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Brent Clark April 26, 2012

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Civil War Reenactment, North Carolina 2010

Brent Clark (b.1981, United States) is a photographer born and based in North Carolina. Since earning a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2004, he has worked on long term documentary projects depicting various aspects of American culture while also freelancing for magazines and agencies. His work has been recognized by the National Press Photographer’s Association, The International Photography Awards, the Venice International Photography Contest, Jen Bekman Gallery, Travel Photographer of the Year, Burn Magazine, and the New York Times Lens Blog. His clients include TIME, Newsweek, Popular Mechanics, Popular Photography, AARP Bulletin, and Go Magazine.

About the Photograph:

“While visiting my mother in Carolina Beach, North Carolina I heard about a small Civil War reenactment at Fort Fisher just a few miles down the road.  For those who don’t know, Fort Fisher kept North Carolina’s port of Wilmington protected and open to blockade-runners supplying necessary goods to Confederate armies inland.  My niece, nephew and I arrived at the reenactment in time to see the firing of several canons.  It was probably the loudest thing I’ve ever heard, and definitely startled me even though I had been warned.  I have since learned that hearing loss and tinnitus (ringing in the ears) are extremely common among veterans of the Civil War and pretty much every other war including the current ones. I made several photos including this one, which I took after the canons had fired. I ended up liking it best because the canon smoke has spread out and filled the frame creating a surreal atmosphere. Next time I’ll be wearing ear plugs, but hopefully any minor hearing loss I suffered was worth it.”

Mike Kane April 12, 2012

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From the series “Gangland USA”. Grant County, Washington 2009

Mike Kane (b. 1976, USA) is a documentary and editorial photographer based in Seattle. In 2004 Mike received a Journalism MA under Donna DeCesare at the University of Texas, and in 2005 was awarded a two year Hearst Journalism Fellowship which lead to an accomplished career in newspapers. In 2009 he became a freelancer and has since been honored to work with investigative journalism nonprofits, foundations, and publications such as The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and Mother Jones Magazine. Mike’s ongoing documentary work with gangs has been recognized by the Nieman Foundation at Harvard, the Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, Blue Earth Alliance, the Center for Documentary Studies, and nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

About the Photograph:

This is an early image from “Gangland, USA”, an ongoing project about the proliferation of Latino gangs in rural parts of the United States. For almost two years Creeper was my entrée into the world of gangs in Grant County, Washington. A 20-year old, mid-level gangster with contacts on all tiers of a local Sureño clique, Creeper guided me through his world, a contradictory collision of youth and adulthood, gang life and family ties, rural and urban aesthetics. My purpose has been to document the inner workings of rural gangs and their effects on families and communities, and as such contribute what I can to the public understanding of an under-reported and oft-denied reality: gangs are infiltrating and disrupting rural life in a serious way and are no longer just the problem of large, dense urban areas.

Amani Willett March 26, 2012

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Chinese New Year Parade, New York 2006

Amani Willett (b. 1975, Tanzania) was recently featured in the books “Street Photography Now” and “New York in Color” and is a long-term member of the iN-PUBLiC collective of street photographers. His photographs have been widely published in print including in National Geographic Traveler, Newsweek, and The New York Times. Amani’s photographs have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, among other spaces. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn.

About the Photograph:

“For a time, I was frequenting public events with the specific purpose of photographing anything but the event itself. I found these occasions to have all the ingredients for great image making: crowds, energy and a constant dose of the unexpected.  On this particular occasion, I was photographing the Chinese New Year parade in Manhattan’s Chinatown.  I hadn’t made any images that excited me and I was just about to leave when I got thrust into the middle of a very packed crowd on the street. I looked over and saw the boy framed perfectly through the balloon and knew immediately it was the image I had been looking for all day.”

Ross McDonnell February 9, 2012

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The Vagabond Inn, Bakersfield California

Ross McDonnell (b.1979, Ireland)) is an Irish image-maker working as a director, cinematographer and photographer. His work has been published by Time, The New York Times, Art in America, The Observer, The Washington Post and Esquire among others. He has received grants and awards from The Jerome Foundation, The Irish Film Board and The Simon Cumbers Foundation. Twice nominated for an Irish Film and Television Award, his film work has been shown around the world, most recently his documentary ‘Colony’ receiving it’s world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival and winning the First Appearance Award for best first feature film at the International Documentary Film Festival in Amsterdam.

