jump to navigation

Sebastian Meyer January 23, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq, Kurdistan.
Tags: ,
comments closed


Kurdish Peshmerga soldiers carry the coffin of an unknown Kurd who had been exhumed
from a mass grave. Erbil, Iraq 2008

Sebastian Meyer (b. 1980, United States) started working as a photographer in his home town of New York in 2004. Later that year, he moved to the UK and worked in Manchester and London till 2009 when he relocated to Northern Iraq where he helped set up Metrography, the first Iraqi photo agency. Sebastian’s work has been published by Time Magazine, Sunday Times Magazine, FT Magazine, Monocle, and other international publications. He’s also made films for National Geographic, Channel 4 News, The Guardian, and PBS. His awards include 1st Place at the Exposure Awards as well as being included in the Magenta Emerging Photographer Flash Forward Exhibition.

About the Photograph:

“I first went to Iraqi Kurdistan in 2008 on assignment for a British film company that was making a series of documentaries about the 1988 Anfal campaign during which Saddam Hussein killed thousands of Iraqi Kurds. My job was to take stills that would eventually be cut into the films and later would be used in a Kurdish history and culture museum which the Kurdish government was building in the capital, Erbil. For six weeks I traveled around the region visiting different villages and meeting and photographing survivors of Anfal.”

“I took this photograph at the Erbil airport during a “repatriation” ceremony. About 50 bodies had been exhumed from a mass grave in southern Iraq and taken back up north for reburial. On that rainy day, each of the 50 bodies had been placed in separate coffins which were then individually wrapped in Kurdish flags. One by one, four Peshmerga (Kurdish soldiers) carried the coffins onto the tarmac and laid them out in rows. In the background, the president (in the grey coat and red turban) and prime minister (tall with a blue mackintosh and mustache) stood shoulder to shoulder with families of the missing. A year later I moved to Iraqi Kurdistan where I’ve been living on and off ever since. Easily the most fascinating aspect of the region is its impassioned historical drive to create its unique identity of Kurdistan. But what makes up that identity is extremely complex. Part of it is geography. Part of it is artistic culture such as music, dancing, and poetry. But part of it is also victimhood. This photograph is part of project that looks at the creation of a modern Iraqi Kurdish identity where wealth, independence, and youth clash with poverty, victimhood, and tradition.”

Jed Conklin August 1, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq.
Tags:
comments closed


Camp Mittica, Nasiriyah, Iraq 2008

Jed Conklin (b.1977, United States) began pursuing photography while studying at Western Kentucky University where he received a bachelor degree in both photojournalism and print journalism. His first photography job landed him in Pinedale, Wyoming where he was an intern at the Pinedale Roundup. He later interned at the Concord Monitor, the Jackson Hole News and Guide and would be hired full time at The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington. In 2007 Jed  started freelancing. He has since worked on projects in Mexico, Morocco, Paris, Italy, Monaco, China, Iraq, Canada and the United States.

About the Photograph:

“Mahdi Fadil kisses his son Husain Mahdi, six, after the child underwent a cleft lip surgery by an Italian team with Smile Train at Camp Mittica near Nasiriyah, Iraq. The blast-wall-surrounded camp near the city of Nasiriyah in Dhi Qar Province once served as an Italian military base. Now, it houses a mobile hospital and a series of trailers with hospital beds, laboratories, meeting rooms, and classrooms. The visit by Smile Train was the group’s second time at Camp Mittica. On its first visit six months before Iraqis were apprehensive and no girls were brought in for medical care, says Francesca Pacelli, clinical coordinator for the nonprofit group. This time, some 300 girls and boys from across southern Iraq showed up.”

Christoph Bangert September 14, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq.
Tags:
comments closed


Sandstorm, Baghdad, Iraq 2006

Christoph Bangert (b. 1978, Germany) graduated from ICP in 2003. In 2002 he shipped an old Landrover from Germany to Buenos Aires and in six months, drove from Argentina, 22,000 miles to New York City. The resulting photos of the trip were published in his first book titled Travel Notes. (powerHouse 2007) He has been covering the Iraq war since  2005 for the New York Times. His work from Iraq is collected in: “IRAQ: The Space Between”. He has exhibited in Germany, New York and at the Musee de L’Elysee in Switzerland where he was selected as one of 50 emerging photographers for an exhibit and book titled: reGeneration (Thames & Hudson 2005; Aperture 2006). Christoph was chosen as one of PDN’s 30 emerging photographers and for the 2007 Joop Swart Masterclass. He recently returned from a 14 month long overland journey with his Land Rover across Africa.

About the Photograph:

“I took this picture while I was on assignment for The New York Times in Iraq. One day a huge sandstorm swept across Baghdad and the fine dust in the air turned everything bright yellow and orange. This is one of the few pictures I was able to take in public on the streets of Baghdad between 2005 and 2006. During this time kidnappings and beheadings of foreigners forced the few western journalists that remained in Iraq to travel with armed Iraqi escorts and cautiously plan every trip ahead of time. Most neighborhoods were completely off limits for outsiders. Wandering the streets and taking pictures openly became unthinkable. Occasionally I received requests from western publications to take pictures of daily life in Baghdad. I always struggled to explain that this probably was the single most dangerous assignment in the world for a foreign photographer at the time.”  (more…)

Andrea Bruce December 12, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq.
Tags: ,
1 comment so far


Dinner in Ramadi, Iraq, 2008

Andrea Bruce (b.1973, American) an alumna of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After shooting as a staff photographer for The Concord Monitor and The St. Petersburg Times, she joined the staff of The Washington Post where she began to chronicle the world’s most troubled areas. She has won awards from the National Pictures of the Year competition, the White House News Photographers Association (where she has been named Photographer of the Year three times), and the John Faber award from the Overseas Press Club in New York. Andrea is currently based in Baghdad. The above photo is from her series called Unseen Iraq published in The Washington Post every week.

