliana Bazar (b.1986, Ukraine) recently graduated from the Corcoran College of Art and Design with a Masters in New Media Photojournalism. While in school Uliana completed a 6-month internship with the National Geographic Book Division and now works with them regularly as a freelance photo editor. Her work has been published by National Geographic Books, The Washington Post, NPR, Hemispheres & GO magazines, and exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. In 2013, she was recognized by both FotoDC and the Magenta Foundation. She is based in Washington, DC.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken while I was working on my Masters thesis at the Corcoran College of Art and Design. It’s part of a series for which I spent about one year, on and off, documenting the Little Odessa community in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. The Little Odessa neighborhood has a population consisting primarily of Russian, Ukrainian, and Eastern-European immigrants. Because I am originally from Ukraine I was able to get very intimate access to this community. Eventually I was accepted as family, and my subjects and I could relate to each other on a very personal level.”

“While working on this project I photographed numerous social and religious events for the community. I was always welcomed and my photography was warmly embraced. This particular image was made during a baptism ceremony in a Ukrainian Orthodox church. At the moment I made the image the baptism was taking place and these two boys were standing awkwardly and slightly bored in the back of the chapel. In Little Odessa there are many boys about this age who are eager to serve in their church, much to their parent’s pleasure. These two, however, seemed to mirror my own slightly awkward feelings I was experiencing as I watched this special ceremony unfold. It’s interesting how, after almost five years away from Ukraine, my very own culture starts to feel exotic and far away.”

Amanda Berg September 16, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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From a project on Teen Binge Drinking, Henrietta, NY 2010

Amanda Berg (b. 1989, United States) is a documentarian based in North Carolina. She graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a BFA in Photojournalism and is currently pursuing an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke University. She spent seven months interning at the Fayetteville Observer before going back to school. Her work has been recognized by the Alexia Foundation, Eddie Adams Workshop, Pingyao International Photography Festival, North Carolina Press Association, featured in TIME Online and exhibited at 25 CPW Gallery. Her current projects explore women’s football, the crossroads of military and civilian life and her own familial memory.

About the Photograph:

“This picture is from a project I began during my junior year of college about the gender dynamics of undergraduate binge drinking. The series is meant to question gender-neutral drinking norms by taking into consideration recent studies that have shown an increase in female drinking and higher rates of the negative side effects associated. I took this particular picture early on in the project at a St Patrick’s Day Party my roommates held at our apartment. It was one of the first times I can remember watching a moment unfold behind my camera, waiting for the women’s dancing legs to reveal all three of the men’s faces. I waited so long I ran out of space on my memory card, snuck away to my bedroom to replace it and came back to continue photographing the scene.”

Maddie McGarvey August 26, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
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From story about Lyme Disease, Vermont 2013

Maddie McGarvey (b. 1990, United States) graduated from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication with a degree in photojournalism in 2012. Maddie has interned for the San Francisco Chronicle and was a staff photographer at the Burlington Free Press in Vermont until August of 2013. She is now a freelance photographer based in Columbus, Ohio. Maddie was the recipient of the LUCEO Student Project Award and the James R. Gordon Ohio Understanding Award in 2011. She has been recognized by College Photographer of the Year, Hearst, and was runner-up Ohio Student Photographer of the Year in 2011. She was nominated for the Joop Swart Master Class in 2013 and attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2011. She has been published in Once Magazine, AARP Bulletin, The Washington Post, CNN.com, Education Week, USA Today and The Today Show.

About the Photograph:

“This is a photo of Greg Soll, a vegetable farmer in Vermont who was afflicted with Lyme Disease. One tick bite seriously affected the way he lived and worked for a long time. Farmers are used to putting in 14-18 hour days and suddenly he was constantly exhausted and couldn’t even use his right arm. He had to fight with doctors to even give him a Lyme test and unfortunately this has become a norm. More and more farmers are contracting Lyme disease and less doctors will diagnose and treat it. I spent the day with Greg while he farmed. While things are mostly back to normal for him, he still gets tired easily and has to take breaks often. But because farming is his way of sustaining himself and making a living, he fights through the pain and exhaustion to get his work done.”

