jump to navigation

Benedicte Desrus October 1, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Federico Gomez Children´s Hospital in Mexico City 2012

Benedicte Desrus (b. 1976, France) is 
represented by Sipa Press and covers breaking news for Reuters. Currently based in Mexico City, she has worked throughout Europe, East Africa, the United States and Latin America. Her work has appeared in: The New York Times, Harper’s magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Time, Courrier International, Le Monde, Marie Claire and The Sunday Times Magazine among others. She has earned numerous awards including the Open Society Institute’s Moving Walls exhibition (2011), the XIV Luis Valtueña International Humanitarian Photography (2011) Award and NPPA’s Best of Photojournalism (2012).

About the Photograph:

“Ubaldo Alexis Garcia Lopez is treated by doctors at an emergency room in the Federico Gomez Children´s Hospital in Mexico City for symptoms related to severe morbid obesity. Mexico holds the first place worldwide in childhood obesity and public health officials are increasingly alarmed by the rapid rise in child and youth obesity. About one-third of children in Mexico are now classified as either overweight or obese. Recently diabetes, of which obesity is a contributing factor, has become the number one cause of death in Mexico. Like many people I thought obesity was an epidemic only in developed countries, but it soon became apparent that it’s a global epidemic, one that will have a profound effect on society, economy, and most of all humanities health. The increase in obesity is happening faster in developing countries than in the developed World. “

Trevor Snapp August 6, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Sante Muerte Celebration. Mexico City 2009

Trevor Snapp (b.1980, United States) is committed to long term projects and experimentation in his work. He has been photographing in East Africa, focusing on South Sudan since 2009. His photographs have been featured in The New York Times, The Guardian, Newsweek, Time, National Geographic Traveler, BBC, and Stern. With a degree in Anthropology and African Studies his photo stories strive to explain and explore the deeper issues behind the headlines. He has devoted much of the last three years covering the birth of South Sudan and the regional repercussions. Along with the journalist Alan Boswell, he is partnering with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to produce an iPad book called Milk and Blood: The Making of South Sudan. His photos were exhibited at the Lumix Young Photojournalism festival in Germany in June 2012. Trevor is represented by Corbis

About the Photograph:

“This photo is from an ongoing story about a monthly gathering in Tipito that attracts devotees from across the city. Tipito is an infamously violent market neighborhood in the center of Mexico city. During the celebration of Santa Muerte the streets are peaceful as people gather to bless each others statues. They trade trinkets and candy, cigar smoke and perfumes sprays before returning home to their daily lives. Sante Muerte is a rapidly growing cult in Mexico. Devotees worship statues of Sante Muerte (translated as Holy Death or Saint Death). The Saint is a religious figure combining traditional Mexican day of the dead celebrations with Catholic saints and pop culture ideas of death, particularly horror films.”

“Once only criminals and prostitutes worshiped the saint, but it is expanding among the disenfranchised poor of Mexico. The rampant drug violence has only fueled the growth as people turn to Santa Muerte for love, protection and luck. Many people pray to this figure for miracles. Santa Muerte is especially popular among young people who don’t feel connected to the traditions of the church, but continue to desire a spiritual life. Santa Muerta is also an important Saint for the violent narco culture. The rapid growth of the cult is challenging the Catholic powers that have long ruled this country. What is so interesting about the event is that it changes every month as the devotees literally make up a religion. One month everyone is giving each other apples, the next month, people will gather to serenade Saint Death with a Mariachi band. I plan to continue following this story for several years documenting this uniquely organic religion that captures many of the largest issues that Mexico is dealing with toda.”

Erin Siegal July 9, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico, United States.
Tags: ,
comments closed


Border fence into the USA, Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, 2012.

Erin Siegal (b. 1982) is an Ethics and Justice Journalism Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism, and a Redux Pictures photographer. Erin was a 2008-2009 fellow at the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. She is the author of two books, Finding Fernanda, which examines a dramatic case of international adoption corruption between the U.S and Guatemala, and “The U.S. Embassy Cables: Adoption Fraud in Guatemala, 1987-2010.” Finding Fernanda was issued a 2011 Overseas Press Club Award Citation for Best Reporting on Latin America, and earned a 2011 James Madison Freedom of Information Award. Her photos have appeared in TIME, Newsweek, the New York Times, and various other outlets. Erin is currently based in Tijuana, Mexico.

