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Sam Harris September 22, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Uma and Cheepy. Balingup, Western Australia 2013

Sam Harris (b. 1967, England) taught himself photography as a teenager, turning his London bedroom into a makeshift darkroom. Throughout the nineties Sam photographed portraits and sleeve art for numerous recording artists. He also worked as an editorial portrait & features photographer for  The Sunday Times Magazine, Esquire, Telegraph Magazine and Dazed & Confused. The over commercialization of the music industry during the late 1990’s was the catalyst for a big change in direction, both photographic and personal. Sam abandoned his London career in favour of quality family time, slowing down and turning his camera inwards. After several nomadic years with his family between India and Australia, Sam settled in the forests of Western Australia where he now photographs his on-going family diary and runs photography workshops. Sam’s  self-published photo book Postcards from Home received several awards including the Australian publishing industry’s Galley Club ‘Australian Book of the Year’ 2012.

About the Photograph:

“I’ve been photographing my daughters for some time now, but with more dedication since 2008 when I started the series Postcards from Home. I photograph spontaneously, as and when the moment, or the light hits me. When I took this photo all the attention was on Cheepy, Uma’s budgie. So when Uma raised her necklace to play with Cheepy I seized the opportunity to grab a couple of frames. Otherwise I doubt she would have allowed me to get quite so close with my camera. And so it goes photographing my daughters growing up. My book The Middle of Somewhere will be published by Ceiba Foto, spring 2015.”

Louise Whelan April 7, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Turkish migrant, Lightning Ridge, Australia 2011

Louise Whelan (b.1967, Australia) completed an advanced certificate in photography at Ultimo College in Sydney. She works across various fields from documentary and fine art photography through to corporate editorial work and still on films. Her current project includes documenting the diverse ethnic communities that make up Australia for the State and National Libraries. This work has been awarded the National Photographic Portrait Prize 2013 presented by former Prime Minister Julia Gillard. Louise’s first monograph New Settlers was published this year by T & G Publishing. She was also one of the Australian Photographers selected for the Fuji 10×100 book project.

About the Photograph:

“This portrait was taken as part of my ongoing social documentary project of the different ethnicities that make up Australia for the State and National Libraries. It was made in Lightning Ridge, which is situated in the north central part of New South Wales not far from the Queensland border. Opal mining has been the major attraction for migrants since the early 1900s. Typically it attracts those interested in working for themselves. Many migrants set up life in this small mining town by laying out a claim and mining under ground for opal. This Turkish migrant who has been living in Lighting Ridge for over 25 years. As well as mining he also runs a repair business. Lightning Ridge has just lost its much needed funding for the multicultural sector, which provided health services for the aging migrant community. Temperatures in summer can reach the high forties and it has been known for some of these migrants to perish in their tin shed homes in the mining camps.”

David Maurice Smith October 3, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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From the series ‘Living in the Shadows’. Wilcannia, New South Wales, Australia, 2012.

David Maurice Smith (b. 1973, Canada) is a Canadian documentary photographer based in Sydney, Australia whose photography is informed by a previous 10 year career in social work supporting individuals in disadvantaged communities. In 2013 David was named Australian Emerging Documentary photographer of the year as well as being named winner of the $10,000 POOL Grant for his ongoing project in Wilcannia, a rural Aboriginal community. He joined Australia’s Oculi photographic collective in 2012 and in 2011 he was awarded the LIFE Magazine Grant at the Eddie Adams Workshop in New York. His work has been published by The New York Times, CNN, Monocle Magazine, Huffington Post, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Telegraph, The Australian, SBS, VICE, Hemispheres Magazine and The Surfer’s Journal.

About the Photograph:

“I have been photographing the Barkindji Aboriginal community of Wilcannia, New South Wales, Australia since 2010. Like so many indigenous people around the world, the Barkindji are caught in a cycle of disparity caused by a dark history of colonization, institutionalized racism and harsh socioeconomic realities. Despite being the traditional keepers of one of the most prosperous nations on earth, they endure conditions comparable to a third world nation. The average male life expectancy in their community is approximately 35 years of age, less than half the national average.”

“The scene depicted in this image is familiar in many communities: carefree children, lost in play. However the reality is that for these Barkindji girls life is far from carefree and their future, like the abandoned lot in which they play, looks very different to that of their non-Aboriginal counterparts. (from L to R) Ariah Jones aged 4, Rhianna Harris aged 5, Shania Mills aged 7 and Whitney Harris aged 7 have the odds stacked against them. Sisters Rhianna and Whitney are being raised by a relative as their mother (who stood just out of frame) is unable to care for them due to her alcoholism and frequent incarceration. Several days into a drinking binge she was clumsily trying to engage with her daughters to no avail. It was difficult to watch as they made fun of her as children do when struggling to understand or accept someone. Despite being their mother, she was a stranger to them. They ignored her attempts at connection as if to shield themselves from the hurt of abandonment”

Andrew Quilty February 6, 2013

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Maxwelton Races. Central Queensland, Australia 2007

Andrew Quilty (b. 1981, Sydney, Australia) completed studies in photography at TAFE in Sydney in 2004. He worked as a staff photographer for The Australian Financial Review from 2004 – 2006 until he was given the position of staff photographer for The AFR Magazine where he remained until 2010 when he left Fairfax to pursue a freelance career. It was his personal work that resulted in his invitation to join Australia’s photographic collective, Oculi in 2007 and accolades including a World Press Photo Award and the inaugural Walkely Young Australian Photojournalist of the Year Award. His work has been published in The New York Times, TIME Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The International Herald Tribune, Le Monde and The Guardian Weekend Magazine. He currently lives in New York.

