jump to navigation

Lottie Hedley February 24, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Hilty family in Maine over the course of the four seasons in 2011/2012

Lottie Hedley (b. 1979, New Zealand) began her photographic journey in 2010 in Maine after seven years as a corporate lawyer working in New Zealand, the UK and Russia. Lottie attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2011, was selected for Center’s review Santa Fe in 2012 and has had her work included in the Catherine Edelman Gallery’s “Ctrl+P” exhibition series for emerging photographers. She is currently based in New Zealand where in addition to freelancing she edits a photography magazine called PRO Photographer.

About the Photograph:

“I come from farming stock in New Zealand and have a keen interest in how we look after the land and the next generation of farmers. While I was photographing another local organic potato farming family the farmer, Jim, had mentioned how he was inspired in some of his practices by the local Amish farmers. After an introduction and some letter writing and meeting with the Hilty family in person they decided I could come and stay with them and photograph their practices as it relates to sustainable living.

Life in the Hilty household works in circles. Food at meals is passed around the table in a clockwise circle; while questions regarding the morning’s bible reading come around the table in an anti-clockwise direction. The seasons impress their own circular influence on the family’s market gardening business and their method of farming cycles the soil through a process that ensures the soil is enriched rather than stripped. Perhaps most importantly, the family’s philosophy on farming for the future generations is according to an over-arching cycle. Their philosophy is to work with the land instead of against it. They don’t want their children to have to deal with problems they’ve created by farming the land to excess.

This picture is a reminder to me that there are little things that we can do to live more sustainably. Even in my own family we would always pick peaches and mum would preserve them. If this project lead to one person looking at their own lifestyle and seeing what they could plant in their own backyard, what they could preserve when produce is in abundance or just what they are doing in general to make things better for the next generation, whether that relates to food and the land or otherwise, the project will have been successful.”

Linda Forsell January 20, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Rockaway, New York 2012

Linda Forsell (b.1982, Sweden) is based in New York. Her project Cause of Death (with Kerstin Weig and Karin Alfredsson) documenting violence against women was awarded special recognition in the Swedish Picture of the Year. Life’s a blast, from Israel and Palestine, became a book in 2012, at the same time as it was exhibited in Stockholm, Sweden. The series was one of the finalists of Magnum Expression Award in 2010 and was shown at the Noorderlicht photo festival in 2009. Her work has been published in The New Yorker, la Repubblica and most major Scandinavian publications. Linda has received recognition from the Swedish Arts Foundation, the Lead Awards, Flash Magenta Award and a nomination in Magnum Emergency Fund. She is a member of Kontinent and IBL photo agencies.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is from the small community Roxbury on the Rockaway Peninsula just one day after hurricane Sandy hit. The area was one of the worst hit regions and every single house had water flooding their basements and reaching above the first floor. Many were hit even worse, their homes being swept away by the water that rose and crossed over the entire peninsula from the Atlantic side to the bay side. The rare few who defied the evacuation order during the storm tell stories of swimming or surfing from their homes to the nearest safe spot.

Ted Feimer is part of the heart of Roxbury. On this day, he returned for the first time to see the devastation after the hurricane with his own eyes. There was a pressing air of sadness and uncertainty about the future lying like a blanket over the entire neighborhood. Ted did his best to turn his sadness into energy and was determined to fight for the reconstruction of his home. He walked around trying to begin by consoling his friends. In this picture he met one of his neighbors wandering across the beach trying to grasp the magnitude of what happened and without saying a word they just hugged.”

Erin Brethauer January 13, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Ginny and Claxton, from the series Autism Camp. Black Mountain, North Carolina 2012

Erin Brethauer (b. 1983, United States) is a staff photographer turned multimedia editor at the Asheville Citizen-Times, a daily newspaper in North Carolina where she has been working since 2007. Originally from Milwaukee, WI, she graduated in 2005 with an English degree from Marquette University and photography minor from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design.  Since then she has interned with the Eau Claire Leader-Telegram (WI), The Morning News (SC), the Milwaukee Art Museum and has worked with the Associated Press. She was the president of the North Carolina Press Photographers Association from 2011 until February of 2013. Her personal project about Camp Lakey Gap, a camp for people with autism, has been awarded by the Magenta Foundation, FotoVisura, the North Carolina Press Photographers Association and the Asheville Area Arts Council.