About The Photograph:

“This is where the border meets the sea, the place where México and the United States cease being separate countries. The man looking through the fence is looking at the United States. Since the U.S. Congress passed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996, a record number of people have been deported. Under the current law, every non-citizen convicted of an “aggravated felony”offense is subject to permanent, mandatory deportation. There’s no fighting it, and no prosecutorial discretion. The list of crimes qualifying as ‘aggravated felonies’ and trigger automatic deportation is lengthy, and includes non-violent drug offenses and even some misdemeanors. Human rights advocates as well as the Inter-American Court of Human Rights have criticized the mandatory nature of deportations under this law. In the first three years of his presidency alone, Barack Obama has removed approximately 1.2 million immigrants, more than any other president in U.S. history.”

Alejandro Cartagena May 10, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Ciudad Juárez, Mexico 2009

Alejandro Cartagena (b. 1977 Dominican Republic) lives in Monterrey, Mexico. His work has been exhibited and published internationally, and is in several public and private collections in Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Italy, and the United States. He is the recipient of several major national grants, numerous honorable mentions and acquisition prizes in Mexico and abroad. In 2009 Alejandro won the Critical Mass Book Award, and was named one of PDN´s 30 emerging photographers. He was also a finalist for the Aperture Portfolio Prize, selected as an “International Discovery” at the Houston FOTOFEST,  a featured artist at the Lishui International Photography Festival in Lishui China and the Contact Festival in Toronto. He is currently on the Faculty of Visual Arts at the University of Nuevo Leon and is represented by Circuit Gallery in Toronto.

About the Photograph:

“This image is the last photograph of my Suburbia Mexicana book. It’s project dealing with the Mexican suburbanization of the past decade and how peoples aspirations of home ownership have transformed the landscape in the periphery and other urban structures of Mexican cities. I developed the work in five different stages which broadly addressed causes and effects of these new suburbs. After doing the portraits for the project I decided to do a picture of the houses. I felt that it could be a great point of comparison between the images of these houses when they are new and what happens to them over a period of three or four years. I used to work in that suburb years ago and saw the subtle changes occur and once I starting taking pictures I felt I could represent my thoughts on this “process of progress”. So in the book you start with almost pristine looking suburbs where everything is brightly painted and clean and you finish with houses that are not houses anymore; a sort of humanization of architecture.”

Kirsten Luce March 29, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Funeral in Cieneguilla, Mexico, 2007

Kirsten Luce (b. 1981, USA) freelances in Brooklyn where she is a regular contributor to the New York Times. She graduated with  a B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Georgia and received the NAFTA Journalism and Globalization Grant to study in Colima, Mexico. Kirsten was a staff photographer for The Monitor on the Texas/Mexico border. Her work has been published in The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Associated Press, Bloomberg News, CARE International and National Geographic Adventure. She is the coordinator for the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop, a non-profit documentary workshop held in a different country each year.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken on assignment for the Monitor, a newspaper in McAllen, Texas, along the Mexican border. We were reporting the story of a young man named Moises who had died of dehydration while avoiding a border patrol checkpoint along the highway to San Antonio. In South Texas, these checkpoints are situated about 60 miles north of the border on all highways heading north. Migrants face two major obstacles while crossing the border: first is the Rio Grande River, which is relatively easy if you know how to swim, and the second is a long walk through the hot, remote brush land to avoid the checkpoint. Although these casualties occur with regularity in the Monitor’s coverage area, they were typically reported as statistics or briefs since little was known about the individuals themselves. I wanted to tell the story of one of these people and shed light on their individual circumstances and motivations.” (more…)

Jake Price November 28, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Migrants in Lecheria, Mexico 2008

