jump to navigation

Sean Carroll July 2, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Grazing Buck, Yosemite National Park, California, 2013

Sean Carroll  (b. 1978, United States) is an artist working in photography and video raised in coastal Massachusetts now based in New York City. His works have been shown in exhibitions in New York, Detroit, Washington, DC, Northern Virginia, and North Carolina, including most recently, at Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts and Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art. His photos have been featured by PDN, Fraction Magazine, Ain’t Bad, and Lint Roller. He received an MFA in Photography from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and a BA in Visual Media from American University in Washington, DC.

About the Photograph:

“Yosemite Valley is one of the most visited natural sites in America. A lush river valley surrounded by dramatic waterfalls and sheer granite cliffs it attracts crowds of tourists to it’s famous vista points. To serve the visitors it is filled with a myriad of options for lodging, dining, transportation, and shopping. The diverse wildlife that call the valley home must coexist with the crowds and live within the shadows of hotels, parking lots, RVs, and gift shops. Late afternoon in September I came upon this male mule deer grazing in a small meadow in Yosemite Valley adjacent to the historic Ahwahnee Hotel and it’s bustling outdoor restaurant. For nearly an hour the deer enjoyed a late afternoon snack before slipping back into the forest as a steady stream of visitors, weary from the day’s adventures, made their observation of the wildlife.”

Eugenio Grosso June 28, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Italy.
Tags:
comments closed

 
Faith in Sicily – Easter in Enna Italy 2012

Eugenio Grosso (b. 1984, Italy) graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts of Brera. He worked as a part-time commercial photographer since 2007 and then as full-time photojournalist since 2009. He is a regular contributor to Italian publications including: Corriere della Sera and la Repubblica and la Stampa. His work has been featured in the Guardian, the Financial Times, BBC and the Washington Post. He is currently working on the theme of immigration and the relationships between the populations living on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. Eugenio is based in London.

About the Photograph:

“I was born in Sicily and left my hometown when I was 18 to move to Milan in the north of Italy. Since then I have always had a conflicting relationship with my region. On the one hand I missed it while on the other I felt I was changing and couldn’t find myself in the same place and condition where i lived before. At the time when I took this photograph I was developing a project about religion and rituals in Sicily, trying to return to my roots and re-discover Sicily.”

“Photographing Easter in Sicily made me feel a bit uncomfortable at the beginning but, after a while, it became natural and the rest of the day went smooth. The main challenge was to keep the tourists with their smartphones out of the frame. Exploring the environment I was raised up in as an outsider helped me accept the pros and cons of my homeland and build a new more mature relationship with my origin.”

Gergely Szatmari June 25, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Hungary.
Tags:
comments closed


From the series “Meadowlands”. New Jersey 2009

Gergely Szatmári (b. 1966, Hungary) is a former university adjunct of the Photography Department, MOME, Budapest. He received his diploma from the same establishment, and also completed the doctoral programme there. Recently his activity turned towards his autonomous long-term photographic projects. His interest extends from documentary through narrative to conceptualism. His works has been exhibited at Viennafair, the Hungarian Cultural Centre in London, the Museum der Arbeit in Hamburg, the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, in Miami Scope, at London Art Fair and in the Lucca Photofestival in Italy. In 2008, he spent a year in the USA as a guest researcher, at Montclair State University (NJ). Alongside pedagogical activity, he also works as a curator.

About the Photograph: 

“Construction cake: The story takes place somewhere in New Jersey on a sleepy Saturday afternoon, when days are usually slowly passing by, but today is a special occasion. My Uncle and his wife drive to their daughter’s place, to the next street, to celebrate their grandson’s birthday. The boy loves cake and cars and construction vehicles. In the morning his grandparents had to drive to a neighbouring city, to pick-up the cake from a Mexican pastry shop to fulfill these desires. This is the only local place where you can commission such a cake. This shot was made using 10 by 8 inch film focused on a typical suburban moment of human engagement.”