About the Photograph:

“Camp Lakey Gap is a residential summer camp for people with autism located in Western North Carolina. I first went there for a newspaper assignment in 2008 and have returned nearly every summer to document the people and try to visualize the different ways these people communicate. When I learned that the Autism Society of North Carolina estimates that 1 out of 88 children born today have some form of Autism Spectrum Disorder, I thought the story was especially relevant. In North Carolina they think the average is more like 1 out of 70 children.”

“This is an image of Ginny sharing a moment with her camper Claxton. She’s trying to coax him out of the pool at the end of the day. I think this picture helps challenge the perception that people with autism don’t make emotional connections with people. Ginny had a great fondness for Claxton and was very perceptive to the ways he communicated with her through facial and body language. They grew very close over their week together, forming a deep bond that was mostly nonverbal. It’s often the fleeting moments like this that the counselors cherish. Here they’re looking into each others eyes which, for Claxton, was a sign of trust.”

Julia Cybularz December 16, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Christmas, Philadelphia, 2012

Julia Cybularz (b. 1978, United States) earned her MFA from The School of Visual Arts and holds a B.S. in Photography from Drexel University. Her photography and video work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally. In 2007, Julia was the recipient of an Aaron Siskind Memorial grant as well as The School of Visual Arts’ alumni grant. Julia studied under notable photographers Mary Ellen Mark, Andrew Moore and Tina Barney. Her work has been featured in American Photo, on the HBO series “How to Make it in America”, PDN and on Lens Culture. Most recently, she has been selected as a finalist for the Hasselblad Masters, Fotovisura grant, Critical Mass competition and Magenta Flash Forward. She was also presented with the Griffin Award for her series “Breaking the Girl”.

About the Photography:

“This photograph is part of an on-going series titled “The Mathematician” which focuses on my cousin Slawek, a Polish émigré, who is developmentally delayed and has lived with schizophrenia for over twenty years. I made this image of Slawek playing monopoly with his niece during the Christmas holidays. Games, especially children’s games, that involve some form of math, are one of Slawek’s favorite activities and obsessions. The use of photography in this series explores how relationships can be challenged and strengthened through everyday dealings with this sickness. Instead of being singularly explanative, the photographs provide glimpses and fragments, which add up to a collective narrative. One of the focal points of the project is to provide a portrait of Slawek and his relationship to his closely knit family. Children play an important role in Slawek’s life. Children are his playmates and closest confidants. They go on incredible journeys together, sometimes real and other times imagined.”

Melissa Golden November 28, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Saudi Arabia Cultural Mission Graduation Ceremony, United States 2012

Melissa Golden (b.1984, USA) is a Washington, D.C. based editorial photographer. She enjoyed a nomadic childhood courtesy of the U.S. Military and her photography is directly influenced by her stints on both American coasts, the Deep South, and the Middle East. After graduating from the University of Georgia with degrees in International Relations and Journalism, she transitioned from newspapers to the wires to the magazine work she does today. Melissa’s photography has been recognized by American Photography 29, the White House News Photographer’s Association, and the Eddie Adams Workshop and has been shown at exhibitions in DC, LA, Stockholm and Cape Town. She is a contributing photographer with Redux Pictures and her clients include Parade, Fast Company, Bloomberg Businessweek, ESPN Magazine, Esquire and Marie Claire among others.

About the Photograph:

“The Wall Street Journal called me up to document a graduation ceremony at National Harbor outside Washington, D.C. for a story about Saudi nationals seeking higher education in the United States. The ceremony was sponsored by the Saudi government, as was the university bill for every single one of the students there. They were the all part of a program that subsidized the foreign education of the country’s best and brightest in an effort to groom them for leadership roles both in Saudi Arabia and globally. The enrollment of Saudi students at U.S. institutions has jumped dramatically since a precipitous falloff after 9-11 when tough restrictions were enacted.”

“As a child, I lived in Bahrain for two years and while I haven’t been back, shooting this ceremony was a bit of a nostalgic sensory overload experience for me. I gravitated toward the women in particular during the day for a few reasons. I found them visually distinctive, in that even though both male and female graduates wore the same cap and gown uniform that day, the women (with a single exception I noticed immediately) remained observant to various degrees with hijabs and veils. I also was surprised to see the sheer number of female graduates in attendance, a far larger contingent than I had expected. This photo was shot prior to the ceremony as the graduates began to stream in and take their seats, separated by gender, of course. The Saudi greens versus the pinks of lipsticks on bare faces, a scarf, and the one woman’s cell phone cover were particularly striking to me. There were still women sporting veils though and the image strikes me as a gentle collision of old world and new world values.”

