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Bryan Derballa October 31, 2011

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Artist Chili Moon Town, New York 2009

Bryan Derballa (b. 1982, USA) is a Brooklyn-based documentary photographer. He studied English at the University of California in Berkeley before taking up photography. In 2006 he started Lovebryan, a photo blog site featuring a community of friends. Together many of the Lovebryan contributors have pushed each other to become working photojournalists, filmmakers or acclaimed fine art photographers.  Bryan has used the site as an outlet for personal projects and assignments in Israel, Colombia, Venezuela, Russia, New Zealand and most recently Brazil. Bryan has photographed for clients including The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, The FADER, AARP, The Daily, Wired.com, Juxtapoz, Nike, Adidas, and Huck Magazine.

About the Photograph:

“A ragtag conglomeration of marching bands filled the lobby of a building in midtown Manhattan just before the beginning of a performance piece called “City of Dreams” by the artists Chili Moon Town. The were about to pile into a decorated double-decker bus banging  and blowing their instruments on a drive down Broadway. It was a grand spectacle for all of New York City to see. But for me, this photo of Kate Riegle van West was far more interesting. It was the quiet moment before the cacophony that no one really noticed. She seemed so sincere- playing to herself while all the others were pacing around and joking with one another. A lot of things happened in front of my camera that day, but nothing felt so subtly emotive. When it comes down to it, that’s always my favorite feeling to photograph.”

Brandon Thibodeaux October 10, 2011

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Shishmaref, Alaska 2006

Brandon Thibodeaux (b. 1981, United States) is a member of the New York based photography collective, MJR. Following his university studies in photojournalism and international development he now resides in Dallas, Texas, where he regularly contributes to the Financial Times Weekend Magazine, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal, among others. He is a member of the Getty Reportage 2009-10 Emerging Talent, and the Eddie Adams XIX alumnus.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from my first real project endeavor during my senior year of college.  In August 2006 I traveled 120 miles northwest of Nome, Alaska, landing in the small island village of Shishmaref.  Its roughly 550 Inupiaq residents faced a looming migration due to the severe erosion plaguing the tiny island.  Climate change was keeping protective sea ice from forming around its shoreline leaving its brittle sand and permafrost foundation vulnerable against harsh winter storms. I was taken aback by the elements of pop culture that I found, like 2 Pac posters, and video game consoles, intertwined with the community’s more traditional ways of life.  Shortly after this image was taken we feasted on caribou steaks and Akutaq – otherwise known as Eskimo ice cream made from whipped caribou fat and seal oil, mixed with fresh picked salmon berries.”

Brian Widdis October 3, 2011

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Grand Rapids, Michigan 2006

Brian Widdis (b. 1969, USA) began his professional work in 1995 doing commercial photography in Lansing and Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2001, he relocated to Detroit and began doing editorial work. In 2009, Brian photographed the ritual of collecting the daily mail as part of the series ‘Delivery’. Since 2007, he has been photographing his home life and his experience being a dad for a project titled ‘The Home Front’. Brian is also working with fellow Detroit photographer Romain Blanquart about the city of Detroit called ‘Can’t Forget the Motor City’. His work has been published in Rolling Stone, Time, The Guardian, The New York Times, Education Week and NPR. Brian lives with his family in Detroit.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph is part of my project – ‘The Passion of St. James’. In 2006, my elementary school in Grand Rapids, Michigan closed. Before they closed, I made a final visit to see how my memory compared to its last days as a Catholic grade school. Squinting through the viewfinder, I was reassured by things familiar to me – unchanged classrooms and the sunken gymnasium with the same 1970‘s blue and gold carpet that I remembered. Also reassuring was the unfamiliar – a new media center with computers and new textbooks told of a school changing, as of course they must. St. James was the site of many milestones for me – my first crush and my first Communion. My personal history at the school was confirmed by a library book – a biography of baseball player Roberto Clemente that I remember checking out, still bore the deliberate cursive ‘Brian W.’ some 30 years later.”

Brad Vest September 19, 2011

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From the series “The Best We Can”, Amesville, Ohio 2010

Brad Vest (b. 1985, USA) became interested in photography while souping film in the basement of his dormitory attending the University of Illinois. At the time he was completing a Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences degree. After graduating in 2008 he moved on to work at newspapers in Seattle, Kansas, and Milwaukee focusing on daily storytelling and exploring longer term, narrative stories. In 2009 following his passion to continue long-term documentary storytelling he moved to Ohio University. In 2010, he attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and was a winner in the Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward 2011. He was also featured during the LOOK3 SHOTS presentation of 2011. His work has also been recognized by the College Photographer of the Year competition and the NPPA Best of Photography competition.