David Pace June 22, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burkina Faso.
Tags:
comments closed


Two Tailors Bereba, Burkina Faso 2008

David Pace (b. 1951, United States) received his MFA from San Jose State University in 1991. He has taught photography in universities throughout the San Francisco Bay Area for 25 years. As Resident Director of Santa Clara University’s study abroad program in West Africa from 2009 – 2013, David spent ten weeks each year in the small country of Burkina Faso, where he has been photographing annually since 2007. For nearly a decade he has been documenting daily life in Bereba, a remote village without electricity or running water. His images of rural West Africa have been exhibited internationally and have appeared in LensCulture, Slate Magazine, The Huffington Post, PDN, Wall Street International, r and the German magazines Camera and View. His work has been featured on NPR’s The Picture Show and the Art Photo Index (API). A monograph of his project Sur La Route was published by Blue Sky Books in the fall of 2014. He resides in Los Altos, California.

About the Photograph:

“One August afternoon as I was walking through the ancient market that wraps around the towering baobab tree at the heart of the village of Bereba, a hypnotic humming sound attracted my attention. I followed the sound to a squat, windowless, mud-brick building. Natural light streaming through the doorway illuminated the faces of two tailors laboring at worn treadle sewing machines in a dark, cramped room. The walls of the room were draped with colorful fabrics and articles of clothing. Scraps of cloth were strewn about. The temperature, normally around 100 degrees, was even higher in the tight, airless space. I stood, mesmerized by the heat, and the intense concentration of the tailors, until the tailor in the background paused and gestured, indicating that I should take their picture. The tailor in the foreground remained absorbed in his work and never once looked up.”

Jason Tannen June 18, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Chinatown, San Francisco 2011

Jason Tannen (b. 1950, USA) is a photographer, curator, and photo educator. For over three decades his work has explored the urban landscape, utilizing both an observational street photography approach, and a more controlled and cinematic style. Recent exhibitions have included SF Camerawork, Black Box Gallery, Portland, OR, Index Art Center, Newark, NJ, Bakehouse Art Complex, Miami, FL, and Fukushima Contemporary Art Biennale, Fukushima, Japan. From 1998 to 2014 Jason was the curator at the University Art Gallery at California State University, Chico, where he also taught Film as Visual Art and the History of Photography. He is currently developing Two Truths and A Lie, an exhibition featuring work by New York tabloid photographer Weegee (Arthur Fellig 1899-1968) for the University Art Gallery, California State University, Chico.

About the Photograph:

“In 2010, I started a project photographing San Francisco’s Chinatown neighborhood. I was drawn to Chinatown’s physical and visual density of buildings, storefronts, signs and symbols. For me, those elements could best be explored in black and white. Over time, I was struck by the neighborhood’s ever-present cultural mixing of East and West, especially a unique, personal and sometimes highly eccentric approach to commercial display. When I photographed Pyramid, I was shooting close to the windows, looking deep into the storefronts and allowing foreground objects to loom around the edges of the frame. The result here is a composition featuring diagonal lines and crossing shapes, the reflected urban backdrop, and a reference to the human presence.​”

Irving Villegas June 15, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Mexico.
Tags:
comments closed


Day of the Dead. San Andrés Mixquic, Mexico City 2013

Irving Villegas (b. 1982 Mexico) is a freelance photographer currently based in Hannover, Germany. Since 2005 he collaborated with national and international newspapers, photo agencies and NGOs. In 2011 he began his studies in photojournalism and documentary photography at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Hannover. He is currently working on a project called working far away about seasonal workers in different countries. For the first chapter of this project he received the Grant Novel Authors from the Photo Festival Spain and Honorable Mention at the Perugia Social Photo Festival in Italy. Irving is a contributor at INSTITUTE for Artist Management.

 About the Photograph:

“Between adults and young people there are two kids on their knees praying. The youngest one watches his grandmother to mimic her movements. For this family, as it is for many others in this town, it is important that children participate and learn about traditional celebrations so they can last for a very long time. After praying and singing, participants receive some food to take home, later at night they go together to the tomb of a relative in the cemetery. In this part of the city, people are struggling to preserve their traditions, even while the American tradition of Halloween has been spreading in many of the towns most of the Mexican families maintain their traditions. This image is part of the photo essay Tradition is still alive“.