Jake Price (b. 1973, United States) saved up for his first camera with change he had scraped together when he was 17 and has been photographing ever since.  He is currently working on a long term project in Haiti and Japan examining both countries response to their natural disasters. Jake’s work has taken him to Sierra Leone, Uganda, Kenya, China, Pakistan amongst other countries. His photographs have appeared in the New York Times, TIME, Rolling Stone, Orion and Newsweek, Le Monde II , BBC Online and in publications throughout the world.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photo in Lecheria, a rundown violent crossroads just outside of Mexico City. Migrants, mainly form Central America, ride freight trains to Lecheria and then wait for another train to take them to various points north along the US/Mexico border. I arrived at dawn and worked throughout the day. Upon arrival in the blue morning, the atmosphere felt ominous with billowing exhaust from nearby factories. By the time the migrants reach Lecheria they are destitute, most at that point have been robbed, the women sexually assaulted. Some die on the way and do not make it at all. This picture was taken in the afternoon as the sun was trying to make its way though a hazy sky which finally broke in the afternoon. Despite the warmth, the young who scavenged and slept along the tracks were cold shivering in the sunlight. While scavenging they searched for whatever might be of use to them—in this case the young guy found a tattered piece of plastic sheeting which could be used as a cover, a jacket, a tent along the way north. Because most had everything stripped from them just about anything they found was made use of in multiple ways.” (more…)

Eirini Vourloumis May 6, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Mexico City 2007

Eirini Vourloumis (b.1979, Greece) is a freelance photographer focusing on features and reportage. Her work has focused mostly on exploring Islamic communities in the United States. She is currently a contributing freelance photographer to the New York Times and has relocated to Greece from New York to document the ongoing current economic crisis. She is also a contributing writer for Lens, the New York Times photojournalism blog. She is a graduate of Parsons School of Design and of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism in New York. Her work has been published in the New York Times, New York Magazine, The Financial Times Magazine, and The Daily Independent, among others. She has also worked as a photo assistant at Life Books and Life Magazine and as a freelance photo editor at Newsweek.

About the Photograph:

“Mexico City has nearly two million underprivileged children and young adults who live on the streets; some 240,000 of these are abandoned children. Most are addicted to paint thinner and glue sniffing. I decided to document these issues through Casa Transitorio, a shelter for young boys who are in the process of reforming from street life to a more positive and stable daily routine. Run by El Caracol, a non-profit organization, they are given a home with an open door policy where they are provided medication to help wean them off drugs, taught different working skills and are offered basic classes in subjects ranging from reading to music. This photograph was taken on our way to a wholesale grocery market where the boys transport food to their shelter. This image reflects the daily life and struggles faced by countless youths in Mexico City mirroring the aspirations of those in the bus who used to be in the same position but are hoping and working towards a better future.”

Carlos Alvarez Montero March 21, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


From the Project “Scars” Mexico City 2010

Carlos Alvarez Montero (b.1974, Mexico) is a native from Mexico city. His work focuses on the relationship between appearance and the creation of identity. After 12 years of working in Mexico City for editorial clients, ad agencies and record labels he decided to take his photography to higher levels by moving to New York to complete a two year MFA program in photography, video and related media at the School of Visual Arts (SVA). During a two year absence from the Mexican photography scene he roamed the streets of New York capturing the diversity of it’s inhabitants. This led him to several projects like Harlem Shuffle, Covers (Adopt & Adapt) and Super heroes.  Carlos lives and works between New York and Mexico City.

About the Photograph:

“These two portraits of Amra & Ana Paula are from my series Scars. Ana Paula plays in a band called La Maria Antonieta and Amra is a tattoo and visual artist. I photographed 20 residents of Mexico city that have decided to engrave ink marks on their neck/face (body parts that cannot be hidden) as a statement of their life experiences ‘good or bad’ in one of the largest cities in the world. At the same time this allows them to step out of the crowd, define themselves as unique, and by no means look back. Since my work focuses on the way people create their identity through their appearance I always let my subjects decide how to show themselves. With this portrait series I intend to create a projection of the city through human maps composed of scars and facial expressions. The life marks of itʼs inhabitants.”