About the Photograph:

“The Vagabond Inn was cheaper than the Days down the street. They had a loyalty scheme too. Tenth night came free. For fifty bucks, it was a pretty good deal. The A/C didn’t work great in the summer when the temperature hit a hundred but beggars can’t be choosers I reckoned. There was a Starbucks Drive-Thru in the same parking lot, next to the Subway. It was better for breakfast than the Fruit Loops and carburetor coffee they had in the lobby. The Wi-Fi worked fast closer to the reception on the ground floor. It was right next to 99: Gateway to the Central Valley. I was living the dream. Photographers love Americana and I’m no different. Bakersfield was my Robert Frank’s road trip. My Eggleston’s South. The Vagabond was my Ground Zero.”

Romain Blanquart February 3, 2012

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John’s Carpet House, Detroit

Romain Blanquart (b. 1973, France) studied advertising photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology and for the last ten years he has been a staff photographer at the Detroit Free Press newspaper. He was named Michigan Photographer of the Year twice and received numerous accolades for his photography and video work from Best of Photojournalism, the Emmy Awards, PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris, International Photography Awards and The Society for News Design.  Romain is represented by Giovanna Simonetta Gallery in Milan. His work has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Time, Newsweek, Fader and Vanity Fair among others. He lives in Detroit and for the past year has been working on the video Living With Murder about the effects of homicides on is home town.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of a collaborative project with photographer Brian Widdis called Can’t Forget The Motor City. Every Sunday from May to October around 3 pm ’till dusk, as many as five hundred people gather in an empty field behind the Detroit incinerator to listen and dance to a live jam of some of Detroit’s best blues artists, their instruments powered by a generator. The place is called John’s Carpet House after John Estes who was a junk man and drummer and sometimes singer. Twenty years ago, he built a wooden shack, decorated it with scraps of carpet, and invited blues musicians to play every Sunday. John died about seven years ago and soon after his house burned down. The party has now moved across the street from John’s old shack.”

Gregg Segal November 24, 2011

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Bill and Carol Bates, Atlanta 2010

Gregg Segal (b.1964, United States) studied photography and film at the California Institute of the Arts. After detouring through film and an MFA from New York University in dramatic writing, Gregg returned to photography in 1994 with a writer’s sense of theme and irony. His photography has been recognized with awards from American Photography, Communication Arts, PDN and the Society of Publication Designers. Gregg’s portraiture is regularly featured in a wide array of publications including Time, Fortune, Esquire, ESPN, Dwell, German GQ, and Wired UK.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph of Bill and Carol Bates is from a series of portraits of people with Alzheimer’s. Each photograph combines a present-day portrait of a patient living with the illness and a projected image from his or her past. For people with Alzheimer’s, distant memories shift from background to foreground. To illustrate the past’s prominence, I’ve included it in each picture. The most wrenching part of witnessing the dissolution of a loved one is that you have them whole in the same moment that they’re gone. That simultaneity of having and losing, that nostalgia, is at the heart of Remembered. We have a tendency to look at an older person and forget who they once were. Often, we have a hard time picturing old people as ever being young. I want you to look at these pictures and be reminded that the people here loved, married, were vibrant, passionate; they lived life fully.” (more…)

Bryan Derballa October 31, 2011

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Artist Chili Moon Town, New York 2009

Bryan Derballa (b. 1982, USA) is a Brooklyn-based documentary photographer. He studied English at the University of California in Berkeley before taking up photography. In 2006 he started Lovebryan, a photo blog site featuring a community of friends. Together many of the Lovebryan contributors have pushed each other to become working photojournalists, filmmakers or acclaimed fine art photographers.  Bryan has used the site as an outlet for personal projects and assignments in Israel, Colombia, Venezuela, Russia, New Zealand and most recently Brazil. Bryan has photographed for clients including The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, The FADER, AARP, The Daily, Wired.com, Juxtapoz, Nike, Adidas, and Huck Magazine.

About the Photograph:

“A ragtag conglomeration of marching bands filled the lobby of a building in midtown Manhattan just before the beginning of a performance piece called “City of Dreams” by the artists Chili Moon Town. The were about to pile into a decorated double-decker bus banging  and blowing their instruments on a drive down Broadway. It was a grand spectacle for all of New York City to see. But for me, this photo of Kate Riegle van West was far more interesting. It was the quiet moment before the cacophony that no one really noticed. She seemed so sincere- playing to herself while all the others were pacing around and joking with one another. A lot of things happened in front of my camera that day, but nothing felt so subtly emotive. When it comes down to it, that’s always my favorite feeling to photograph.”