Jessica Auer June 11, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Las Vegas, Nevada, 2004

Jessica Auer (b.1978, Canada) is a documentary-style landscape photographer concerned with the study of cultural sites focusing on themes that connect place, journey and cultural experience. Jessica holds an MFA from Concordia University and is the recipient of several awards such as the W.B. Bruce European Fine Art Travel Fellowship and the Roloff Beny Prize. Her work has been exhibited in galleries, museums and public spaces across Canada and abroad. Her first book, Unmarked Sites, was noted by Photo-Eye and the Indie Photobook Library as one of the top ten photography books published in 2011. Jessica is a co-founder of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University.

About the Photograph:

“This was the first photo that I produced for a series titled Re-creational Spaces, a project that I pursued for seven years and became my best-known work. At that time I considered creating a photographic series exclusively about Las Vegas and booked a cheap ticket to do some scouting. I had just read Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s Learning from Las Vegas as part of my MFA thesis research and the opening sentence stuck with me, Learning from an existing landscape is a way of being revolutionary for an architect. Having long been interested in landscape and the built environment, I was curious to see for myself how the Strip had shifted and evolved since the 70’s.”

“When I arrived camera in hand, I gravitated towards the hotels that were smaller-scale replicas of other places in the World – Paris, New York, and in the case of this photo, Venice. What I remember most about the moment I took this photo was contemplating how this site must have looked before the city was built, and this image in mind – a nearly blank desert landscape – was such a stark contrast to what I was witnessing. When I later looked at this image in print and was able to spend more time with all details, such as the gondola driver on his PDA, and the words Mirage repeated over and over, I decided to only use this one photograph. From there, I began a series linking different tourist destinations, showing how the landscape has been altered and commodified for sightseeing.”

Paul Colangelo June 7, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Canada.
Tags:
comments closed


Iskut River, British Columbia 2010

Paul Colangelo (b. 1980, USA) is a documentary photographer focusing on environmental issues and wildlife. For the past five years he has worked on a long-term project called “Our Home and Native Land” that looks at how cultural and wildlife hotspots across Canada are affected by the nation’s expanding resource industry. Paul is a National Geographic grantee, a member of the International League of Conservation Photographers and was included among PDN’s 30. Paul has worked with National Geographic News, BBC, WWF, Canadian Geographic and Orion.

About the Photograph:

“This river begins in the Sacred Headwaters. Back in 2004, very few people outside of the Tahltan First Nation had ever heard of this area. On maps it wasn’t labelled nor delineated—it was hidden in the vast wilderness of northern British Columbia. Back then it wasn’t even called the Sacred Headwaters. It was known as the Klappan. But this type of name, with its multiple pronunciations and lack of obvious meaning, wouldn’t serve well in a conservation campaign. So the Tahltan settled on the Sacred Headwaters—their best effort to convey the importance of this place to their ecosystem and culture. Their campaign was launched in response to Shell gaining tenure of about a million acres in the Klappan for a coal-bed methane development.”

“For nearly a decade, the Tahltan Nation and its supporters fought to get Shell out of the Sacred Headwaters, and in 2012, they actually won. A small remote community took on one of the world’s largest corporations and won. Along with other photographers, I did what I could by photographing the Sacred Headwaters to bring it into the living rooms of people who would never go there themselves. The goal was to encourage them to raise their voices alongside the Tahltan. Unfortunately, less than a year after this success, a coal mine was proposed for the very same place that Shell just vacated. The Tahltan are once again fighting for the Sacred Headwaters.”

Sarker Protick June 4, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Bangladesh.
Tags:
comments closed


John and Prova. Dhaka, Bangladesh 2012

Sarker Portick (b.1986, Bangladesh) discovered photography finished his bachelor’s degree and he enrolled at Pathshala. His photographs have been published in The New York TimesGEO The New YorkerNational GeographicDie Zeit and Wired among others. In 2012, Sarker won the Prix Mark Grosset Internationales De Photographie and the World Bank Art Program. In 2014, he was named in British Journal Of Photography’s annual Ones to Watch. The same year, Sarker was selected for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2015, he went on to win a World Press Photo award for his story What Remains and selected for PDN’s 30. His work has been exhibited at Chobi Mela International Photography Festival, Noorderlicht Photo Festival and the Photovisa Festival,

About the Photograph:

“It was in the afternoon. I was sitting on my grandpa’s couch. The door was slightly open and I saw light coming through,  between the white door and white walls. All of a sudden it all started making sense. I could relate what I was seeing with what I felt. John and Prova, my grandparents.”