 About the Photograph:

“After raising two children, Kim Wilson represents the changing role of grandparents in southeast Ohio. After Kim’s daughter’s drug related custody forfeiture of her two children, Jenna and Ayden, Kim and her husband, Darren, took the kids into their home and have found themselves as parents the second time around. This photo was taken during one of the many days that I spent with the Wilson family while documenting families affected by the ongoing prescription drug epidemic within Appalachia. Kim is helping Ayden and Jenna brush their teeth before sending Jenna off to school. The family doesn’t have running water to their bathroom sink so they use their kitchen for most of their running water needs. Kim and Darren’s decision to raise their grandkids has them confronting the challenges of raising young children while negotiating the issues around aging and their independence.”

Pete Marovich September 12, 2011

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Mennonite family in Virginia, 2008

Pete Marovich (b. 1961, USA) has been a photojournalist for 24 years working for newspapers, wire services and magazines. From 1986 until 1999, Pete worked as a contract photographer for major golf publications while covering the professional golf tours. He was named the 2008 NPPA Region 3 Photographer of the year as well as runner-up in 2006 and 2009. Images from his coverage of the 2009 Presidential Inauguration were included in the Official Inaugural Book as well as the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Museum of American History. He is currently the Washington D.C. Bureau Chief for ZUMA Press covering the White House and Capitol Hill. His photography has appeared in Time Magazine, Newsweek, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, Mother Jones, Sports Illustrated, The Huffington Post, Politico, Bloomberg and others.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is from a project on an Old Order Mennonite family in Virginia. I had been working for the newspaper in Harrisonburg and there is a large Mennonite community in the surrounding county. The project was not easy to photograph since Old Order Mennonites are similar to the Amish in that they do not like to be photographed. I was introduced to this family by a family friend who had grown up knowing the family. Permission to visit them and “observe” their way of life was granted by the patriarch of the family with the understanding that they would not pose for any images. I spent about eight months making visits to the family while getting to know them, gaining their trust and making the occasional image. This particular photograph was made during a community gathering at a nearby farm. Jesse, the youngest of the children, was hanging out with the men.”

Julie Glassberg August 17, 2011

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Marissa and Mikey @ the Chicken Hut, Brooklyn 2009

Julie Glassberg (b. 1984, France) studied graphic design for four years and later decided to make her passion for photography become her life. Her interests are primarily based on the diversity of world cultures, subcultures, underground scenes as well as misfits of society, the weak, the feared, the unaccepted. Photography is like a passport to enter worlds that she would never be able to see otherwise. Julie is currently working in New York City on projects as well as freelancing for clients such as The New York Times. She is the recipient for the LUCIE Scholarship Emerging Grant (2010), a Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography (2010), a 2011 POYi award of excellence, and was selected by PhotoEspana Descubrimiento 2011.

About the Photograph:

“This photo comes from a long term project called Bike Kill, about the tall bike subculture in Brooklyn. A lot of the images are chaotic. It’s a bit of a destructive, crazy environment. Good crazy though. This community is full of artists, self taught kids, and DIY experiments. I like the quiet moment captured while everyone was going crazy, alcohol flowing and music playing loud. At some point Mikey pulled me out of the crowd. He took me to a huge elevator and locked the door. There were five of us and Chacha the dog. Coming from the chaotic party, this became a very quiet, intimate moment. I shot a few pictures in the elevator and then this perfect instant just happened: the position of the arm, the looks, the leg up.  This photo says a lot about those kids. Marissa and Mikey are friends and we can tell by this picture that they are really close. That’s how this community works. It might be a chaotic environment, but it is more about a big family, caring for each other, sharing and creating.”

Mae Ryan August 8, 2011

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Convent of Mary the Queen in Yonkers, NY 2010

Mae Ryan (b. 1987, United States) is a documentary photographer and multimedia producer based in Brooklyn, NY. She is a graduate of the Documentary Photography and Photojournalism Program at The International Center of Photography and holds a BS in Architectural Design from Stanford University. Her work has appeared in TIME Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The FADER and Architectural Record and she has produced multimedia pieces for Magnum In Motion. In 2010, Mae attended the Eddie Adams Workshop and in 2011 she won a scholarship to attend the Foundry Workshop in Buenos Aires.

