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Karen Miranda Rivadeneira July 29, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ecuador.
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Matilde and I. Vinchoa, El Bolivar, Ecuador 2012

Karen Miranda Rivadeneira (b.1983, United States) graduated from the School of Visual Arts before beginning her journey in photography. She has participated in numerous residencies such as Fondazione Ratti’s in Como, Italy, The Wurlitzer foundation in New Mexico and Pour L’Image in Niort, France and Lightwork in Syracuse, NY. She has worked with the Mam in Guatemala, with the Mandaeans (from south of Iraq and west of Iran) living in Sweden and lately in the Andean Mountains. She is the recipient of multiple awards and fellowships, including a NYFA Fellowship in photography,  EnFoco New Works Award, and two awards by the Queens Council of the Arts. Karen has recently been invited to participate at the third Latin American Photography forum in Sao Paulo, Brazil . Her work is part of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts Photography Collection.

About the Photograph:

“Matilde Cunalata is a yachaj or what is commonly known as a Shaman. We met a couple of years ago, and since then, I visit her every year sometimes for months at a time. Through her knowledge of plants and singing, people come to her for physical and also emotional healing. The art of a yachaj is fast decaying in part because not a single relative wants to carry on this tradition. A tradition that has been alive for thousand of years, predating the Incas, relating closely to Mongolian shamanism in a sense. This image was taken the morning after after a ceremony that went throughout the night. We left her house and I saw this beautiful wall of plants, I was leaving the next day back to New York and wanted to have an image of us that will conclude our nightly ordeal. I set up the camera, and we manage to climb through the steep greenery, I asked a passerby to press the shutter and gave him one instruction; to press the shutter when we seemed relaxed and this was it.”

Rafael Fabrés January 26, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ecuador.
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Quilotoa Lake, Ecuador 2010

Rafael Fabrés (b.1982, Spain) graduated in Media Communications from the Universidad Europea de Madrid and later studied photography at the Escuela de Fotografía y Centro de Imagen in Madrid. He became involved with  photography in 2006, two months after documenting the north of India and working with an NGO in Kolkata. He is currently based between Haiti and Spain. His clients include Getty Images, and Deutsche Presse Agentur. His work has been published in GEO, Wild Magazine and The Record.

About the Photograph:

“Quilotoa lake is 170 Km from Quito Ecuador on the Panamerican Highway. At almost four thousand meters above sea level, a huge turquoise lagoon of about 3.15 kilometers in diameter, extends into the interior of the crater. To reach it one must descend a steep road of about 440 meters, coming from a small town at the top called Chugchilán. This people of this village live mainly from tourism and local crafts. Manuel Yampa’s family run a small inn in Chugchilán. He and his wife rent mules who bring tourists uphill from the lake. With a height of almost six thousand meters the “Neck of Fire”, as it is called in Quechua, the Cotopaxi is one of the highest active volcanoes in the world.”

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