“While growing up, I found much love and care from them. They were young and strong. As time went by it shaped everything in it’s own way. Bodies took different forms and relations went distant. Grandma’s hair turned gray, the walls started peeling off and the objects were all that remained. Everything was contained into one single room. They always loved the fact that I took pictures of them, because then I spend more time with them and they didn’t feel lonely anymore. After Prova passed away, I try to visit more so John can talk. He tells me stories of their early life, and how they met. There are so many stories. Here life is silent, Everything is suspended. A wait for something that I don’t completely understand

“John and Prova were married for more than 50 years. In their late years, they had to sleep separate because Prova required a special bed for her back. The two beds occupied most of the space in the room along with other furniture. For this reason, it was not possible for them to sit close together. I was happy to take this photograph because it brought them close together after a long time. They touched, kissed and held each other and I was able to witness that beautiful moment. Long after grandma passed away I realized this is the only photograph of my Grand Parents together from their last years. Now it hangs in the same room where only John sleeps.”

Lukas Berger May 31, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Pakistan.
Tags:
comments closed


Lucky Irani Circus. Punjab, Pakistan 2012

Lukas Berger (b. 1989, Austria) studied photojournalism & documentary photography in Hanover, Germany and is currently based there. His photographic work brought him to places like Pakistan, Burkina Faso, Uzbekistan, Ethiopia and many European countries. The project Circus was published as a book by the German publisher Kettler and at TIME Lightbox. Lukas is co-founder of the art space/gallery BOHAI in Hanover.

About the Photograph:

“These are the clowns Mohammed & Tareq. When I tell the story about those two I always talk about good cop and bad cop. I had lived in Pakistan for almost one and a half years when I came across the Lucky Irani Circus. It fascinated me to find such a big circus in a country you mostly associate with political issues and natural desasters in daily media. The clown Tareeq, the one on the left side, enjoyed being photographed by me and showed me some of his clown tricks. Since my Urdu was good enough to communicate basic manners at that time, he told me his story how he came to the circus. As a midget it was difficult for him to stay with his family or get a usual job. So he decided to join the circus and start a new life there. Mohammed was the bad cop, he never talked much with me and often looked angry. Twice I went on stage with them to perform a number, where they beat each other up and Mohammed was very much after me. Of course, only on stage.“

Joel Hawksley May 28, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


From a story about returning Vets, Carbondale, Illinois 2014

Joel Hawksley (b.1990, United States) is a freelance photographer and web application developer based in Providence, Rhode Island. A former newspaper photographer at The Roanoke Times, his clients include The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, and AARP. His work has been recognized by College Photographer of the Year, Hearst Journalism Awards, and the National Press Photographers Association, among others. Joel is also the creator of SoloFolio.

About the Photograph:

“Shooting sometimes as many as five assignments a day during my time at The Southern Illinoisan, a small paper in Carbondale, Illinois, often meant little time to linger and wait for the right moments. Thankfully, my editor did his best to give me the time I needed when I asked for it, and this photograph is a direct result of that understanding. As the local VA hospital was an important part of the community, our staff spent a lot of time covering veteran’s issues, including many efforts to help those with war-related injuries live healthy and meaningful lives. For this assignment, we were invited to spend time with a group of veterans as they visited a hunting club on a cold, late-November morning. Just as the last fog was lifting, I crouched in the hunting blind with Ryley as he eyed a duck across the pond. We both got the shot.”

Luca Catalano Gonzaga May 24, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Indonesia.
Tags:
comments closed


Ijen Kawah volcano in Eastern Java, Indonesia 2014

Luca Catalano Gonzaga (b. 1965 Italy) has a degree in Economics. In 2008 he became a full-time professional photographer, focusing mainly on social issues and portraits. He was awarded the Grand Prix Care du Reportage Humanitarie in 2009 for a feature on child labour in Nepal, which was shown at Visa Pour l’Image. 2010. He co-founded Witness Image, a non-profit association developing photographic projects on human rights issues. Luca received funding from the Nando Peretti Foundation, to carry out the project Child Survival in a Changing Climate (2011) and in collaboration with UNPO (Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization), for the project Invisible People (2013). His work has been published in Geo, The Guardian, New York Times and the Washington Post. Luca is based in Rome.