Annie Flanagan August 8, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Purple Orchid Lady. Monroe, New York 2012

Annie Flanagan (b. 1986, United States)  graduated from Ohio University’s Visual Communication program in 2009, Annie took to exploring the world around her and documenting it along the way. Her work has been recognized by CPOY (Silver, Spot News), The Alexia Foundation for World Peace and Cultural Understanding Student Grant (Award of Excellence). This past July she began graduate school at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

About the Photograph:

“I met Sam last summer at the racetrack in Brewerton, NY. He was in the pit with his family, racing against his son, grandsons and great-granddaughter. ‘I do it because I love the speed,’ he told me, ‘Speed has been my life since I was little.’ Sam drove his first car at seven and began racing when he was 18. Now at 83 he is still racing. That summer he was recovering from the loss of his wife Doris, who passed away that December. Her favorite color was purple, so most things in his home have tints of purple to them. She named his race car the The Purple Orchid Lady, decorating his car with a painting of a pin-up girl. On this afternoon, Sam had just finished spending a day fixing up his car with his son Billy. He came out of the garage and sat down to drink coffee and watch the storm roll in.”

Alan Chin July 4, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Gun show, Lima, Ohio 2012

Alan Chin (b. 1970, United States) was raised in New York City’s Chinatown. Since 1996, he has worked in China, the former Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, and many other places in the Middle East and Central Asia. Alan has explored the South, following the historic trail of the civil rights movement and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, covered the 2008 presidential campaign, and the Occupy Wall Street movement. He is a contributing photographer to Newsweek and The New York Times, and member of Facing Change: Documenting America (FCDA), and an editor at Newsmotion.org.

About the Photograph:

“On a typical weekend in January, 400 women about to get married went to the Lima Bride fashion show and wedding cornucopia at the downtown Veterans Memorial Convention Center. Sponsored by the local newspaper, The Lima News, caterers, dressmakers, photographers, venues, and limousine companies rented booths and hawked their services. Marriage seems to be a recession proof industry. At the Allen County Fairgrounds a few miles away, a parallel male universe of a gun show was happening at the same time. Terry Morgan, the president of the Tri-State Gun Collectors, said, ‘Guns sales are up 30% over the last two years, with an exploding increase in applications for concealed-carry permits. There’s fear of the government.’ Morgan supports castle laws which give wide latitude to the use of deadly force in the home without any need to retreat even when safe.”

Adrian Fussell June 17, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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JROTC Army Recruits. Louisville, Kentucky 2012

Adrian Fussell (b.1989, USA) is a Panamanian-American photographer based in New York City. He grew up in Switzerland, Zimbabwe, and Guatemala, following his parents and their work as American diplomats, before returning to the U.S. at age 16. While attending New York University for degrees in journalism and political science, Adrian worked as a writer and photographer for the Village Voice and for the Black AIDS Institute. In 2012 he studied photojournalism at the International Center of Photography, where he documented the world of a high school JROTC program in Queens, NY. That same year he was the recipient of the ICP George & Joyce Moss Scholarship, the Magnum Foundation: Emergency Fund Fellowship, and the Ian Parry Scholarship. He attended Eddie Adams Workshop XXV, and currently shoots for the Wall Street Journal and for Getty Images. He is also recognized on the Emerging Talent roster at Getty Images, Reportage section.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is one from a series titled My Name is Victory, on JROTC Army programs in public high schools in America. The subjects are drill team cadets from Francis Lewis High School, and they’re pictured training in a parking lot outside of their hotel in Louisville, KY. The team, called the Patriot Guard, was seeking it’s third consecutive national championship in 2012, but they placed second after a cadet dropped his rifle during the performance. In the foreground is cadet Jenny Chen, age 17 when this photo was taken, who was a squad leader and is giving the command for her cadets to march. Drill team duty requires hours of weapons handling practice and marching six days a week. The cadets spin and throw to each other their dummy Springfield 1903 rifles, World War 1 era weapons that weigh roughly nine pounds and are kept by the Francis Lewis JROTC officers in a locked closet on the school campus, located in Fresh Meadows, Queens, NYC.”

