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Paccarik Orue August 7, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Delivering cheese and milk, Cerro de Pasco, Peru. 2013

Paccarik Orue (b.1976, Peru) currently resides in San Francisco where he earned a BFA in photography from the Academy of Art University. As an immigrant, Paccarik is interested in themes of social relevance and the relationship between people and the environment. His work has been shown at SF Camerawork, Book & Job Gallery, Carte Blanche, Contemporary Art Center New Orleans and it has been featured in Conscientious, Fototazo, Feature Shoot and Lenscratch among others. He is the recipient of En Foco’s NewWorks Photography Award Fellowship #17. Paccarik’s first monograph, There is Nothing Beautiful Around here, was published by Owl & Tiger Books in 2012.

About the Photograph:

“This image, Repartiendo queso y leche (delivering cheese and milk,) is from my ongoing project entitled El Muqui. The project is about environmental problems, folkloric and cultural traditions in the mining city of Cerro de Paso, in the Peruvian Andes, and how these elements coexist with each other. It is important for me that this body of work captures the desire of the inhabitants of Cerro de Pasco to live a normal life under such harsh conditions caused by the pollution of mining activities. The image speaks about such desire. I had seen this woman making deliveries earlier but I was unable to catch up with her. A few days later I happened to be taking photos near the home of one of her customers and finally made her portrait.”

Elie Gardner January 28, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Puno, Peru 2011

Elie Gardner (b. 1984, United States) received her Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Missouri and currently freelances with INTI Media, a multimedia collective that she co-founded with Oscar Durand in Lima, Peru. Prior to that she worked as a multimedia editor and photographer at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Elie has also taught for National Geographic Student Expeditions in Bar Harbor, London and Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands. She was awarded scholarships to participate in the Summer Fellows Program at the Poynter Institute in 2006, the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop in Buenos Aires in 2011 and the Missouri Photo Workshop in 2012. She now produces multimedia stories for NGOs and  magazines  related to health, the environment and social inequality.

About the Photograph:

“In January 2011 I was still adjusting to the food, language and culture in my new home, Lima, Peru, when INTI Media landed a gig in Puno – 3,800 meters above sea level – to tell a story for a North American NGO. I boarded the plane with nerves, flu-like symptoms and hoped the altitude wouldn’t make things worse. It was my first freelance job in Peru. Just as the sun was coming up our first day in the field we stopped along the side of the road for breakfast. On one side of the road I could see the shores of Lake Titicaca. On the other side I noticed this young shepherd with her alpaca. We exchanged a few glances, and I lifted my camera to make a few frames. We both smiled and there was something about her that reminded me of myself as a little girl on the North Dakotan prairie where I grew up. Everything foreign slowly became more familiar. My nerves, headache and butterflies in my stomach were gone.”

Oscar Durand March 1, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Lima, Peru 2011

Oscar Durand (b. 1979, Peru) became interested in visual storytelling while studying engineering in Lima, Perú – his hometown. Upon graduation, Oscar moved to the United States where he enrolled in the the photojournalism program at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York. Since launching his freelance career, Oscar’s work has been featured in publications such as the Newark Star Ledger, New York Times, Dallas Morning News and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He has also worked in South America with non-governmental organizations. In 2010 Oscar moved back to Lima, Perú, to focus on stories related to social and environmental issues in Latin America.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photo a few months after returning to my home country, Peru. I was away for almost nine years and since then many things have changed. This made every photography outing, every assignment twice as interesting, an opportunity to discover the world around me again. In my early teens I did some skateboarding. Though I never got too serious about it, I always found this culture fascinating. This photo was taken at a new skate park in Limal. The person photographed is the skate park designer, test riding the ramp the day before the inauguration. It was part of an assignment to illustrate a story about sports on wheels in Lima, a growing pastime for Limeños.”

Valerio Bispuri October 27, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Chorrillos Women’s Prison. Lima, Peru 2008

Valerio Bispuri (b.1971, Italy) graduated from university with degree in literature and has been a journalist and photo-reporter since 2001. Valerio’s photographs have been published in some of Italy’s major newspapers and magazines including: L’Espresso, Venerdi de Repubblica and L’Internazionale. His work has been exhibited in Italy, in Spain, Argentina and at Visa pour l’Image in 2011. Valerio recently received a special mention at the POYi Latin America. He is currently working on a story about the effects of the drug Paco or Pasta base de cocaína, that is killing many young people in South America.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photo in a woman’s prison in Lima, Peru. It’s part of a ten year project about seventy four prisons in Latin America. I first made contact with prisoners and guards and felt their fear and anger, but also their hope and indifference. Some convicts considered me a distraction, others looked at me with envy, others again with contempt because they thought that I was there only for taking pictures to sell of their confined life. Every jail was a way to tell the country from inside and outside. Even if everything seems to be just a reflex of violence, the contrast between life and violence belongs to one line. This corresponds to the history of South America.”

Roberto Guerra July 6, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Gold miner and Dredge, Madre de Dios, Peru 2010

Roberto Guerra (b. 1973, USA) is a photographer who focuses on humanitarian, environmental, and social issues around the world, with a focus on Latin America. He works regularly with indigenous and immigrant populations, as well as with progressive non-profit organizations working for human rights and the environment. His photo essays and images are published by the BBC, Orion Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Boston Globe Magazine, NPR Digital, OnEarth, and many others; and his work has been exhibited in the USA, Spain, Mexico, and Norway. In recent years, Bear has been a finalist for a National Magazine Award in Photojournalism (2010), and the recipient of funding from the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting and Project Word. A native of San Antonio, TX, he is currently based in Southern California.