About the Photograph:

“I took this photo of Sister Marilda on the first day that I stepped into the Convent of Mary the Queen in Yonkers, NY. The Sisters had invited me to document a funeral at their in-house chapel and as I was leaving I noticed that Sister Marilda was lingering in the foyer to watch her friends leave.  I later learned that over thirty years ago Sister Marilda fell ill and promised God that if her health improved she would wear the full habit until the day she died. Pictured behind her is Elizabeth Ann Seton, who founded the Sisters of Charity in 1809. This order of nuns was once a thriving community that served as teachers and nurses throughout the New York area. Today there are about 300 living members of the community, however no one has joined the order in the past five years. 80 of these nuns now live in the Convent of Mary the Queen, which the community established to take care of the aging Sisters as they approached the end of their lives.” (more…)

McNair Evans August 1, 2011

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Easter Morning, North Carolina 2010

McNair Evans (b. 1979, USA) found photography as a powerful ethnographic tool for exploring the human condition. His work draws parallels between the lives of individuals and universal shared experiences, correlations that create first-person narrative journeys. Recognizing subjectivity as an unalienable characteristic of our medium, McNair utilizes mental and emotional states as mood and context. He has received multiple graduate level scholarships and has been published in USA Today, the Academy of Art and National Geographic Adventurer. In 2011 McNair won the Curator’s Choice from CENTER.

About the Photograph:

“My elder sister Patricia and her husband are shown saying grace with our Mom’s hand reaching into the frame. An original member of this prayer circle, I saw the lighting, Mom’s hand gesturing to Patricia, and made this single image. Removing myself from the circle to photograph this intimate moment echoes the difficult balance of photographing loved ones. This photograph belongs to a larger series titled A Journal of Southern History that describes my return home in 2010 to photograph the lasting emotional landscape of my father’s death and insolvency. My goal was to retrace my father’s life, using photography as a vehicle of resolution. Within my immediate family, I witnessed intense affliction and perseverance. This theme resonates in my sister on Easter morning, which also conveys the continuum of religion in their lives.”

Carrie Will July 22, 2011

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Rikki and Carrie, Nyack, New York 2007

Carrie Will (b. 1979, United States) received her BFA from SUNY Purchase College in 2001 and her MFA from Syracuse University in 2008. Carrie’s work has been displayed in many group exhibitions and featured in online galleries Most recently her work was displayed in 100 portraits – 100 photographers, a night gallery projection on the Corcoran Gallery in conjunction with Fotoweek, DC 2010. Her work can be seen at the National Portrait Gallery in a showed entitled, Close To Home, Photographers and Their Families, at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC and in an upcoming show, The Summer Show Project in New York City at The Foley Gallery.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from the series entitled, I am redundant, half of a whole, a freak, identical and lucky. The series is about the relationship I have with my twin sister, Rikki, which is tightly woven, beautifully strange and difficult to explain. This has led me to explore a visual language that articulates the intimacy and the oddity of being a twin. In this photograph, we sit in the dining room at our father’s house. My sister and I have not lived in the same town since we were in high school but we talk everyday. Our meeting place is often our father’s home. Being a twin is amazing but it comes with some confusion, like where does she end and I begin? When she is away from me, I miss her, when she is with me I sometimes miss myself. Rikki and Carrie, Dining Room, represents the fact that we are identical twins, separate yet eternally connected.”

Brian Harkin July 4, 2011

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Google Headquarters, New York 2010

Brian Harkin (b. 1983, USA) is a freelance portrait and documentary photographer in New York City. Brian has an undergraduate degree in philosophy from The University of Missouri and began his freelance career in Dallas after an internship at The Dallas Morning News. He spent the first half of 2009 in Mexico City before relocating to New York, where he shoots regularly for The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. His other publication credits include: AARP, Smithsonian Magazine The Fader, The Financial Times, National Geographic Kids, NPR, among others.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is from an afternoon I spent at the Google headquarters in New York City on assignment for The Wall Street Journal. The story was on their huge new building, at 111 Eighth Ave, which spans the entire avenue block and was recently acquired in a nearly two billion dollar deal. Inside, the company offers a host of amenities (scooters, snacks, game rooms, etc.) to its employees, who seem to be an easygoing, diverse and productive group of people. I spent most of my time photographing these “Googlers” at their desks, and I found their idiosyncrasies to be a suitable contrast to the Google’s new architectural behemoth.”

Mary Beth Meehan June 22, 2011

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Irish Politicians on Election Night. Brockton, Massachusetts 2007

Mary Beth Meehan (b. 1967, USA) is a Providence-based documentary photographer who explores issues of culture, immigration, and community. Her goal is to create a connection with the people of those communities, whose identities are often obscured by economics, politics, or race. Images from her series City of Champions recently won Onward 11’s Juror Award, selected by Larry Fink. Her work has been exhibited and published widely, including in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and the Washington Post, and has been honored by Pictures of the Year International and The National Conference for Community and Justice. Her weekly photo-and-text column in the Providence Journal was one of the first to attract national acclaim, and was nominated twice for the Pulitzer Prize. Meehan teaches Documentary Photography at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

About the Photograph:

“My current series, City of Champions, is a look at my hometown of Brockton, Massachusetts, an effort to personalize the changes there of the last century, and to convey the emotional charge of so much change. The Irish were among the first to settle in Brockton, building the city with shoe-factory income, and amassing political power. They still dominate politics, even though the majority of residents are people of color, new immigrants come from the world’s poorest and most war-torn countries, and the city is beset by housing foreclosure, economic decline, and crime. This photograph was made in a bar on election night, when the Irish-American mayor with a 10th-grade education barely squeaked out re-election over an African-American man, who held advanced college degrees and had promised political reform. Here, the mayor’s supporters celebrated the close call, surrounded by idealized reminders of their own heritage.”