About the Photograph:

“Sahron, 20 years old, has been mining sulfur for five years. He climbs the vulcano daily with a load of almost 70 kg of sulfur carried in reed baskets, a path he makes twice a day for 10 euros. On his way up he stops to catch his breath again and alleviate the pain caused by the overload. He works inside the womb of the Ijen Kawah volcano in Eastern Java. Every day three hundred men leave the base camp at the slopes of the mountain to reach the top of the volcano. They climb up three kilometres and then head downwards until the opening of the crater where the sulfur crystals lie. Nine hundred meters deep towards hell, defying the unbearable heat, rarefied air, without any protection. The sulfur slabs are broken with the help of a metal pole and then carried in reed baskets that weigh between 70 to 90 kilos.Then begins the return path of the 21st century sulfur picker, heading towards the volcano’s entrance, in a precarious balance, carrying a huge load that deforms the spine, bends the legs and produces ulcers on his shoulders. A very hard kind of work which will end soon – the average life expectancy of the sulfur miners does not go beyond 50 years.”

Michael Santiago May 20, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags:
comments closed


Zoilo Santiago, Luz Santiago and Emma Santiago. Pomona, NY 2013

Michael Santiago (b. 1980 USA) is a documentary photographer based between New York and Oakland. Michael’s work focuses on issues concerning people of color and their communities; obesity, cancer, race and identity, family relationships, healthy eating, youth empowerment and more. A senior at the San Francisco Art Institute, he studies documentary photography and brings a strong cultural awareness to his work. He is the recipeint of the 2015 Alexia Foundation student grant for his project Stolen Land, Stolen Future a body of work focusing on Black farmers of California and his long term projects A Promise, 250 and Michael.

About the Photograph:

“On the weekends when my older brother has to work my mother Luz watches my niece. Around this particular time my father’s health began to steadily decline. His energy would be depleted faster than usual especially on days after dialysis. He often would doze off at any given moment. With my niece being sick this day, she was not as rambunctious as usual and with my father napping my mother took this quiet moment to just gather her thoughts and relax. My father Zoilo at this point had been battling prostate cancer since 1998 and was also dealing with kidney failure. At the time that this photo was taken I had been photographing his daily life for six months and it was around this time that my mother let me photograph her and include her in my work.”

Dario Bosio May 18, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Brazil.
Tags:
comments closed


Police raid. Altamira, Brazil 2013

Dario Bosio (b.1988, Italy) obtained a degree in Journalism at Florence University and graduated in both TV-Documentary and Photojournalism at the Danish School of Media and Journalism. In 2012, together with an international community of authors, he founded PanAut Collective, a platform for visual narrative projects. In 2013 he interned at NOOR Images in Amsterdam and joined the iPad magazine About Photography as part of the editorial staff. He later moved to Rome where he worked as a project coordinator, co-curator and production assistant at 10b Photography until July 2014.  His projects have been published and exhibited internationally. He is now based in Napoli and moving to Kurdistan to work at Metrography photo agency as a picture editor and project manager.

About the Photograph:

“Due to the huge immigration rate Altamira is experiencing a crime wave that the police are struggling to fight. Drug traffic, prostitution and robberies have increased since the construction of Belo Monte began. I was in Altamira, in the state of Parà, Brazil, for a project about the Belo Monte Dam, which is being built right now on the Xingu River. The construction of the massive dam, the third largest in the world attracted  thousands of immigrant workers from all over the country. One night, I was following the Military Police during a night raid in one of the favelas and, after they arrested a guy with a revolver in a bar nearby they stopped again and stormed this brothel. I entered in the brothel right after three policemen stepped in with assault rifles and asked everyone to line up and face the wall. I was actually quite amazed by how calm the situation looked despite the tension of the moment. It was really silent, as two agents – male and female – searched the customers and the staff one by one before asking them to wait outside. In the meantime, two other officers looked for drugs in the rooms and the toilets. I shot this photo while the police was questioning some of the customers and three agents armed with rifles kept an eye on the suspects that were still lined up against the wall, waiting for their turn.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,118 other followers