Brandon Thibodeaux October 10, 2011

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Shishmaref, Alaska 2006

Brandon Thibodeaux (b. 1981, United States) is a member of the New York based photography collective, MJR. Following his university studies in photojournalism and international development he now resides in Dallas, Texas, where he regularly contributes to the Financial Times Weekend Magazine, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal, among others. He is a member of the Getty Reportage 2009-10 Emerging Talent, and the Eddie Adams XIX alumnus.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from my first real project endeavor during my senior year of college.  In August 2006 I traveled 120 miles northwest of Nome, Alaska, landing in the small island village of Shishmaref.  Its roughly 550 Inupiaq residents faced a looming migration due to the severe erosion plaguing the tiny island.  Climate change was keeping protective sea ice from forming around its shoreline leaving its brittle sand and permafrost foundation vulnerable against harsh winter storms. I was taken aback by the elements of pop culture that I found, like 2 Pac posters, and video game consoles, intertwined with the community’s more traditional ways of life.  Shortly after this image was taken we feasted on caribou steaks and Akutaq – otherwise known as Eskimo ice cream made from whipped caribou fat and seal oil, mixed with fresh picked salmon berries.”

Brian Widdis October 3, 2011

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Grand Rapids, Michigan 2006

Brian Widdis (b. 1969, USA) began his professional work in 1995 doing commercial photography in Lansing and Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2001, he relocated to Detroit and began doing editorial work. In 2009, Brian photographed the ritual of collecting the daily mail as part of the series ‘Delivery’. Since 2007, he has been photographing his home life and his experience being a dad for a project titled ‘The Home Front’. Brian is also working with fellow Detroit photographer Romain Blanquart about the city of Detroit called ‘Can’t Forget the Motor City’. His work has been published in Rolling Stone, Time, The Guardian, The New York Times, Education Week and NPR. Brian lives with his family in Detroit.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of my project – ‘The Passion of St. James’. In 2006, my elementary school in Grand Rapids, Michigan closed. Before they closed, I made a final visit to see how my memory compared to its last days as a Catholic grade school. Squinting through the viewfinder, I was reassured by things familiar to me – unchanged classrooms and the sunken gymnasium with the same 1970‘s blue and gold carpet that I remembered. Also reassuring was the unfamiliar – a new media center with computers and new textbooks told of a school changing, as of course they must. St. James was the site of many milestones for me – my first crush and my first Communion. My personal history at the school was confirmed by a library book – a biography of baseball player Roberto Clemente that I remember checking out, still bore the deliberate cursive ‘Brian W.’ some 30 years later.”

Brad Vest September 19, 2011

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From the series “The Best We Can”, Amesville, Ohio 2010

Brad Vest (b. 1985, USA) became interested in photography while souping film in the basement of his dormitory attending the University of Illinois. At the time he was completing a Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences degree. After graduating in 2008 he moved on to work at newspapers in Seattle, Kansas, and Milwaukee focusing on daily storytelling and exploring longer term, narrative stories. In 2009 following his passion to continue long-term documentary storytelling he moved to Ohio University. In 2010, he attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and was a winner in the Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward 2011. He was also featured during the LOOK3 SHOTS presentation of 2011. His work has also been recognized by the College Photographer of the Year competition and the NPPA Best of Photography competition.

 About the Photograph:

“After raising two children, Kim Wilson represents the changing role of grandparents in southeast Ohio. After Kim’s daughter’s drug related custody forfeiture of her two children, Jenna and Ayden, Kim and her husband, Darren, took the kids into their home and have found themselves as parents the second time around. This photo was taken during one of the many days that I spent with the Wilson family while documenting families affected by the ongoing prescription drug epidemic within Appalachia. Kim is helping Ayden and Jenna brush their teeth before sending Jenna off to school. The family doesn’t have running water to their bathroom sink so they use their kitchen for most of their running water needs. Kim and Darren’s decision to raise their grandkids has them confronting the challenges of raising young children while negotiating the issues around aging and their independence.”

Pete Marovich September 12, 2011

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Mennonite family in Virginia, 2008

Pete Marovich (b. 1961, USA) has been a photojournalist for 24 years working for newspapers, wire services and magazines. From 1986 until 1999, Pete worked as a contract photographer for major golf publications while covering the professional golf tours. He was named the 2008 NPPA Region 3 Photographer of the year as well as runner-up in 2006 and 2009. Images from his coverage of the 2009 Presidential Inauguration were included in the Official Inaugural Book as well as the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum of American History. He is currently the Washington D.C. Bureau Chief for ZUMA Press covering the White House and Capitol Hill. His photography has appeared in Time Magazine, Newsweek, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, Mother Jones, Sports Illustrated, The Huffington Post, Politico, Bloomberg and others.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is from a project on an Old Order Mennonite family in Virginia. I had been working for the newspaper in Harrisonburg and there is a large Mennonite community in the surrounding county. The project was not easy to photograph since Old Order Mennonites are similar to the Amish in that they do not like to be photographed. I was introduced to this family by a family friend who had grown up knowing the family. Permission to visit them and “observe” their way of life was granted by the patriarch of the family with the understanding that they would not pose for any images. I spent about eight months making visits to the family while getting to know them, gaining their trust and making the occasional image. This particular photograph was made during a community gathering at a nearby farm. Jesse, the youngest of the children, was hanging out with the men.”