Bharat Choudhary June 17, 2011

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From the project “The Silence of ‘Others”. Chicago 2010

Bharat Choudhary (b. 1978, India) is a documentary photographer currently based in London. He spent his first 14 years in Nigeria before moving back to India with his parents. After a degree in forestry management, he spent five years working with non-governmental organizations, on issues of rural poverty and education. Things changed when his father gifted him with an old Asahi Pentax K2 and a Minolta X-700. Bharat realized that his photography could be the voice of many socially marginalized communities. He gave shape to his photography under the mentorship of Magnum photographer Raghu Rai and received an MA in Photojournalism from the University of Missouri in 2010. Presently, he is working on a project about young Muslims and Islamophobia in England, supported by the Alexia Foundation for World Peace grant.

About the Photograph:

“I was walking towards downtown Chicago with Kaiser when we both saw this busy beach next to an equally busy road. It was hot, we were tired and so we decided to rest there for a while before resuming our march towards the Millennium Park. Kaiser took out his sketchbook and the famous winds of Chicago added wings to an already interesting situation. I saw a lot of things in a few seconds. But what made that moment special to me was the sight of a ‘salad bowl’, instead of the so-called ‘melting pot’ that everyone loves to talk about. I do not see this as a visually delightful image that entertains, but I feel that it comes close to my idea of an image that forwards a reason for an informed debate. No single element in the image alone would’ve worked. But here every single unit serves as an equally relevant part of a very important whole. When I look at this image, I try to connect all these units and believe that together they honestly articulate the thoughts and feelings of Kaiser.” (more…)

Susan Worsham June 13, 2011

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Lynn and Max, Virginia 2009

Susan Worsham (b. 1969, USA) took her first photography class while studying graphic design in college.  In 2009 Susan was nominated for the Santa Fe Prize For Photography, and her book” Some Fox Trails In Virginia” won first runner up in the fine art category of  the Blurb Photography Book Now International Competition. In 2010 Susan was awarded the first TMC / Kodak Film Grant, and was an artist in residence at Light Work in Syracuse, New York. Her work is held in private collections, and has been exhibited at the Corcoran Museum during  FotoWeek D.C, The Photographic Center Northwest, Silver Eye Center for Photography, And Dean Jensen Gallery. She was recently named one of PDN’s 30 Emerging Photographers To Watch in 2011.

About the Photograph:

“The image shown here  Max With Black Plums, is from my personal project ” Some Fox Trails In Virginia” Through this series I photograph, the landscape of my childhood, but through the lens of my adult self. I use two women from different generations as my muses. Margaret Daniel, my oldest neighbor, and Lynn, the first stranger that I ever asked to pose for me. I have been photographing Lynn for over 19 years now. The image above is of Lynn and her son Max. The plums she holds in her lap are still close, echoing the mother and son bond at this age. I think the trust in our relationship comes through in the picture. There is a quiet intimacy that I have found while shooting Lynn and her family that I now look for in all of my subjects. We have grown into women together, and I hope to photograph her family for years to come.”

Sarah Wilson June 3, 2011

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James and Melissa from the series Blind Prom, Texas 2008

Sarah Wilson (b. 1977, USA) received her BFA in photography at NYU, and has returned to her hometown of Austin, Texas, where she works regionally as an editorial photographer for magazines such as The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Time, The Atlantic Monthly, Texas Monthly, Mother Jones, and others. Her series, Blind Prom was awarded the 2008 PhotoNOLA Portfolio Review Prize, and was exhibited in New Orleans at the Photo Alliance Gallery, in New York City at the Foley Gallery, and in China at the Lishui International Photography Festival. Several images from, Jasper, Texas: The Road To Redemption, documented the aftermath of the dragging death of James Byrd Jr., a shocking hate crime have been acquired by the permanent collections at both the University of Texas and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

About the Photograph:

“For the past four years, I have volunteered as the prom night photographer for the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. Starting with hair and makeup in the dorms, through the last dance at midnight, I aim to capture the entire prom ritual. Not only do the images memorialize this rite of passage for the attendees and their parents, but I also hope that the work will serve a larger audience as a medium for consideration of what life might be like as a blind teenager. This picture of James and Melissa is one of my favorite images from the series thus far. They were having one of those sweet, electric, young love moments while the other students were out on the dance floor.”

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