Eric Kruszewski November 18, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Rodeo in Pendleton, Oregon 2011

Eric Kruszewski (b. 1978, USA) is a self-taught photographer based in Baltimore, Maryland. His initial education was through engineering school, thus leading to employment dismantling chemical weaponry, securing biological agents and processing nuclear waste. But business trips to sensory-overloaded Central Asia rattled his tech foundation and uncovered a passion for photography. After a 10-year stint in engineering, Eric resigned (March 2012) to practice his photography full-time. Now having traveled to 37 countries, Eric documents social, economic and cultural issues both abroad and in his backyard. His work has been published by organizations such as National Geographic (online), The Wall Street Journal and ABC News. Eric is an executive board member and mentor with the Young Photographer’s Alliance. His work is represented by National Geographic Creative.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was made while exploring American Rodeo over a two-year period. In the summer of 2011, while driving across the country from Maryland to Washington, I discovered and witnessed my first rodeo in a small Montana town. Instantly, I was intrigued with the sport, and its surrounding culture and pageantry. Some cowboys at this first rodeo told me how the Pendleton Round-Up (held in Pendleton, Oregon) was the top event in the Pacific Northwest. So I went, a city slicker blazing with my Canon double barrels, and attended the Round-Up’s 100-year anniversary. This image, captured from outside the main arena, shows the staircase to the Directors’ Room – a gathering space for the event’s VIP. The stadium’s facade is plastered with signage that preserves past rodeo winners. At the bottom of the staircase, a security guard looks longingly, or perhaps with concern, at the group spilling out of the room onto the staircase. The cowboy in the foreground is a spectator.”

Ilona Szwarc October 31, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


From the “American Girl’s” project. Jenna Groveland, Massachusetts 2012

Ilona Szwarc (b.1984 Poland) has had a solo exhibition at Claude Samuel gallery in Paris and Maison de la Photographie in Lille, France. She has exhibited in  group shows internationally in London, Bilbao and New York. Her work has been featured in publications worldwide including The New York Times Magazine, TIME, The New Yorker, The UK Sunday Times Magazine, The Telegraph Magazine, Surface China, PDN. Ilona won a World Press Photo award in 2013 for the Observed Portraits category, 3rd Prize; PDN 2012 Annual in the Personal Category and has been awarded Grand Prize in the Fine Art category of the PDNedu 2013 contest. She has been selected for American Photography 28 and 29. Her project “American Girls” has received worldwide recognition, having been highlighted in The New York Times Lens Blog, MSNBC Today.com and The Huffington Post, among others.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph of Jenna and her horse Peter Pan was taken on her farm in Groveland, Massachussets. Jenna lived on a farm with sixty horses. Her parents raise horses and teach horseback riding classes. She owned several dolls and several horses for their dolls. Here she is portrayed with her look-alike doll, Kirstyn, who just like Jenna, is riding a miniature horse. The image is a part of American Girls, a series of large format portraits of girls in the United States who own customizable, mini-me dolls. American Girl dolls were conceived to be anti-Barbie toys, modeled after the body of a nine-year-old. Each doll can be customized to look exactly like its owner. With a wide variety of miniature accessories, they are perhaps the most luxurious toys ever invented. They play a crucial role for girls when they are forming their identities. Jenna talked about how these dolls allow her to fully embrace her personality. She says: I can be myself.”

Andrew Renneisen October 24, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


From the project “Violent Times.”  Alexander Kamara funeral. Wilmington, Del. 2012

Andrew Renneisen (b. 1992, USA) is currently enrolled at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. He is currently an intern at the Philadelphia Inquirer, and has previously worked at The Press of Atlantic City in Atlantic City, NJ and at The News Journal in Wilmington, DE. He was a recipient of the 2013 Alexia Foundation Award of Excellence for his work on Violence in the United States, and is a member of the Eddie Adams Class of XXVI. He has also received awards from the NPPA and the S.I. Newhouse School. His work has been published in The Washington Post, Denver Post, The Philadelphia Inquirer and other publications.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of my story on violence in the United States that depicts the harsh realities of violent conflict and it’s impact on local communities. It was made at the funeral of Alex Kamara, a promising 16 year old student and athlete. Alex was shot in the face by a stray bullet during a soccer tournament in Wilmington, Delaware, on a Sunday afternoon in July of 2012. The bullet was meant for the tournament’s organizer, who was going to testify in court after witnessing a murder. (He was also killed in the shooting.) In this frame, Alex’s brother, Jonathan, is carrying his brother’s casket to be moved to his final resting place. Jonathan was helped by Alex’s friends and teammates, some wearing their soccer jerseys in honor of Alex. This funeral was actually an assignment for the News Journal. The day I came to photograph was the first time I had met the Kamara family. I was surprised on how welcoming they were to have me at Alex’s funeral. I think it pushed me even harder to try to convey, in one frame, such a tragic event in this family’s life.”

