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Faseeh Shams July 11, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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Snake Charmer. Lahore, Pakistan 2012

Faseeh Shams (b. 1984, Pakistan) began his career wandering in northern Pakistan with a small point and shoot camera. He later earned his MBA in Human Resources and an MA in Marketing and worked as a brand marketing consultant for a firm in England. Faseeh’s work has been published in Newsweek, the BBC and Reuters among other publications. His photographs have been exhibited at Punjab University and Gallery 320. He is currently based in Lahore, Pakistan but frequently travels to Iran, Afghanistan and the UK.

About the Photograph:

“My daughter, he proudly boasted ‘She is the queen of all tribes living here. One day she will be the best snake catcher of all Pakistan.’ Shazia was barely five years old, the youngest family member of the clan who had their tents parked outside Lahore in an abandoned lot. Snake charming is an art and a profession. It originated in India where it was a religious requirement. Before Hinduism, snake worship was one of the ancient religions. Snake worship had special temples, Gods and deities. Hindus practiced the arts of charming which included treating snake bite victims and herbal treatments for various ailments. It was a Hindu discipline but later other castes and groups in Sindh, Bengal and Punjab also acquired the skill. The art of snake charming is becoming a rare breed. In Pakistan it’s dying because it doesn’t pay. Forty years ago charmers walked the streets and were invited into homes. On Eid, Saperas dressed in long kurtas, colored turbans and necklaces made of beads and shells would show up and perform with their snakes.”

Sam Phelps February 6, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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From the Series ‘Train Portraits’. Pakistan 2010

Sam Phelps (b. 1981, Australia) completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Digital Media at the College of Fine Arts, Sydney in 2003. He worked as an Assistant Photographer on fashion shoots before embarking on his first dedicated endevour into the world of documentary photography in mid 2007. After crossing the Khyber Pass to Kabul he subsequently became embedded with one of the US Coalition forces that was responsible for provincial reconstruction. His most recent story documents Qat production and consumption in Yemen. He has shot assignment and been published with publications including Time, The Times UK, Liberation and Der Spiegel.  Sam recently completed an internship with VII Photo agency Paris and is currently based in Pakistan.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken on the Khyber Mail, a Pakistani mail and passenger train that travels from Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and terminates in Karachi, Pakistan’s largest city at the southern tip of Sindh province on the Arabian Sea after 35 hours travel. It is the first portrait I took as part of an ongoing series titled ‘Train Portraits’. The subject was the train conductor and somebody good to have on your side when undertaking a project of this nature given he could decide to call the police authorities riding in the carriages at any time and shut down the shoot. His name was Muhammad Baghah Mughal, a 43 year old devout Muslim fasting during the month of Ramadan. I was attracted to his spotless white uniform, a remnant of colonial pre partition India Pakistan and the rail lines that were laid within the sub continent to unify the British Raj.”

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Michele Borzoni June 27, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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Christian Wedding, Islamabad, Pakistan

Michele Borzoni (b. 1979 , Italy) graduated  from the International Center of Photography in the Documentary Photography and Photojournalism Program in 2006. He attended the Eddie Adams Workshop, Barnstorm XIX. His work has been awarded with the First Prize Yann Geffroy Award 2007 with his work “Srebrenica, struggle for justice”, the New York Times Scholarship for ICP students, and in 2009 he received the Tierney Fellowship. In 2010 he won the first prize of the World Press Photo in the People in the News singles category. From 2006 he has been working with Italian and international magazines among with D della Repubblica, Vanity Fair, Magazine, Elle, Io Donna, Newsweek, Marie Clair France, Newsweek, Internazionale, L’Espresso, Financial Times Magazine, Amica, Le Monde2, Geo and others.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of a series about the Christian minority in Pakistan. In particular, people are celebrating a Christian wedding in the “Hundred Quarter” Christian colony, one of the seven Christian ghettos of Islamabad. Relatives hang money on the bridegrooms head as a sign of happiness. What interested me was the mixture of  Christian and the Punjabi traditional culture. In the big cities of Pakistan most of the Christians live in ghettos called “colonies”. As a consequence of the cast system legacy, the majority of Christians work in the cleaning and sanitary field. Kind of like untouchables.”

Daniel Berehulak January 14, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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Floods in Muzaffargarh. Punjab, Pakistan 2010

Daniel Berehulak (b.1975, Australia) is a New Delhi based photographer for the Getty Images News Service covering the South Asia region and beyond. A native of Sydney, Australia, Daniel studied History at the University of New South Wales. He joined Getty Images in 2002 in Sydney and relocated to London as a staff news photographer in 2005. Daniel’s photos have appeared in publications such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Guardian, The Independent, Stern, Time, Newsweek and many more. Daniel’s recent awards include: Photograph of the year, three gold prizes, one silver and one award of excellence. China International Press Photo Contest. First Prize News Folio of the Year, The Press Photographer’s Year Awards. (2010) Honorable mention, UNICEF Photo of the Year (2009). Third  prize People In the News category, World Press Photo (2007).