Dominic Bracco ll November 24, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Ciudad Juarez, Mexico 2010

Dominic Bracco ll (b. 1986, Texas USA) specializes in documenting the effects of Mexican and North American policies on the border region where he was raised. He has degrees in journalism and Spanish literature from The University of Texas at Arlington. He is a regular contributor to The Washington Post, where he was selected for a six-month internship in 2008, and The Wall Street Journal. He is also founding member of the collective Prime. He pays rent in a coastal Mexican village, but often finds himself in other countries.

About the Photograph:

“I shot this image at the funeral of 15-year-old Sergio Adrian Hernandez Guereca, who was killed on June 7th by a Border Patrol agent in Ciudad Juarez on June 10, 2010. According to eyewitnesses the shooting occurred after Guereca helped guide several other teenagers into the United States when they were spotted and retreated back to Mexico. One of their group was detained by the U.S. Border Patrol and at least one of the boys threw a rock from the Mexican border into the United States toward the Border Patrol agent upon which he returned fire at the group, firing several rounds, and hitting Guereca in the head. The killing sparked much controversy over the use of force across international borders and sat uneasy in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico where over 1,000 killings have happened as a result of the insecurity caused by the war on drugs. There are still many questions unanswered about what exactly happened on June 7th near the international bridge as there are conflicting reports from the agent and eye witnesses.”

Brian L Frank October 13, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Gerardo, Tepito, Mexico City 2008

Brian L Frank (b.1979, USA) studied photojournalism at San Francisco State University. During an extended break from school, he drove an old VW Beetle across Mexico, landing in Mexico City, where he lived and worked until August 2009. Based in San Francisco again, he continues to work in Mexico as well as Southern California. He was recently awarded the 2010 Global Vision Award by POYi for “Downstream: The Death of the Colorado,” and the 2009 NPPA Domestic News Picture Story of the year for “La Guerra Mexicana.” A frequent contributor to The Wall Street Journal, his work has appeared in Esquire, Newsweek, TIME, Le Monde, Photo District News, The New York Times and many other publications. His archive is syndicated through Redux Pictures, New York.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph of Gerardo was the way I gained access to Mexico City’s infamous barrio Tepito. I found myself fascinated with Tepito not because it was one of the toughest neighborhoods in Latin America, but because I was fascinated with the worship of La Santa Muerte “Saint Death”, a hybrid form of ancient Aztec and Catholic death worship. In recent years Santa Muerte has grown from a fringe practice mostly followed by those involved with the crime culture, to a mainstream movement with thousands of worshipers. The most famous altar for La Santa Muerte is in Tepito. (more…)

Livia Corona May 17, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Mexico, 2008

Livia Corona (b.1975, Mexico) is a graduate of Art Center College of Design and a recent Guggenheim Fellow. Corona’s photographs have been exhibited nationally and internationally. Her photography and texts have been featured in numerous publications. Corona was winner of the Architecture Category of the Sony World Photography Award in Cannes, winner of the Architecture Category of the Paris Prix de la Photographie, a finalist for ING’s REAL Photography Award in Rotterdam and nominated by the jury of the Lucie Awards in New York as “International Photographer of the Year.  Her books include: Of People and Houses (HDA, Austria, 2009) and Enanitos Toreros (PowerHouse Books, New York, 2008). She lives in New York and Mexico City.

About the Photograph:

“Since 2006, through my project “Two Million Homes for Mexico” I’ve explored the circumstances related to massive housing developments in Mexico. In remote, agrarian lands throughout the country, from 2000 to this date, almost three million nearly identical homes have been built in groups of 100 to 80,000.  When driving through these neighborhoods, one sees endless rows of 100 to 200 square foot homes where constructions have reduced what is actual community building to the mere construction of housing. This type of urbanization prototype, now prevalent in Mexico, marks a profound change in the shaping of our experience as citizens of a broader world. In my photographs I am particularly interested in the effects of these neighborhoods as cultural backdrop, and their role in forming the perspective of the younger generations who live in these neighborhoods through key formative years. This photograph is of a neighborhood of over 47,000 nearly identical homes.”