Julie Glassberg August 17, 2011

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Marissa and Mikey @ the Chicken Hut, Brooklyn 2009

Julie Glassberg (b. 1984, France) studied graphic design for four years and later decided to make her passion for photography become her life. Her interests are primarily based on the diversity of world cultures, subcultures, underground scenes as well as misfits of society, the weak, the feared, the unaccepted. Photography is like a passport to enter worlds that she would never be able to see otherwise. Julie is currently working in New York City on projects as well as freelancing for clients such as The New York Times. She is the recipient for the LUCIE Scholarship Emerging Grant (2010), a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography (2010), a 2011 POYi award of excellence, and was selected by PhotoEspana Descubrimiento 2011.

About the Photograph:

“This photo comes from a long term project called Bike Kill, about the tall bike subculture in Brooklyn. A lot of the images are chaotic. It’s a bit of a destructive, crazy environment. Good crazy though. This community is full of artists, self taught kids, and DIY experiments. I like the quiet moment captured while everyone was going crazy, alcohol flowing and music playing loud. At some point Mikey pulled me out of the crowd. He took me to a huge elevator and locked the door. There were five of us and Chacha the dog. Coming from the chaotic party, this became a very quiet, intimate moment. I shot a few pictures in the elevator and then this perfect instant just happened: the position of the arm, the looks, the leg up.  This photo says a lot about those kids. Marissa and Mikey are friends and we can tell by this picture that they are really close. That’s how this community works. It might be a chaotic environment, but it is more about a big family, caring for each other, sharing and creating.”

Mae Ryan August 8, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Convent of Mary the Queen in Yonkers, NY 2010

Mae Ryan (b. 1987, United States) is a documentary photographer and multimedia producer based in Brooklyn, NY. She is a graduate of the Documentary Photography and Photojournalism Program at The International Center of Photography and holds a BS in Architectural Design from Stanford University. Her work has appeared in TIME Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The FADER and Architectural Record and she has produced multimedia pieces for Magnum In Motion. In 2010, Mae attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and in 2011 she won a scholarship to attend the Foundry Workshop in Buenos Aires.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photo of Sister Marilda on the first day that I stepped into the Convent of Mary the Queen in Yonkers, NY. The Sisters had invited me to document a funeral at their in-house chapel and as I was leaving I noticed that Sister Marilda was lingering in the foyer to watch her friends leave.  I later learned that over thirty years ago Sister Marilda fell ill and promised God that if her health improved she would wear the full habit until the day she died. Pictured behind her is Elizabeth Ann Seton, who founded the Sisters of Charity in 1809. This order of nuns was once a thriving community that served as teachers and nurses throughout the New York area. Today there are about 300 living members of the community, however no one has joined the order in the past five years. 80 of these nuns now live in the Convent of Mary the Queen, which the community established to take care of the aging Sisters as they approached the end of their lives.” (more…)

McNair Evans August 1, 2011

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Easter Morning, North Carolina 2010

McNair Evans (b. 1979, USA) found photography as a powerful ethnographic tool for exploring the human condition. His work draws parallels between the lives of individuals and universal shared experiences, correlations that create first-person narrative journeys. Recognizing subjectivity as an unalienable characteristic of our medium, McNair utilizes mental and emotional states as mood and context. He has received multiple graduate level scholarships and has been published in USA Today, the Academy of Art and National Geographic Adventurer. In 2011 McNair won the Curator’s Choice from CENTER.

About the Photograph:

“My elder sister Patricia and her husband are shown saying grace with our Mom’s hand reaching into the frame. An original member of this prayer circle, I saw the lighting, Mom’s hand gesturing to Patricia, and made this single image. Removing myself from the circle to photograph this intimate moment echoes the difficult balance of photographing loved ones. This photograph belongs to a larger series titled A Journal of Southern History that describes my return home in 2010 to photograph the lasting emotional landscape of my father’s death and insolvency. My goal was to retrace my father’s life, using photography as a vehicle of resolution. Within my immediate family, I witnessed intense affliction and perseverance. This theme resonates in my sister on Easter morning, which also conveys the continuum of religion in their lives.”

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