William B. Plowman April 29, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Knights of the Ku Klux Klan at the “White Pride Festival”, Indiana 2002

William B. Plowman (b. 1969, USA) is represented by REDUX and has covered stories in Latin America, Africa, Central Asia and the United States. William’s photographs can be seen in the world’s leading news & NGO publications including: le Figaro, Der Spiegel, Newsweek, Time, The Financial Times,  CNN, MSF and Reporters Without Borders among others. He is the weekly contributing photographer for NBC’s political talk show Meet the Press and his work is featured in the film Ghosts of Cite Soleil documenting the 2004 war in Haiti. His work has been recognized by the Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, POYi and the Gordon Parks Photography Competition. William is currently based in Washington, D.C. and working on a long-term project in Gary, Indiana.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photograph very early in my career in 2002. I had been researching white supremacy groups in the United States for a few months when I came across a brief mention of an event to be held on a farm in Osceloa, Indiana. It was billed as a sort of summit within the racial separatist and white supremacist communities. A three day event where leaders and supporters from around the country like the Ku Klux Klan, White Aryan Resistance (WAR) The National Socialists Party, The Outlaw Hammerskins, Blood & Honor, Aryan Nations and others would gather to meet, set goals and coordinate future events. I spent about 45 minutes on the phone with the organizer and explained my intentions as a documentary photographer. He was very skeptical, as you would imagine. In the end I was the only journalist allowed on the farm, where I pitched my tent and would ultimately photograph for three days. While I’m very interested in this moment, this photograph, for my own reasons, I’ve always liked that it allows the viewer to bring their own experience to bear in its analysis.”

Matt Mills McKnight April 18, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Morning Campfire with Light Foot Militia, Priest River, Idaho, 2011

Matt Mills McKnight (b.1980, USA) graduated from the Journalism Department at San Francisco State University with a degree in Photojournalism, and currently lives in Seattle, where he is a photo editor and freelance documentary photographer. His work has appeared with The Wall Street Journal, NBC News, The New York Times, Stern, High Country News, Southern Poverty Law Center, Wired.com, Associated Press, Reuters, NPR and many others. Before moving to Seattle, Matt was living in a small northern Idaho town working on personal projects related to fringe right-wing culture in the region. He continues to travel throughout the American West and beyond for assignments and personal work. He is represented by Redux Pictures.

About the Photograph:

“After spending about six months of attending meetings and training events with members of the 21st battalion of the Light Foot Militia, I was invited to photograph a weekend-long training session on public land near Priest River, Idaho. When I arrived to photograph them I found they had also included children in the event, an effort to share their staunch constitutionalist values and beliefs with a younger generation. ‘We’re trying to build a sense of community, not just the guys but the families also,’ said Jeff Stankiewicz, Commanding Officer of the Light Foot Militia, of opening  training sessions to families. ‘Other groups won’t do that, but we’re trying to prepare our families. Schools don’t teach our kids this stuff so we have to teach them.’ Brandy Vanderzander from Couer d’Alene, Idaho, sits around the campfire with Josiah Hoyt after a night of camping in the forest. Vanderzander’s boyfriend and Josiah’s father, Cody Hoyt, is an active member of the militia. Josiah struggled with sickness from allergies and a general fear of guns & loud noises throughout the weekend, but his family and the militia insisted he learn their ways by being present.”

