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Mackenzie Reiss October 17, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ireland.
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Avilla Park, a Traveller neighborhood on the outskirts of Dublin, 2010

Mackenzie Reiss (b. 1989, United States) got her first job as a reporter at 17, and has been hooked on visual story-telling ever since. Mackenzie studied photojournalism at Syracuse University, where she spent a semester abroad in London and Ireland to further her education in photography. The self-ascribed travel junkie has been to Ireland, South Africa, Serbia and Kosovo pursuing her dream of bringing awareness to social and humanitarian issues. Her work has been recognized by the National Press Photographer’s Association, College Photographer of the Year, the Alexia Foundation for World Peace, and the Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

About the Photograph:

“This image was taken during the first of many trips to Dublin. I first came to the city on a school trip, where we visited a Traveller’s rights center called Pavee Point. Initially, I just wanted to interview a Traveller named Michael Collins for a paper I was writing. Roughly half-an-hour into our chat, he asked if I wanted to see Avilla Park- a Traveller neighborhood on the outskirts of Dublin. He drove us there in a big white van, circling the neighborhood itself and pointing out the cracks in the stucco walls, the ethnic slurs graffitied on playground structures, and the general degradation of the place.”

“I noticed a lot of children playing in the streets, and pulled my camera out of my bag. I wanted to capture the paradox of Avilla Park: youthful faces among such a sad, gray environment. At first they were quite inquisitive, asking who I was, where I was from, etc. But when the novelty of “the American” wore off, they went back to their games and that’s when I shot this frame. I played a lot with windows in this series, and the idea of being on the outside, looking in, and vice versa. Although discrimination against the Travellers isn’t nearly as bad as it was, say 50 years ago, they are still isolated and looked down upon by the greater Irish community. I wanted to show that isolation through symbolism and mood, further emphasized by the black and white processing.”

Kenneth O’Halloran September 29, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ireland.
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My Father, Corofin, County Clare, Ireland, 2010

Kenneth O’Halloran (b.1968, Ireland) graduated from the Institute of Art, Design and Technology in Dun Laoghaire. His project ‘Tales from the Promised Land’ was shortlisted for the Terry O’Neill Award 2010 and a portrait entitled Twins: Puck Fair was shown in The National Portrait Gallery in London, as part of the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize 2010. Kenneth has recently received third prize in the Portrait Stories category of the World Press Photo awards and is also the recipient of the Focus Project Monthly Award (March 2011) and has been selected for exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery (Taylor Wessing 2011). He has been published in The New Times Magazine, Paris Match, Le Monde Magazine, PDN, and the British Journal of Photography.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from the series entitled ‘Life after Death’, an intimate portrait of my Father, who turned 81 last August. Having spent half his life working, he recently retired, closing his drapery store. His undertaker’s business continues. For me and others in the family it meant that death was never far away or overtly mysterious. We became accustomed to the dead of our parish being prepared for the final ceremonies before burial. We would often come home from school to see who had died that day. The house where I grew up in the west of Ireland is where my father now resides with his wife and their daughter Susan; all the rest of the family have flown the nest, some starting families of their own, one in New York where she has become part of the Irish Diaspora. I made this image of my father with his feet in the oven a few years ago but he only saw it for the first time recently. He laughed when I showed it to him but my mother was less enthusiastic. My Dad lives a very quiet life and is devoted to his children and grandchildren. In their company he seems tranquil. At peace. His work done.”

Doug DuBois April 26, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ireland.
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Birthday Party. Cobh, Ireland, 2009

Doug DuBois (b.1960, USA) has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, The National Endowment for the Arts, SITE Santa Fe, Light Works and The John Gutmann Foundation.  His work has been exhibited and is in the collections of The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles; The Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Fine Art in Houston, the Library of Congress in Washington DC and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Doug’s photographs have have been published by The Friends of Photography, The Picture Project and in magazines including Double Take, The New York Times, Details, Black Book and The Telegraph (London) among others. A monograph of his photographs titled, All the Days and Nights was published by Aperture in the spring of 2009.

About the Photograph:

“Kevin and Erin were born one day apart. On my last day in Ireland, Kevin’s family threw a party to celebrate their eighteenth birthdays.  The tattoo belongs to Kevin’s brother. He’s saving up to add some color and a few more details, but is proud of it nonetheless. He readily hiked up his shirt for the photograph and the crowd in the backyard stepped back to make room for my camera. Erin wore her new dress, got drunk and fell asleep. Before she passed out, Erin exclaimed to no one in particular, It’s my last day at seventeen!  Kevin, whose capacity for alcohol belies his skinny frame, lasted well into the night, long after I left the party to pack for my flight home.”

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Eoin O Conaill November 23, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ireland.
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Derry, Northern Ireland, 2008

Eoin O Conaill (b.1979, Ireland) completed a B.A. in Documentary Photography at University of Wales, Newport in 2003.  Much of his work has been concerned with the idea of place and identity and his current project Common Place is a visual exploration of Ireland during the recent period of rapid cultural and economic change. He has exhibited his work in solo and group exhibitions throughout Ireland and Europe, most recently in Gallery of Photography, Dublin, ev+a International Visual Art Exhibition, Limerick, 2009, and at the International Festival of Photography, Lodz, Poland.  In 2008 he received the Belmont Mill National Award and was awarded the Gallery of Photography Artist’s Award in 2009.

About the Photograph:

“This image was made in the north of Ireland in a city called Derry and is part of a series I have made throughout the country over the past few years looking at the everyday landscape and at the often overlooked local place and space. I wanted to document the shifting visual contours of rural and urban life but also to explore the ideas and perceptions of modern Ireland. This image was made on a foggy winter morning and is of a car park attendant in his small and cluttered working environment on William Street. What interested me is that this is a part of the ordinary landscape that is in transition – the attendant has not yet been replaced by smart card speed of the newer multi-story car-parks.  The photograph holds this tension between the local and the global, that which is vanishing and that which is newly emerging.”

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Charlie Mahoney March 23, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ireland.
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Bob O’Mahony stokes the turf fire in the stove. County Cork, Ireland. 2008

Charlie Mahoney is currently based in Barcelona, Spain. His clients and publications include BBC News, The UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, National Geographic Traveler, Lonely Planet Magazine, The Times, The Times Travel Magazine and Public Radio International.  His most recent awards include the 2008 Travel Photographer of the Year, the 2008 PX3 Prix de la Photographie for photojournalism, the 2008 SOS Racism Photography contest and the new talent category of the 2007 Travel Photographer of the Year. He is represented by Bilderberg in Austria and Germany, Cosmos in France, Grazia Neri in Italy and WpN in New York.  Prior to his career in photography, he worked in investment banking and equity management.

About the Photograph:

“In 1890 John Joseph O´Mahony was born in Bawnea Kilbritain, a farmhouse, outside of Kinsale, in County Cork, Ireland. He was one of eleven children. The country was in political upheaval and jobs were scarce. He was the second eldest boy so he wasn’t going to inherit the farm, so in 1915, John boarded a ship in Cobh, Ireland and immigrated to America. He never stepped again on Irish soil. Today, his nephews Bob O´Mahony, age 80 and Dan O´Mahony, age 78, live in the house where my grandfather was born. Neither ever married, so they share the work on the farm and look after one another. They manage the land and animals using traditional methods and have modernized slowly. As Dan says, “while we be here, we’ll be doing it our way.” I lived with my cousins for a week in April 2008 while I documented their lives. It was my third visit to see them. Their way of life is quickly disappearing so I wanted to record it for future generations of the O’Mahony clan.”

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