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Jack Picone April 4, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Thailand.
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AIDS patient at Wat Prabut Namphu, Lopburi, Thailand 2002

Jack Picone (b. 1958, Australia) has covered eight wars in the 1990s, some several times over, including Armenia, Yugoslavia, Somalia, Rwanda, Palestine, Iraq, Liberia, Sudan, Angola and Soviet Central Asia. He is credited as leading a new wave of Australian photographers that matured in the 1990s, a group who not only reported on day-to-day events but the deeper social issues at hand. His clients have included, German Geo, Stern, De Spiegel, The New Yorker, Time, Newsweek, L’Express, Granta, Colors Magazine and many others. Jack is a co-founder of Australia’s Reportage Festival and the founder of Communique documentary photography workshops along with Stephen Dupont. His work has been exhibited extensively in Europe, Australia and the USA. Jack is based in Bangkok and is a member of the collective South.

About the Photograph:

“This image was part of a larger body of work that looked at the AIDS epidemic in Thailand. The intention of this photograph was to give a voice to the HIV-infected people who face social ostracism, stigmatization and hardship in Thailand. In this specific photograph made at Wat Prabut Namphu (a Buddhist monastery/hospice for those dying of AIDS) a man reaches from under his human size mosquito and fly net for a glass of water. The hospice was a fairly bleak place which was challenged on many fronts and the care provided to people dying there, was rudimentary at best. The simple act of a man reaching for a glass of water is a very quiet moment but somehow when I look at this image it resonates loudly and pervades me and I am engulfed with a sense of melancholy and helplessness. For over a decade, I have been involved in photographing people and communities with AIDS as part of a London- based project called “Positive Lives.”

Ethan Knight July 30, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Thailand.
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Pattani, Southern Thailand 2012

Ethan Knight (b.1980, New Zealand) is a freelance documentary photographer, who currently divides his time between New York and South East Asia. In the past nine years, Ethan’s work has taken him to many different countries covering various humanitarian crises including the aftermath of the Pacific tsunami in Western Samoa, and the post civil war effects in Sierra Leone and Northern Sri Lanka. His images have appeared in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Sydney Morning Herald, Australian Geographic, New Zealand Geographic, Lonely Planet Images, and The Samoa Observer.

About the Photograph:

“This image was taken on assignment in Pattani, the deep south of Thailand. Since 2004, there have been over 4,000 fatalities due to the conflict between local Malay Muslims and the Thai authorities. In the three provinces of Pattani, Narathiwat and Yala, local Malay Muslims present a mirror image of national demographics, with ninety-five percent of the population identifying as Muslim and five percent as Buddhist compared to the national statistical average of 95 percent Buddhist and five percent Muslim. These statistics help us understand the ongoing conflict as a problem of identity and social cohesiveness. This particular image was shot in a segregated Malay-Muslim area outside a girls school. For me it conveys a sense of isolation of a closed world between these two ethic groups.”

Xavier Comas May 7, 2012

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Thailand.
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Narathiwat, a Province in Thailand’s Deep South 2011

Xavier Comas (b. 1970, Spain) graduated from the University of Barcelona. His work has been published and exhibited in Asia and Europe and seen in the Spain’s La Vanguardia newspaper edition, the Japanese art magazine ‘Quotation’, Courrier International and the Asia Literary Review. The Singapore Art Museum exhibited his installation ‘Pasajero’ as part of Transport Asian 2009. His work ‘Tokyo up, down’, a random photographic exploration in elevators, was exhibited at the Noorderlicht Photo Festival in 2011 and by the Museum of Estonian Architecture in Tallinn, Estonia. The House of the Raja : Splendor and Desolation in the Deep South of Thailand will be published by River Books in 2012. Xavier is based in Bangkok.

About the Photograph:

“On a journey to Narathiwat in Southern Thailand, I was taken by local inhabitants to a huge rambling wooden and brick structure, once the magnificent Palace of Tengku Samsuddin, the Raja of Legeh and one of the last Melayu rulers who paid tribute to Siam. I made use of the myth of the house as a vehicle to tell a story using the poetic language of magical realism. An atmosphere of dignified solitude inspired me to photograph a loose narrative of images tracing memory and identity across generations. Fiction and non-fiction overlap here, presenting the ordinary and mundane as extraordinary and fantastic. The House of the Raja looks behind the clouded veil of conflict to celebrate one of Thailandʼs most historic regions and tell its untold story.”

Corentin Fohlen November 10, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Thailand.
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Red Shirt Protesters, Bangkok 2010

Corentin Fohlen (b. 1981, France) studied illustration and comics in Belgium and shortly after discovered photography. Two years later, he began to shoot for  Wostok Press, covering political and social news in Paris. After working with the agencies Gamma and Abaca Press, he began working as a freelancer for Fedephoto, which gave him the freedom to cover both his own interests and major international events. Corentin has worked with Stern, The New York Times, Le Monde, Paris Match, Le Figaro, France Soir, Libération, l’Express, among others. His photographers have been exhibited at VISA pour l’Image and at the Festival Du Scoop in France. He also won the World Press Photo Second Prize Spot News for his work in Thailand.

About the Photograph:

“I choose this photo of the Red Shirts in Bangkok during the conflict with the Thaï government. The Red Shirts mostly are mostly the rural poor of Thailand. They entered the capital and set up camp in the business district of Silom. I missed the beginning weeks of conflict being in Haiti but later flew into Bangkok to cover the end of the story. After four days of fighting in the streets, the Thai army finally surrendered. On 19 May, after troops in armored cars had stormed barricades around the demonstrators’ encampment the Red Shirt leaders ordered their supporters to end the protest. Even after the call to surrender, some demonstrators said they would continue to fight. By the time the unrest finally died down at the end of May, over 80 people had been killed and some 2,000 injured.”

Brent Lewin August 2, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Thailand.
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Bangkok  2009

Brent Lewin (b. 1979, Canada) is a self-taught photographer currently residing in Toronto and Bangkok. His work has largely focused on the plight of the Asian elephant and their caregivers in Thailand. Brent’s work has been awarded by Pictures of the Year, Px3, the International Photography Awards and American Photo. His work has appeared in publications such as National Geographic, New York Times Lens Blog, Discovery Channel Magazine and Geo. He was recently selected as one of the photographers for the PDN 30 in 2010. Brent is a contributing photographer with Redux Pictures.

About the Photograph:

“I began photographing Bangkok’s street elephants and their caretakers in 2007. Pictured is a mahout washing her pet elephant Boopae at their temporary camp site. For me, watching the mahout’s ritual washing of their elephants is a touching demonstration of the deep bond shared between human and elephant. A bond that stretches back several hundred years among the Kui. The Kui, translating to ‘the people’, are an ethnic minority in Thailand that have traditionally made their living from capturing wild elephants and have disdained conventional work. The Kui are concentrated in a collection of villages in Surin province. Village leadership and administration are closely associated with the elephant shaman, and the local economy to the elephant. The villages have long been known for their role in capturing wild elephants to be sold onward for war or heavy labor. The Kui caught their last elephant in Thailand in 1970 and have been keeping them as pets ever since.”

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