Dave Anderson March 21, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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BBQ Queen”, from the project Rough Beauty, Vidor, Texas, 2004

Dave Anderson (b. 1970, United States) has been recognized as “one of the shooting stars of the American photo scene” by Germany’s fotoMAGAZIN and named a “Rising Star” by PDN. His project Rough Beauty was the winner of the 2005 National Project Competition from the Santa Fe Center for Photography and became the focus of his first book, which was published in three languages. His latest monograph, One Block: A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds, was published in 2010 by Aperture Books and featured in the New York Times and Time as well as on Good Morning America and CNN. Dave is a former MTV producer and currently producing a video series called So Lost created for the Oxford American Magazine as well as a project for NPR called Southword.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken as part of a project I did called Rough Beauty. All the photographs were taken in and around the town of Vidor, Texas. One of the biggest events of the year is homecoming parade. The parade is bigger then their 4th of July celebration. There’s also an associated beauty pageant to name a “Miss Barbecue.” The key thing to remember is that there’s not just one Miss Barbecue for girls of most ages. By my memory, there’s Miss BBQ, Junior Miss BBQ, Little Miss BBQ, Mini Miss BBQ and Tiny Miss BBQ. Even Tiny Miss got her own car in the parade —even if she was just six months of age.”

“I found this girl standing around waiting for her car to be parade-ready. She was very pretty in her white dress but she was trying to hide her embarrassing black sneakers. She said, rather plaintively, “Please don’t show my shoes…” While I wasn’t able to honor that request, I did try to burn down (darken in the dark room) her shoes a bit. So the moment with her as well as the general awkwardness of the situation was quite resonant. But the other thing that I think really makes the photo is the absolute boredom of her brother, who stands sullenly off to the the side — just waiting for it all to be over.”

Shannon Taggart March 7, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Haiti, United States.
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Haitian Vodou Ceremony, Brooklyn, New York 2009

Shannon Taggart (b.1975, USA) is a photographer based in Brooklyn. Her images have appeared in publications including Blind Spot, Time, Tokion, New York Times Magazine and Newsweek. Shannon’s work has been recognized by the Inge Morath Foundation, American Photography, the International Photography Awards, Photo District News and the Alexia Foundation for World Peace, among others. Her photographs have been shown at Photoworks in Brighton, England, The Photographic Resource Center in Boston, Redux Pictures in New York, the Stephen Cohen Gallery in Los Angeles and the New Gallery in Houston.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of a long term project about Haitian Vodou ceremonies that happen in a basement Hounfor (temple) in Brooklyn, NY. The host is Rose Marie Pierre, a third generation Mambo originally from Haiti. It was the first night that I witnessed a possession, the centerpiece of Vodou ritual. Possession may look frightening but it is actually a meaningful, sought after experience. The purpose of possession is to allow a personal interaction with the Loa, a pantheon of gods that are archetypal representatives of natural/moral principles. Possession is not an opportunity for self-expression, it is a blessing and a reward for service. It is also a gift one gives of themselves to their community so that others may consult the Loa for intercession, guidance and healing. The analogy used for possession is as if one’s body is being mounted like a horse, with the Loa as the rider. One cannot be man and god at once, so the individual needs to surrender their ego to the experience. A temporary amnesia then takes place and the events that occur remain a mystery to the person possessed.”

Ian Bates February 28, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
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Club-goers leaving after a fight broke out and guns were fired, Greenwood, Mississippi 2012

Ian Bates (b. 1992, United States) grew up in North Brunswick, New Jersey. In elementary school he received a cheap point and shoot film camera to bring on a field trip to the zoo, but didn’t realize his love for the photograph until later began taking photography classes in his sophomore year in high school. The images became a way to store memories with truth and without them fading away. He is now a junior at Ohio University working on his bachelor of science in visual communication with an emphasis in photojournalism and a Specialization in Sociology. He recently was awarded a Silver in both the General News and Feature categories in the 67th College Photographer of the Year awards. He has worked for The New York Times, Reuters, The Athens NEWS and The Asbury Park Press. Ian resides in Athens, Ohio

About the Photograph:

“I was lucky enough to have an opportunity to spend my summer working with freelance photographer Matt Eich over the summer of 2012. One of the first times I got to make pictures was the night this picture was made. Matt got invited to go to the club for one of the Baptist Town resident’s birthday party so I tagged along. The club was a metal, warehouse type building with mixed color lights out front. The inside was dark with back lights and a mirror across one wall of the dance floor. People were drinking, dancing and having fun as you would assume they would at a birthday party.”