About the Photograph:

“Everyone remembers where they were at the moment they heard of the attacks on the Twin Towers on September 11 2001. For me, it was in a town of one street, one pub, a roadhouse and 11 residents called McKinlay in central Queensland, Australia. McKinlay was most well known for hosting a couple of the pubs scenes in The Crocodile Dundee movies and provided my two friends and I the reason for stopping in on our way around Australia that year. Since then I’d always wanted to return to that strange little place. In the winter of 2007 I drove the 2000+ km to McKinlay and went about photographing the people and the atmosphere of the tired little town whose numbers were dwindling as the elderly passed and the young moved away to greater prosperity.”

“On a Saturday I followed the Fegan family to the nearby (160km) and even smaller town of Maxwelton (pop. 2) for the annual Maxwelton Races. This photograph was taken as the horses ran the final straight on the last race of the day. The children had tired themselves out during the day and sat peacefully on hay bales as the small crowd of adults cheered on from the finish line and then thought about the long road home to wherever it was from where they’d come. This photograph was awarded 1st prize in the Sports Feature Single category in the 2008 World Press photo Awards.”

Conor Ashleigh January 11, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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New South Wales, Australia 2011

Conor Ashleigh’s (b. 1987 Australia) passion for social justice was ignited at the age of 16 when he spent time volunteering in a school for students who were crippled from land mines, one of the brutal legacies of the Khmer Rouge regime. Struck deeply by his experience he began to travel and volunteer in communities throughout Asia. After Conor returned to Australia he completed a Bachelor of Development Studies at Newcastle University while also working with homeless youth. His work has been published in the: Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, New Internationalist, Big Issue, Wall Street Journal online and Grazia among others. He has also worked on international assignments for the Asia Foundation, AusAID, UNICEF, Catholic Mission, Red Cross  and Oxfam.

About the Photograph:

“Baby in a chapel is a visual exploration of a family navigating life in rural Australia. Parents Rose and Kai consciously chose to leave the city and relocate their family to the country to live closer to the earth and also to have less distractions or the demands associated with making ends meet in a city. Their two daughters Mali and Persia (Lily) have now grown up in their community since late 2008. Life in the bush is focused more on adapting to the natural environment. Too much rain can lead to the seven bridges into town flooding while not enough solar power to run basic appliances makes basic domestic processes difficult. Living close to the land means the family grows much of their food and has an abundance of clean drinking water. They also have an abundance of time to spend with their daughters free from disruptions. The time Rose and Kai have spent with their girls can be seen in their close relationship as well as their personal confidence and curiosity with the world. Visiting the family for a few days every couple of months I’m able to recognize how the girls change. Baby in a chapel is an ongoing project.”

Daniel Hartley-Allen November 14, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Darwin, Australia 2011

Daniel Hartley-Allen (b.1986, Australia) began his career in 2009 working as a photographic assistant in the United Arab Emirates for Etihad and General Motors. He completed a newspaper internship in 2010 and has since shot assignments for Getty Images, Australian Associated Press, The Times (London) and News Ltd Publications. This year he was a finalist for the Walkley Young Australian Journalist of the Year Award. His work has been published in: The Guardian, USA Today, Chicago Tribune and India Times among others. Daniel is based in Darwin, Australia.

About the Photograph:

“Fred Walker , a former champion boxer and WWII veteran now sits on his own, staring blankly at the bed where his wife Phyllis slept before she was taken into compulsory government care. Roaming through his hushed home in Darwin, Australia. Mr Walker said: “She had committed no crime but she has been locked away and forbidden to go home.”  It’s a story of love and loss often seen in an ageing population – elderly people separated from the ones they love because aged care services are concerned for their welfare. Phyllis was taken to Hospital after she suffered a fall in October, 2011. She remained on a secure ward for several weeks before an Aged Care Assessment Team determined Mr Walker was unfit in his capacity to care for her and was transferred to a nursing home. The health department said nobody was kept in a hospital if they didn’t need to be and, in Ms Walker’s case, “the notion of keeping her there against her will was not a factor.”

Andrew Kelly September 24, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Rory celebrates rain falling onto his drought stricken farm in Werribee, Australia 2009

Andrew Kelly (b. 1978, Australia) studied marketing, then went on to work in finance. While traveling years later, he developed a love of photography and decided to ditch the calculator for the camera. He enrolled in RMIT’s Applied Photography program in 2006. Upon completion he was employed by Fairfax Media, a major Australian news organization where he covered news and sports. Then, on a whim in 2010, Andrew relocated to New York City. Since arriving his major client has been Reuters. Andrew’s work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, TIME, The Chicago Tribune, The LA Times, O Globo, The Guardian and the Sydney Morning Herald.

