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Dijana Muminovic October 17, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Bosnia.
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My friend Tanja on the train to Sarajevo 2008

Dijana Muminovic (b.1983, Bosnia) moved to America 1997 and earned a BA in photojournalism at Western Kentucky University. In Bowling Green, she began exploring the stories of some of the six thousand other Bosnian refugees who still wait for their loved ones to be found and identified from the many mass graves that still exist in Bosnia. That work was exhibited in the US Congress Building. In 2011, she organized and hosted the American workshop, Truth With A Camera in Bosnia. Dijana was a finalist for the Photo Philanthropy Activist Award. She was awarded two grants from the Kentucky Foundation for Women. In 2013, she was a 2nd place winner from the Alexia Foundation. She currently teaches photography at The Athens Photographic Project to those with mental illness.

About the Photograph:

“I was visiting my native Bosnia from the United States when one morning I took a train from my hometown Zenica to the capital of Sarajevo with a childhood friend. Tanja is special because during the Bosnian war in nineties, we were separated for four years. She went to live in Italy and I stayed in Bosnia longing for her return. When the war ended my family applied to go to US.  In 1997, we fled. The day after I left, Tanja returned from Italy and came looking for me.”

“She sat across from me on the train, and glanced through the window every so often. Behind her sat a woman traveling to sell things on streets to survive. Her expression and the veil in the window’s reflection drove me to capture this moment. The morning sun and the fog outside made it possible for a better reflection through the window, but as the train was moving, it was difficult to catch the good light. I hoped that the fog would remain and waited to capture the expression of both women. When I look at this photograph I think of how the faith of so many young women in this region was altered by the war. And it made me think of my own too.”

Christian Lutz October 4, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Bosnia.
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Srebrenica commemorative walk. Bosnia-Herzegovina 2009

Christian Lutz (b. 1973, Switzerland) studied photography at the Art School Le 75  in Brussels and has been working on stories in the Balkans, in South America, West Africa, in the United States and in Switzerland. His work has been exhibited in a variety of places. His last story “Protokoll” was nominated for the 2007 HSBC Foundation of Photography and won the Nicolas Bouvier Prize in Switzerland. His book “Protokoll” won the German Photography Book Prize 2007. Christian is a member of Agence VU  in Paris.

About the Photograph:

“This march follows the same trail as that of the column of 14 000 men who left Srebrenica on July 11 1995 following the attack of Serbian forces and the abandonment of the “safe zone” by UN forces. It symbolically retraces the path through the main locations of past massacres between Pobudje and Potocari. It is here that each year there is a commemoration to the genocide of Srebenica. At the Potocari memorial, the coffins containing the remains of bodies identified and registered over the year are displayed before being buried.”

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Ziyah Gafic September 8, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Bosnia.
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Ziyah Gafic was born in Sarajevo and graduated from  Sarajevo University. He regularly contributes to magazines and newspapers such as: Liberation, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Photo, Telegraph Magazine, The   L’Espresso, Newsweek and TIME among others. His work has been widely exhibited in Perpignan, Arles, Amsterdam, London, Tokyo, and Geneva  His photo essay about the aftermath of the Bosnian war was published in the book “Tales From Globalizing World”. Honors include: The Ian Parry/ Sunday Times Magazine award and also won 2nd prize of the World Press Photo contest, 2001.  Kodak award for young reporters at Visa pour l’Image, 2002. PDN’s 30 emerging photographers, 2003. Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography, 2007. Grant from OPA for his project “Muslims of New York”, 2008. His other projects focus on societies in transition; from Bosnia to Rwanda and Chechnya to Iraq.  Ziyak is represented by Getty Images.

About the Photograph:

Growing up in besieged Sarajevo and witnessing the war from the point of view of someone to whom the war was actually happening but not being able to take part in it left me deeply frustrated. Photography allowed me to be on the other side of the event. Frustration grew into determination to document the long and painful aftermath in post-war Bosnia. It was the reason for me becoming a photographer. I knew how reduced and distorted the image of my homeland had become to the rest of the world and I felt obliged to give my best and change that image. I had this extraordinary experience to be on both sides: to be part of the news and to be storyteller myself which gave me a rare inside-out look which determined and shaped my approach to storytelling.

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