About the Photograph:

Sheiks in traditional robes and keffiyehs line the drawn-curtained room on regal chairs and floor cushions. Their deeply lined faces serious, they discuss problems that have come up in their regions of Ramadi, agreeing with slight, controlled nods as they massage prayer beads with flicks of their thumbs. At the end of the long, narrow room, next to a fluorescent light tube on the wall, a door opens onto the kitchen. There, women move, almost run, between a stove behind the house and the furniture-bare room, open to the summer light and heat. Towering reeds, swaying with the breeze, block the view of the Euphrates River. Children are everywhere, crying, playing with cellphones, teasing, testing their strength, while their mothers sit around a large metal bowl on the floor, slicing okra, onions and potatoes. (more…)

Farah Nosh July 28, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq.
Tags:
add a comment

Canadian-born photographer Farah Nosh graduated in 2002 from the Western Academy of Photography in Victoria, British Columbia. In September 2002 Nosh moved to Iraq where she was based for 11 months. Nosh has also worked in Lebanon, Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria. In 2005, Nosh began a large format photography project documenting the remaining fluent speakers of the threatened Haida language in northwestern Canada and southeast Alaska. Nosh’s 2006 Iraq work was published in TIME, The New York Times, American Photo and The Independent Magazine. Nosh is currently represented by Getty Images. Her awards include: Overseas Press Club of America, 2007, (POYi) 2007, PDN Nikon Storyteller Award, 2007, National Press Photographers Association, 2006, National Geographic Grant, 2006 and PDN “30 Under 30″ 2005.

About the Photograph:

Nosh is also Iraqi, but she had never known her family in Iraq before the conflict began. When the U.S.-led war against Iraq began in March 2003, she made the difficult decision to leave the compound of western journalists, working under the watchful eye of the Iraqi regime, and live isolated in a small house in western Baghdad with her family. She spent the war having hardly a sense of what was going on outside their home. Instead, Nosh has returned to Iraq repeatedly, covering both the Iraqi civilian side and embedding with American military forces.

Jacob Silberberg April 27, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq.
Tags: ,
add a comment


Iraqi Army Sgt. Bushra Jabar, Baghdad

Jacob Silberberg is a freelance photojournalist represented by Panos Pictures. From 2003 through 2005 he lived in Nigeria and photographed stories including the genocide in Darfur, oil and insurgency in the Niger Delta, and the Liberian civil war. His work has appeared in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times and London’s Sunday Telegraph. Originally from New Hampshire, he graduated from Tufts University with a degree in International Relations.

About the Photograph:

Pounding her Baghdad beat, wrapped in a bullet-proof vest and brandishing a pistol, Sgt. Bushra Jabar definitely stands out in the new Iraq. She’s the only woman in the Iraqi Army unit patrolling the Kharkh district in the heart of the Iraqi capital. “Sometimes women on the street think I’m a man, from my uniform and gun,” says Jabar, 34. “The other soldiers use a man’s version of my name to call me.” Her day starts with a ride to her base in the back of a military pickup truck. Occasionally she waves her pistol at other vehicles to get out of the way.

Geert Van Kesteren: Why Mister,Why? April 16, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq.
Tags: ,
add a comment


Iraqi Prisoners, Tikrit. August 2003

Why Mister, Why?

Born in Amsterdam, Geert Van Kesteren, first worked as a photojournalist in Iraq during Operation “Desert Fox” in 1998. He returned to Iraq in April 2003 and spent several months working on assignment for Newsweek and Stern magazines. His work has been published in many other international magazines, and has led to two books: Mwendanjangula! Aids in Zambia and Why Mister, Why?, about his experiences in Iraq. In 2004, he received the Visa d’or at the Festival Visa in Perpignan. He joined Magnum the following year. He believes that the quality of independent journalism is an index of the quality of democracy in a country. His latest book Baghdad Calling reveals everyday life in the Iraq of 2006 and 2007 through the eyes of Iraqis themselves.

About the Photograph:

“It was in an unbearable heat. Heavily armed soldiers with bullet proof vests and kevlar helmets were cramped together in a Bradley vehicle. When they opened the hedge they ran into what appeared to be a farm in the desert. A young woman wanted to hand over the keys, but the soldiers did not understand arabic and impatiently grabbed her arm, dragged her out and then kicked in doors. Insurgency was hardly active by then, but the haunt for Saddam was at full speed. A field phone and some guns were found, completely normal in the US and in Iraq. After the war I saw endless lines of grenades, bullets and other armory packed inside warehouses and schools. The US military had, by then, no interest or manpower to collect. But what could these soldiers do? They had no translator with them, could not interrogate nor understand these farmers, so they arrested all men present. You never know.” (more…)

Benjamin Lowy March 25, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Haiti.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

lowey_hati.jpg
Revolution in Haiti, 2004

Benjamin Lowy (b 1979) is currently covering the Iraq war, the same place he began his career in 2003. Since then he has worked on major stories in Afghanistan, Haiti, Indonesia, Libya, Darfur, Vietnam and India. The list goes on… His photographs from Iraq were chosen by PDN as some of the most iconic of the 21st century.

A recent contributor to the VII Photo Agency Network, Lowy’s work is visually daring. He is a photographer’s photographer. In revisiting his extensive web site I was struck by the energy of his images. He is constantly pushing the limit and approaching his subjects in new ways.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,012 other followers