Uliana Bazar September 30, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Ukrainian Church during the Baptism ceremony. Brighton Beach, Brooklyn 2012

Uliana Bazar (b.1986, Ukraine) recently graduated from the Corcoran College of Art and Design with a Masters in New Media Photojournalism. While in school Uliana completed a 6-month internship with the National Geographic Book Division and now works with them regularly as a freelance photo editor. Her work has been published by National Geographic Books, The Washington Post, NPR, Hemispheres & GO magazines, and exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. In 2013, she was recognized by both FotoDC and the Magenta Foundation. She is based in Washington, DC.

About the Photograph:

“This photo was taken while I was working on my Masters thesis at the Corcoran College of Art and Design. It’s part of a series for which I spent about one year, on and off, documenting the Little Odessa community in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. The Little Odessa neighborhood has a population consisting primarily of Russian, Ukrainian, and Eastern-European immigrants. Because I am originally from Ukraine I was able to get very intimate access to this community. Eventually I was accepted as family, and my subjects and I could relate to each other on a very personal level.”

“While working on this project I photographed numerous social and religious events for the community. I was always welcomed and my photography was warmly embraced. This particular image was made during a baptism ceremony in a Ukrainian Orthodox church. At the moment I made the image the baptism was taking place and these two boys were standing awkwardly and slightly bored in the back of the chapel. In Little Odessa there are many boys about this age who are eager to serve in their church, much to their parent’s pleasure. These two, however, seemed to mirror my own slightly awkward feelings I was experiencing as I watched this special ceremony unfold. It’s interesting how, after almost five years away from Ukraine, my very own culture starts to feel exotic and far away.”

Amanda Berg September 16, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


From a project on Teen Binge Drinking, Henrietta, NY 2010

Amanda Berg (b. 1989, United States) is a documentarian based in North Carolina. She graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a BFA in Photojournalism and is currently pursuing an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke University. She spent seven months interning at the Fayetteville Observer before going back to school. Her work has been recognized by the Alexia Foundation, Eddie Adams Workshop, Pingyao International Photography Festival, North Carolina Press Association, featured in TIME Online and exhibited at 25 CPW Gallery. Her current projects explore women’s football, the crossroads of military and civilian life and her own familial memory.

About the Photograph:

“This picture is from a project I began during my junior year of college about the gender dynamics of undergraduate binge drinking. The series is meant to question gender-neutral drinking norms by taking into consideration recent studies that have shown an increase in female drinking and higher rates of the negative side effects associated. I took this particular picture early on in the project at a St Patrick’s Day Party my roommates held at our apartment. It was one of the first times I can remember watching a moment unfold behind my camera, waiting for the women’s dancing legs to reveal all three of the men’s faces. I waited so long I ran out of space on my memory card, snuck away to my bedroom to replace it and came back to continue photographing the scene.”

Maddie McGarvey August 26, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
Tags: ,
comments closed


From story about Lyme Disease, Vermont 2013

Maddie McGarvey (b. 1990, United States) graduated from Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication with a degree in photojournalism in 2012. Maddie has interned for the San Francisco Chronicle and was a staff photographer at the Burlington Free Press in Vermont until August of 2013. She is now a freelance photographer based in Columbus, Ohio. Maddie was the recipient of the LUCEO Student Project Award and the James R. Gordon Ohio Understanding Award in 2011. She has been recognized by College Photographer of the Year, Hearst, and was runner-up Ohio Student Photographer of the Year in 2011. She was nominated for the Joop Swart Master Class in 2013 and attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2011. She has been published in Once Magazine, AARP Bulletin, The Washington Post, CNN.com, Education Week, USA Today and The Today Show.