Bookmark and Share

Mark Powell April 19, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Mexico City, 2008

Mark Powell (b. 1968, United States) has a B.A. in Latin American Literature from the University of Michigan. His career includes shows at: The New Museum and the Queens Museum in New York, El Museo Archivo de la Fotografia in Mexico City, Ten Haaf Gallery in Amsterdam, Foto España in Madrid among others. Mark is the subject and/or author of books and articles, including Very Important Person, (Diamantina, 2006) and Street Photography Now (Thames and Hudson) to be published in late 2010. He is currently working on his second monograph sponsored by The Televisa Foundation entitled Mexico XXI and also working on his first documentary as a cinematographer in a film (Bellas de Noche) depicting the Mexican Cabaret stars from the 1970’s and 80’s.

About the Photograph:

This was taken in the Iztapalapa barrio of Mexico City. It was a shoot for the album cover of a Tijuana singer known as Faca for the Nuevos Ricos record label. We crossed a part of an Iztapalapa intersection that reminded me of a border  town feeling- it really could have been Tijuana. A kid rode by on his BMX bike and I asked him if I could quickly borrow it. Faca straddled the bike as the sun was going down. It gave it all an illusion of scale and formality of personality that fit well with her music project. She improvises long distance with a DJ in Argentina and the electric wires gave it the extra boost of symbolism of long distance communication.”

Bookmark and Share

Francesco Lastrucci February 1, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Dìa de los Agelitos. Oaxaca, Mexico 2009

Francesco Lastrucci (b. 1977, Italy) is a freelance photographer who focuses on editorial stories. After initially studying architecture he moved to Stockholm. He is currently based between Italy, New York and Hong Kong working on projects in Europe, Latin America and East Asia. His work has appeared in major North American, European and Asian magazines. Among them The New York Times, CNN and Condè Nast publications.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photo in Oaxaca, Mexico during the day of the dead celebrations. November first honors the souls of the departed childrens and infants and it’s called day of the little angels. While religious gatherings and offers take place by the graves in the cemeteries around town, a more pagan celebration is held around town with many parades ending up in the Zocalo, the core of the old town. People dress up and while all this can remind of some of the most typical Halloween parades, the theme of the death is much stronger here shows a strong relationship with the traditions and ancestries of this land. I was looking for an image that could symbolize the theme of the “dia de los angelitos”. I was wandering through the dense crowd that was filling the square when I noticed the angel, surrounded by grotesque skull figures.”

Radhika Chalasani November 16, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Algodones, Mexico, 2005

Radhika Chalasani (b. 1966, USA) spent six years living in Asia where she covered Vietnam as it emerged from years of isolation. Then later moved to Kenya to cover news events including the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide, the beginning of the civil war in Zaire, and famine in Sudan. Radhika’s work from Africa was shown at the Visa Pour l’Image Festival in Perpignan, France and received four awards in the POY competition in the U.S. She received the “Prix Special du Jury” at the Festival International du Scoop et Journalism in Angers, France for her images of famine in Sudan. Her work has also been selected twice for The Communication Arts Photography Annual as well as exhibited in several group shows. Her most recent work on Indian widows, and Hurricane Graffiti received recognition in the 2007 International Photography Awards with ASMP.

About the Photograph:

“I thought this photo perfectly illustrated what was going on in that tiny town with over twenty pharmacies and two hundred dentists. U.S. Customs estimates that one million seniors cross at that point each day in the winter months mostly to buy medications that are cheaper than in the U.S. even with medicare. It’s actually illegal to bring the medications into the U.S. but the customs people let it all go through. I assume because they don’t want to be seen throwing seniors in jail. The irony was that my first day there I was the only one who got called aside for questioning because they’d never seen an American passport with so many stamps and extra pages added in. I was probably the only person not bringing illegal imports in! Most of the seniors go there every year and had nothing but good things to say about the quality of care they received or the quality of medications they purchased.”

Bookmark and Share

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,579 other followers