About the Photograph:

“I made this image while on an assignment near Peru’s Southeastern border with Bolivia, where unregulated gold mining is spreading into the jungle at an alarming rate and leaving behind severe environmental consequences, including massive deforestation and mercury-contaminated waterways. With the price of gold at an all time high on the international market, as well as open-door trade policies and lax regulation by Peruvian president, Alan Garcia’s, administration, there has been an explosion of the extractive industries in Peru’s resource-rich Amazon basin in the last few years. It was very difficult to gain access to mining settlements deep in the jungle where I found widespread deforestation and gaping pits in what only months before was pristine jungle; and immigrants from the Andean highlands and Brazil wrecking the environment, their own bodies, and the health of their families in the hope of eking out a better living than they could at home.”

Hector Emanuel October 29, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Peruvian earthquake aftermath

Hector Emanuel is a Peruvian-born photojournalist with a Master’s degree in physics, his photos focus mainly on social and political issues in Latin America and the US. In 2003, he was awarded by the World Press Photo Foundation (and the NPPA’s Best of Photojournalism) for his documentation of the civil conflict in Colombia. His photographs have been widely exhibited and he regularly contributes to books, newspapers, magazines (Time, Newsweek, Men’s Journal, Washington Post Sunday Magazine, Washingtonian, etc) and NGO’s (American Red Cross, Greenpeace and Amnesty International). Recently he has been applying his understated documentary style of photography to a variety of magazine portrait assignments.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken while covering the aftermath of an 8.0 magnitude earthquake in Peru for the Red Cross. The earthquake left over 500 dead and over 100,000 homeless. The people in the photo were standing by the side of the road with signs asking for food, water or any other help. Like many of the people in the area they were not only homeless and worried about their future, but also psychologically scarred. I always feel pretty useless – I don’t mean photographically – when covering this kind of story, but it’s even more obvious when shooting for the Red Cross because when one arrives in a car with the Red Cross symbol people have the expectation that you will know how to help them.”

David Rochkind September 5, 2008

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Bertha Luz Andrade, La Oroya, Peru, 2007

David Rochkind is a freelance photographer who has focused on Latin America for the past five years while living in Caracas, Venezuela. His work generally focuses on the point where economic and social needs of communities meet and how that balance affects the overall well being of the population. His clients include The New York Times, Time Magazine, Stern, Glamour and CARE. In 2008 he was named as one of Photo District News’ “30 New and Emerging Photographers to Watch” and was also awarded an International Reporting Project Fellowship at Johns Hopkins University.

About the Photograph:

“Bertha Luz Andrade had cancer and died a few weeks after this photograph was taken in her home in La Oroya, Peru. La Oroya is one of the most polluted places on the planet, owing to a metal smelting plant that has emitted toxic gases for more than 80 years. This pollution is having a devastating effect on the community nestled next to the plant. According to a study by the University of St. Louis nearly all of the children in the town have lead poisoning and local doctors say that the health problems include other forms of metal poisoning, like arsenic, and higher incidences of cancer. The town of La Oroya grew up around the plant and is economically dependent on the very industry that is poisoning them. (more…)

Mads Nissen June 27, 2008

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Iquitos, Peru, Amazonas 2007

Mads Nissen (Denmark, b 1979) has worked on photographic projects about the food crisis in Niger, a children’s home in Ghana, Revolutionary Carnival in Cuba and daily life in the tallest building in Denmark. Two recent works include a story about overpopulation in Manila and a personal voyage into the Amazon rain forest. He graduated from The Danish School of Journalism. In 2004-2006 he was staff photographer at the Danish national newspaper Dagbladet Politiken. His awards include: Winner of the Best Danish Press Photo of the Year and POYi: Issue Reporting Picture Story/ Award Of Excellence both in 2007. His clients include: Newsweek, Stern and several NGO’s including Care International. He is currently based in Shanghai, China and is represented by Getty Images.

About the Photograph:

The houses in the shantytown of Belen Bajo in Peru are built on rafts or tall poles because of the ever changing water levels of the Amazon, which floods the area by several meters for four months every year. On its long journey from the Peruvian Andes to its mouth in the Atlantic, the Amazon takes up an area as large as that of Australia. It is the largest river in the world and within the rain forest are 40,000 species of plants and over 30 million kinds of insects.

Elyse Butler/Aevum Photo April 18, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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butler_peru.jpg
Elyse Butler, Peru

Both Elyse Butler and Aevum Photo typify the best of the new voices in documentary photography today. In large part born from the development of digital technology and the power of the web, this group of young photographers bring a passion, depth and strong visual sensibility to their work

About Aevum:

We are witness to places foreign and familiar. Our cameras are our passage into the lives of people from all walks of life, used as a tool to find answers. Our images are visceral, and a visual search of expression. We believe photography is a privilege; one that allows us to give a voice to others and a chance to voice ourselves as well. We are drawn to each other by our unified belief in photography; its ability to express ideas and emotions, and promote change. Each of our passions are unique. Our purposes are unique. We have come together to expand the potential of the individual.

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