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Stefano De Luigi July 15, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China, Tibet.
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Qinghai Province, China 2009

Stefano De Luigi (b. 1964, Italy) is a contributor to international magazines including Stern, Paris Match, Le Monde Magazine, Newsweek and The New Yorker. His long term projects include “Pornoland” (winner of the Marco Bastianelli Prize in 2005) and “Blanco,” visions of blindness, published by Trolley in 2010. Blanco has been produced with support from World Health Organization, Vision 2020 and the 2007 W.E. Smith Fellowship. In 2006, he started a new project called “Cinema Mundi,” which was transformed into a seven minute short film that screened at the Locarno International Film Festival. Stefano has won the World Press Photo three times in different categories (1998, 2007, 2009), the Moving Walls of Soros Foundation in 2009 and Days Japan International Photojournalism Award 2010, Getty Grant for editorial photography 2010. Since 2008 is represented by VII/Network.

About the Photograph:

“This picture was was taken on the road along Koko Nor lake known in China as Qinghai Hu in the Qinghai Province. I was traveling from Bejing to Lhasa on a reportage about the ‘sky train’ and wanted to stop in Xining, the town that is the door to the Tibetan Plateau. This lake is considered sacred by Tibetans and is the largest lake without a river outlet in central Asia. It’s 3,200 meter above sea level and very cold and windy. When I saw this car on top of the pole I was quite amused that in a place like this somebody could have an idea to advertise his own business in a such strange way. My interpreter explained that the car was put as a warning. There are traces of false blood all around the car to alert drivers of the many car accidents that occur on the highway.”

Shinya Arimoto June 15, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Tibet.
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From the Series “Why Now Tibet”, 2009

Shinya Arimoto ( b. 1971, Japan) graduated from Osaka School of Visual Arts 1994. Since then Shinya has photographed in India, Nepal and Tibet where he spent more than 18 months. In 1998, he won the 35th Taiyo award for his photography book Portrait of Tibet. He opened the Totem Pole Gallery in Shinjuku, Tokyo in 2008. Shinya has published Portrait of Tibet (Visual Arts, 1999) and ariphoto selection vol. 1 (Totem Pole Gallery, 2010). His work has been published in Asahi Camera and Kaze no Tabibito, among others. Shinya also teaches at various photography schools including the Tokyo Visual Arts Center.

About the Photograph:

“This image was taken in the Tibet Autonomous Region of  Sichuan Province. Outside the restaurant, this nomadic father and son in tribal robes were peeking at a Tibetan language TV show. The robe represents a sense of ethnic identity, especially strong during youth. Tibetans in this small town in the middle of vast grasslands have made their living trading with other nomads for many years. I revisited this town in the summer of 2009 for the first time in 10 years. Although Tibet is often called a hidden land, significant economic development in China during the past 10 years has brought changes to the lives of many. I saw few horses in the grasslands and instead watched many nomadic Tibetans speeding by on motorcycles. I saw people with cell phones walking through the renovated town, which showed no signs of my previous visit. However, there are traditions that the people have kept by fighting new trends. I wanted to witness what they had gained, what they lost, and to learn about my own changes over the past 10 years.”

Editors Note: Thanks to Kayo Lackey for translating the bio and interview with Shinya.

Ryan Gauvin April 7, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Tibet.
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Tibetan youth in Lhasa, 2008

Ryan Gauvin (b. 1983, Canada) is a documentary photographer based in Vancouver.  He holds a BA in Geography from Simon Fraser University, and an MFA in Documentary Media from Ryerson University.  Ryan also attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2009.  In the past he has partnered with the International Campaign for Tibet, and his work has been published internationally.  Ryan was recently recognized at the 2009 New York Photo Awards and 2009 PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris for his work in Tibet.  He has also completed projects on golf course greens keepers in Canada and is currently in the research stage of a documentary photography project on the use of depleted uranium warheads in the Balkans. Ryan shoots with Kodak Tri-X film for all of his personal work

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken in a common room adjoining a pool hall on the outskirts of Lhasa in November 2008.  China’s PLA soldiers in riot gear were constantly pacing up and down the alley just outside, the remnants of the popular uprising and subsequent crackdown earlier in the year.  In general, the Tibetans I met in Lhasa didn’t want to speak about these troubled times for fear of being overheard.  Only here, in the perceived safety of this small room did conversation begin to open up: about the discontent, the uprising, the unemployment, living under Chinese occupation, escaping to India, and any other number of things that were not to be spoken about in public.  Even after I returned home and began seeking publication for my work, most people were less interested in these stories of Tibetan reality than with stereotypical photographs of monks and mountains.”

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Christian Keenan September 1, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China, Tibet.
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Christian Keenan (b. 1973, England). ” After leaving school I joined the British Army for several years. It gave me the travel bug and an interest in the world around me. After leaving the army I spent  a few years figuring out what to do with myself.  A family member gave me a camera and once I developed my first film I was hooked. I suppose the only thing that really interested me with regards  to photography was the ability to tell a story. So after a while of teaching myself how to use a camera I got a job with a local paper for a few years after which I moved to Hong Kong and spent several years documenting China. During this time I won a world press photo award for my work on the Uighurs of Kashgar as well as a few other awards. I am currently working out of Jersey, Channel Islands.

About The Photograph:

“I wanted to document the old Tibet and not Tibet as we know it today, I had heard about this place called The Labrang Monastery in Xiahe and how it was a bit off the beaten track and not frequented by hoards of tourists. The Monastery was a delight to document and it seemed as though I was the only foreigner there, which was great as it opened so many doors. Pictured here are a Tibetan family preparing to offer scarves during their pilgrimage to the Monastery. Many Tibetan families travel for days to visit the Monastery.”

8.8.88- 8.8.08: Twenty Years On August 8, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burma, China, Tibet.
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Cyclone Nargis , Burma, 2008

Editors note: Today is both the anniversary of 8.8.88 as well as 8.8.08, the opening of the Beijing Olympics. Twenty years ago the Burma military junta killed tens of thousands of innocent Burmese on the streets of Rangoon. Unfortunately we are not in a position to name the photographer for the reasons above.

About the Photograph:

“Hhaing The Yu, 29, holds his face in his hand as rain falls on the decimated remains of his home in the Swhe Pyi Tha township, near Myanmar’s capital of Yangon (Rangoon), on Sunday, May 11th, 2008.  Cyclone Nargis struck southern Myanmar a week ago leaving millions homeless and has claimed up to 100,000 lives.  Experts have warned that Myanmar now runs the risk of a public health crisis that could take an even greater toll, as the country’s military government has been slow to allow in international aid.


Tibetan Monks. Kathmandu, Nepal

Brian Sokol was born in the late 1970′s in the American Midwest where he grew-up pouring over back issues of National Geographic.  At university he studied writing and education before heading overseas.  After being awarded a small grant from the University of Wisconsin, Brian purchased his first camera and 100 rolls of slide film a few days before heading to Nepal for a year that elapsed into a decade.  In July 2008 Brian moved from Kathmandu to New Delhi, India in to better cover South and Southeast Asia.  He work appears regularly in publications including The New York Times, Time, Stern, l’Espresso and Der Spiegel.  He is the recipient of National Geographic Magazine’s 2007 Eddie Adams grant and was recognized as one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers to Watch in 2008.

About the Photograph:

A Tibetan monk, rosary beads hanging from his hand, covers his face while sitting in solidarity during a hunger strike at a Tibetan refugee camp in Kathmandu, Nepal on 18 March 2008.  Eleven hunger strikers have been fasting in the Nepalese capital since 11 p.m. on 16 March in protest against conditions in Tibet.

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