About the Photograph:

“This is a photo of Greg Soll, a vegetable farmer in Vermont who was afflicted with Lyme Disease. One tick bite seriously affected the way he lived and worked for a long time. Farmers are used to putting in 14-18 hour days and suddenly he was constantly exhausted and couldn’t even use his right arm. He had to fight with doctors to even give him a Lyme test and unfortunately this has become a norm. More and more farmers are contracting Lyme disease and less doctors will diagnose and treat it. I spent the day with Greg while he farmed. While things are mostly back to normal for him, he still gets tired easily and has to take breaks often. But because farming is his way of sustaining himself and making a living, he fights through the pain and exhaustion to get his work done.”

Annie Flanagan August 8, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Purple Orchid Lady. Monroe, New York 2012

Annie Flanagan (b. 1986, United States)  graduated from Ohio University’s Visual Communication program in 2009, Annie took to exploring the world around her and documenting it along the way. Her work has been recognized by CPOY (Silver, Spot News), The Alexia Foundation for World Peace and Cultural Understanding Student Grant (Award of Excellence). This past July she began graduate school at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

About the Photograph:

“I met Sam last summer at the racetrack in Brewerton, NY. He was in the pit with his family, racing against his son, grandsons and great-granddaughter. ‘I do it because I love the speed,’ he told me, ‘Speed has been my life since I was little.’ Sam drove his first car at seven and began racing when he was 18. Now at 83 he is still racing. That summer he was recovering from the loss of his wife Doris, who passed away that December. Her favorite color was purple, so most things in his home have tints of purple to them. She named his race car the The Purple Orchid Lady, decorating his car with a painting of a pin-up girl. On this afternoon, Sam had just finished spending a day fixing up his car with his son Billy. He came out of the garage and sat down to drink coffee and watch the storm roll in.”

Alan Chin July 4, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Gun show, Lima, Ohio 2012

Alan Chin (b. 1970, United States) was raised in New York City’s Chinatown. Since 1996, he has worked in China, the former Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, and many other places in the Middle East and Central Asia. Alan has explored the South, following the historic trail of the civil rights movement and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, covered the 2008 presidential campaign, and the Occupy Wall Street movement. He is a contributing photographer to Newsweek and The New York Times, and member of Facing Change: Documenting America (FCDA), and an editor at Newsmotion.org.

About the Photograph:

“On a typical weekend in January, 400 women about to get married went to the Lima Bride fashion show and wedding cornucopia at the downtown Veterans Memorial Convention Center. Sponsored by the local newspaper, The Lima News, caterers, dressmakers, photographers, venues, and limousine companies rented booths and hawked their services. Marriage seems to be a recession proof industry. At the Allen County Fairgrounds a few miles away, a parallel male universe of a gun show was happening at the same time. Terry Morgan, the president of the Tri-State Gun Collectors, said, ‘Guns sales are up 30% over the last two years, with an exploding increase in applications for concealed-carry permits. There’s fear of the government.’ Morgan supports castle laws which give wide latitude to the use of deadly force in the home without any need to retreat even when safe.”

Adrian Fussell June 17, 2013

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


JROTC Army Recruits. Louisville, Kentucky 2012

Adrian Fussell (b.1989, USA) is a Panamanian-American photographer based in New York City. He grew up in Switzerland, Zimbabwe, and Guatemala, following his parents and their work as American diplomats, before returning to the U.S. at age 16. While attending New York University for degrees in journalism and political science, Adrian worked as a writer and photographer for the Village Voice and for the Black AIDS Institute. In 2012 he studied photojournalism at the International Center of Photography, where he documented the world of a high school JROTC program in Queens, NY. That same year he was the recipient of the ICP George & Joyce Moss Scholarship, the Magnum Foundation: Emergency Fund Fellowship, and the Ian Parry Scholarship. He attended Eddie Adams Workshop XXV, and currently shoots for the Wall Street Journal and for Getty Images. He is also recognized on the Emerging Talent roster at Getty Images, Reportage section.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is one from a series titled My Name is Victory, on JROTC Army programs in public high schools in America. The subjects are drill team cadets from Francis Lewis High School, and they’re pictured training in a parking lot outside of their hotel in Louisville, KY. The team, called the Patriot Guard, was seeking it’s third consecutive national championship in 2012, but they placed second after a cadet dropped his rifle during the performance. In the foreground is cadet Jenny Chen, age 17 when this photo was taken, who was a squad leader and is giving the command for her cadets to march. Drill team duty requires hours of weapons handling practice and marching six days a week. The cadets spin and throw to each other their dummy Springfield 1903 rifles, World War 1 era weapons that weigh roughly nine pounds and are kept by the Francis Lewis JROTC officers in a locked closet on the school campus, located in Fresh Meadows, Queens, NYC.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,266 other followers