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken in a flood relief camp run by the Pakistan Army for flood affected victims from Pakistan’s biggest flood in the country’s history, in August 2010. I had been covering the floods for a few weeks now and came across a large size camp near on the outskirts of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan. The children in these photos were the lucky ones, whose families has been accepted into the relief camp. Millions of people had been displaced by the flooding and over 20 million affected. I had seen so many others on the sides of roads begging for food and waiting for handouts from passing motorists. These children had been waiting over two hours in a queues, waiting with their empty pots, waiting to get a few spoon-fulls of soup for their dinner.”

Massimo Berruti March 24, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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Supporters of the “Pakistan Muslim League”. Rawalpindi, Pakistan 2008

Massimo Berruti (b.1979, Italy) completed a short course in photography in 2003. and has since been freelancing in Eastern Europe and Italy where he worked on stories about immigration, suburbs and the Industry crisis. In 2007 he began traveling in central Asia, particularly Pakistan and Afghanistan doing projects on social and political issues. His photographs have been published in l’Espresso, Internazionale, D la Repubblica delle Donne, Le Monde 2 and The Independent. Massimo received the second prize for his reportage on contemporary issues at the World Press Photo 2007, and  also received the Jury Special Mention at the Scoop International Festival of Angers in 2008. The same year he was selected for the 15th Joop Swart Master Class and received the International Photography Award. In 2009, he won the Perpignan Young Reporter’s Award.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photo of supporters of PML-N (Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz) in Rawalpindi during the speech of one of their main local leaders. It was my first time in Pakistan. I went there to cover the presidential elections that were taking place just a couple of months after the Benazir Bhutto Assassination. People was still deeply shocked by that event and the fear, rage, hope and happiness were all melted together in a highly confused atmosphere. In this melted emotions I recognized mine. What drew me to take this photograph was the man in the middle. He appeared so calm surrounded by the others, all shouting and singing in a kind of state of ecstasy.”

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Aaron Huey April 30, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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Sufi shrine in the city of Multan, Pakistan

Aaron Huey grew up in a small town in Wyoming on the edge of a field that grew both beets and barley, alternating each year to enrich the soil quality. Huey escaped small town Wyoming only to find himself living in an old Communist apartment complex in Bratislava, Slovakia, where, at the age of 18, he studied as a Rotary Scholar. For his work on Pine Ridge Indian reservation he won second place from POYi and was shortlisted for the Alexia grant in addition to being featured at the Festival Visa in Perpignan. Aaron was named PDN’s top 30 emerging photographers in 2007 and was recently awarded a National Geographic Expedition Council Grant to hitchhike across Siberia.

About the Photograph:

“These images were taken during a month long trip through the shrines of Pakistan in 2006. I hope that these photographs can begin to balance out all the images of burning effigies, violent Anti-American protests, IED attacks, and suicide bombers, that consistently appear on the covers of our newspapers and magazines. These images over time, will become a window into a world of music, dance, poetry, and above all LOVE in Islam, something we rarely see in the western press.”

This essay begins in Pakistan and will expand through 2008 and 2009 to include a look at Sufism all over the world. Sufism, or Mystic Islam, is a school of Islam that transcends the division of Sunni and Shia, offering a message of Peace and Love through Music (Qawwali), dance the dervishes in their many forms, and poetry the poetry of Hafiz, Rumi, and countless others.

Pieter Ten Hoopen April 21, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
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Aftermath of Earthquake in Balakot, Pakistan. 2005

Born 1974 in Tubbergen, Netherlands Pieter Ten Hoopen moved to Sweden 1999. He studied photojournalism at Nordens Fotoskola and has been working for four years as a photojournalist. He has been published extensively and teaches photojournalism in Scandinavia. He is represented by Agence VU in France and Moment Agency in Sweden. His work was awarded first price in the daily life stories for World Press Photo 2008 in addition to being Press Photographer of the Year in Sweden twice. His work from Pakistan was also shown at visa pour in Perpignan, 2006.

About the Photograph:

“This image was taken about one month after the earthquake in Pakistan. People were still coming down from the mountains trying to find shelter and were suffering from trauma. Winter was on the way and the need for shelter was urgent. This father with his child had been collecting food. I spent ten days in Balakot documenting the situation after the quake. People were still digging for their family members.”

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