“Then, all of a sudden, there was a weird tension throughout the whole room. Something was up and in less then a minute a fight broke out. Most didn’t want to get involved and backed away to where the tables and chairs were and some went outside. The security guards broke the fight up and kicked the participants out. Minutes later there were gunshots outside in the parking lot. People ran inside the club screaming, knocking over tables and chairs and then the lights were turned on. During the next five to ten minutes everyone stood around waiting to see what would happen next. Two weeks earlier the club had been shot up by the same crew that started the fight with the Baptist Town boys. We were soon ushered out by security guards into the parking lot where there were police officers waiting outside. The image above was from when people were being ushered out of the club. Just as the night began, in an instant, it was over.”

Elijah Hurwitz January 30, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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The Amish shooting hoops in Goshen, Indiana 2012

Elijah Hurwitz (b. 1979, United States) is a New York City based documentary photographer, but has only been calling himself that since 2012. Previously he worked in tech marketing for ten years but left to pursue photography more seriously. He has traveled in over 40 countries and is currently couch surfing his way across the United States working on different stories. He keeps a running photo journals on both Tumblr and Instagram and is represented by Zuma Press.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was made on the last day of shooting for my project about basketball’s imprint across Indiana which Mother Jones published. I sought a broad range of locations to illustrate the game’s far-reaching influence; especially places where I felt the sport offered an escape from the confines of everyday life. I’d visited the state prison, inner cities, trailer parks, expensive high school gyms, college season openers, and abandoned farms, but realized I’d overlooked the Amish communities. I didn’t know if basketball was allowed in most Amish households, but decided to spend a day exploring around Goshen where I found this hoop behind a horseshoe blacksmith. The woman of the house kindly invited me to take pictures, and when a few of her nine children overheard our conversation they ran outside to shoot around. I found the framing I wanted with the laundry hanging, then watched Justin, Suzanne and James play a game of horse while speaking a mix of English and Pennsylvania Dutch.”

Darron R. Silva January 21, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Double B Rodeo in Granite Falls, North Carolina 2010

Darron R. Silva (b. 1974, USA) studied photojournalism and Latin American studies at Western Kentucky University. He has worked as a staff photographer most recently at The Naples Daily News, but also at The News-Press in Fort Myers, FL, and the Tribune-Star in Terre Haute, Indiana. While in college he interned at The Palm Beach Post, The Ann Arbor News, The Grand Forks Herald, and his hometown paper, The Tallahassee Democrat. He currently works as a freelance photographer, teaches photography at Western Piedmont Community College in Morganton, North Carolina and is a member of Aurora Select.

About the Photograph:

“This is a photograph of Doug Brinkley as he carries the flag down to the arena to give to a cowgirl, who parades it about on horseback while the national anthem is played. I shot this at the rodeo he puts on at his farm in Granite Falls, North Carolina. Doug’s son started rodeo when he was in high school, so Doug built a small rodeo arena on his farm for his son to practice. That was many years ago, and these days his son has taken over most of the work of the rodeo, but Doug still helps out. It’s from a personal project about local cowboys and cowgirls. I was surprised to discover that the rodeo is quite popular in the foothills of North Carolina when I moved here five years ago. I have always been fascinated with cowboys, so I go to the rodeo a few times each summer and shoot photos for myself. The rodeos here are very small, and usually family run. It’s just local folks that enjoy riding and getting together on a summer evening. The whole thing is very old-school Americana.”

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