About the Photograph:

“After ten years of drought in Australia, the struggling farmer story was becoming far too familiar. One assignment I was sent on however really hit home. It was about an educational children’s farm run by a single mother and her son. With regular farms, the animals come and go, but at this establishment, the animals had been the stars and were much loved by the two owners. However as the drought dragged on, food for the animals became scarce and one by one they were forced to give them away, which resulted in less of an attraction and therefore drew less people until they were left with a handful of their pets, a few horses and no visitors. I shot the story and left, but couldn’t stop thinking about them and their hardship that night. The next day I was covering the same area of the state when I saw the first storm clouds in months rolling in overhead. With the story fresh in my mind I raced back to the farm as the first raindrops began to fall. I ran from my car and found the mother and her son dancing in their baron field and I made this frame.”

Brian Cassey November 10, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Boxing Match. Cairns, Queensland Australia

Brian Cassey (b.1959, England) is based in Australia and freelances for various national and international media. He is also a member of the Australian photojournalist collective ‘fotostrada’. He has covered Tsunamis in Asia (Aceh,Indonesia, Thailand and Myanmar 2004/5 and Sissano, Papua New Guinea 1998) the evacuation of refugees from East Timor (1999), George Speights coup in Fiji, the World Economic Forum riots in Melbourne (2000) and the victims of the 2002 Bali terrorist bombs. Brian won the “Australian Sports Photo of the Year” and has recieved recognition in the Walkley, Moran, Hurley and Rothmans photo awards. In 2010, Brian was selected as a finalist in “Australia’s Top Photographers” in both the Editorial and Photojournalism categories.

About the Photograph:

“A Boxing and Muay Thai Explosion – Australia vs Thailand”  … at least that’s what it said on the posters advertising a night of kick boxing (Muay Thai) and fisticuffs (traditional boxing) in the small tropical City of Cairns in Far North Queensland Australia. An enthusiastic crowd of two hundred fifty odd turned up at the local Police Youth Club hall to drink, yell and spur on kids, girls and men to kick and punch each other into submission. The young girl, her first real fight, didn’t know what hit her as her more experienced opponent kicked the living day lights out of her in the first round. The evening’s entertainment came to a crescendo well after midnight as the one real Thai boxer from took the ring against his local Australian opponent. Predictably He won … easily.”

Graham Miller April 15, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Rhonda and Chantelle, Australia, 2007,  from “Suburban Splendor”

Graham Miller (b. 1966, Hong Kong) is a photographic artist and co-founder of FotoFreo a biennial international festival of photography based in Fremantle, Western Australia. His work has been exhibited internationally and throughout Australia, including Pingyao International Festival of Photography China, Recontres Photographie Internationale de France, Kaunas Photo Lithuania, Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney, the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, and the Photography Gallery of Western Australia. He is interested in the ambiguity of images. The way that all photographs have elements of fabrication and truth making.

About the Photograph:

“This image is part of the series Suburban Splendor, which I started in 2005 in Perth, Australia where I live. The series emerged out of the frustration and helplessness I felt to a political climate that saw the escalation of the Iraqi war, the mistreatment of asylum seekers, and an apathy by our government to a growing environmental crisis. From this feeling, I began to construct suburban visual narratives which became metaphors of isolation and disconnection, and meditations on human frailty. In the introduction to his collection of short stories ‘Where I’m Calling From’ Raymond Carver quotes V.S Pritchett”s description of the short story as something glimpsed from the corner of the eye, in passing. First the glimpse, the glimpse given life and turned into something which will illuminate the moment. Many of my own photographs take shape in a similar way. I caught a glimpse of the red interior of a friend’s car in the fading light. This fragment remained with me, and later I was able to figure out how to incorporate it into an image which would resonate and achieve the emotional tone that I wanted.”

Jesse Marlow July 10, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Australia.
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Indigenous Football, Australia

Jesse Marlow is a documentary photographer based in Melbourne, Australia. Over the last eight years he has worked for a range of local and international magazines, newspapers and commercial clients. His works are held in public and private collections across Australia. In 2002, he was the inaugural winner of the Australian Hasselblad X-Pan Masters competition. In 2005 he published a book of street photographs titled “Wounded”. In 2006 he was selected to participate in the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass in Amsterdam. He is a member of both the international street photographers collective in-public.com and Oculi, Australia’s leading documentary photography agency. His work is distributed throughout Europe by Agence Vu.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photo at a community called Papunya which is in the Central Australian desert. It’s from my book Centre Bounce: Football from Australia’s Heart which documents the game of Australian Rules Football as it’s played by Indigenous Australians living in the remote Northern Territory. I worked on this project on and off for 5 years and this was one of the last photos I shot for the series. Minutes before the game started this young boy appeared, and set off walking around the perimeter of the ground with a cup of lime marking out the boundary line. I followed him around the whole ground but it was as he returned to his starting point that the scene began to work as a photo. It’s one of my favorite images from the book because I feel it perfectly depicts the grass-roots style of football being played in the spectacular landscape of the Australian desert.

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