jump to navigation

Edward van Herk June 9, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in South Africa, Soweto.
Tags: ,
3 comments


Construction worker, Soweto Township

Edward van Herk (b 1973) in the Netherlands is passionate about documentary photography His interest began after 2003 when he lost his son. “Becoming involved in this work taught me to see because I needed to deal with my grief”. During his extensive travels as an airline pilot he became increasingly aware of the crisis in many parts of the world and felt drawn to the documentary photographic essay. Edward is mainly a self taught photographer.

About the Photograph:

Final construction at the Maponya mall in Piville township, Soweto. The 650 million Rand mall is one of the largest shopping centers in South Africa, and its opening is a sign of the commercial awakening of Soweto. The mall is likely to change the face and shopping habits of Soweto residents, who, in the past, have had to leave their area to go and do their shopping in the former white areas. In the past 80% of all disposable income was spent outside Soweto. “In November 2007 I photographed an assignment for a cultural center in Soweto. Since 1948 when Apartheid officially started, Soweto has grown into 27 townships with a population of 3.5 million just 25 kilometers southwest of Johannesburg. Today it is buzzing with spirit and celebrating the unique culture, heritage and history of struggle. My essay ‘Deep Soweto’ is dedicated to the proud people of Soweto. The title is the name of a hiphop gang and stands for the deep connection I felt with the people”. It’s obvious in looking at this work that the connection was mutual.

James Whitlow Delano June 6, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burma.
Tags: , ,
add a comment


Villagers in Nawpyando brace themselves against the odor of death wafting up from corpses, animal and human, that the tide has brought into the Irrawaddy River Delta following Cyclone Nargis, Burma.

James Whitlow Delano recently returned from Burma with photographs that the world should see. His work in Afghanistan was awarded 1st place in the 2008 NPPA Best of Photojournalism competition for Best Picture Story (large markets). He received the Alfred Eisenstaedt (Eisie) Award administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and presented by Life Magazine, for work done in China. His photographs have also received the Award of Excellence three times from Communication Arts Photography Annual for work done in China, West Africa and monograph book publishing. James has been cited with awards in the PDN Photography Annual five times. Delano’s 2003 Three Gorges and 2004 Shenzhen, China projects have been cited with Picture of the Year International awards. He lives in Tokyo.

About the Photograph:

“Three days of driving rain had already begun to ruin the dry season rice harvest, leaving the crop under water, before I returned to Yangon from Bago on the day the cyclone struck. I was in Myanmar (Burma) entirely by chance, working for a South Korean client on a documentary on the lives of two men living in exile since the 1988 crackdown. I was photographing places and things that represented their lives in Burma. Then the storm turned everything on its head.” Follow these links to read more of Delano’s account and photos from Burma.

Marc Dozier June 5, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Papua New Guinea.
Tags: ,
add a comment


Fabien and Kapuela Preparing for Celebration. Papua New Guinea

34 year old French photojournalist Marc Dozier has been a photo reporter for ten years with the French travel magazine Grands Reportages. After studying literature in his hometown of Grenoble, Marc continued to study graphic arts in Paris and at an unlikely institution: the University of Papua New Guinea in Port Moresby. Every year since 1996 Marc spends several months renewing friendships with his “Papuan brothers”. In 2003, Marc invited two Papua New Guinean friends Mudeya and Polobi on a grand tour of France. This hilarious account, a photographic journal “Le long-long voyage” was published in April 2007. The previous year, with the support of Bonne Pioche production house, Marc received his Papuan friends for a brand new adventure shot in a 100 minute documentary, called the “The Reverse Exploration” co-written by Jean-Marie Barrère. Marc plans to organize more photography trips to Papua New Guinea and eventually publish a book about that country.

About the Photograph:

“After ten days of being stuck in a small hut, sheltered from tropical storms, the sun finally came back. It was right on time for this special occasion that had me coming to this place. In July – only when harvests have been good – the Trobriand islands’ tribes of Papua New Guinea organize a big festival to celebrate nature and mankind’s fertility. For more than a century, missionaries have had a strong influence on their culture and converted the whole community to Christianity. They have been trying for decades to ban this famous celebration known as “Milamala” where young teenagers, of both sex, gather together with their parent’s approval. The first morning, everybody got very excited in the village Kanobasi. Inside the hut, Fabien Tolosi and Kapuela Botaya started to get their body decoration ready for “Wosi Mwaya”. During this traditional dance, boys try and seduce girls. Sitting next to the dancers, I started to shoot them when I noticed something odd hanging on the hut’s wall: a picture of Pope John-Paul ll (upper-right corner) who looked in disarray. I could not help but smile and think that traditions are still stronger than new religions.”

Lisa Krantz June 4, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
Tags: ,
1 comment so far

The Edwards Family. San Antonio, Texas 2007

Lisa Krantz is a staff photographer at the San Antonio Express-News where she has worked since March 2004. She has covered diverse stories such as the selection of Pope Benedict XVI in Rome, HIV issues in Africa, and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. She was the 2005 NPPA Region 8 Photographer of the Year and runner-up for 2004 and 2006. Her work has been recognized by POYi, Best of Photojournalism, the Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar and the Southern Short Course. Krantz received her Masters degree in Photography from Syracuse University and a Psychology degree from Florida State University. Lisa is currently documenting the transition of a small Texas Hill town as it struggles with maintaining its country identity in the midst of modern development and urban sprawl.

About the Photograph:

“I met the Edwards family during a daily newspaper assignment to find and photograph a family with school age children living at the Salvation Army, dealing with the pressures of starting the school year with no home. The Edwards family had been at the shelter for several days and had five children starting school the next day. I spent the evening with them as they carefully laid out their first day of school clothes, all donated, and returned at 6 am to go with them to their new schools. I photographed the family over the next few days knowing the story would run soon. I continued to photograph the family after the story ran as they moved into an apartment in hopes of a future story. The family was so anxious to leave the shelter, they moved into the apartment with no furniture. The first few nights, the entire family slept together in a tiny room on the only carpeted floor. In this picture, Breanna Edwards, 14, cuddles with her mother, Laura Edwards, while Austin Edwards, 16, lies nearby on their second night in the apartment. I have continued to photograph the family and a follow-up story will run soon as the school year comes to a close this week. “

Karl Banchet June 3, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ghana.
Tags: , ,
add a comment


Boxing in Accra , Ghana 2005

Karl Blanchet is a freelance photographer based in London. Through his work, Karl tries to tell the stories of people who have something to say and bring attention to humanitarian issues. Karl is an active member of the international collective of photographers Luna. Karl’s images are distributed by the agencies Visum in Germany, Zuma in the US, INA in the Nordic countries and Contrasto in Italy.

About the Photograph:

Accra’s old quarter, Jamestown, is home to 21 boxing clubs. Every evening, courtyards and old houses are transformed into training rings for young men, ages 16 to 22. The young boxers dream of becoming great champions who will fight in the US or the UK. They see boxing as their one shot to become rich and famous, and they hope to follow in the footsteps of the great Ghanaian boxers who have achieved international stardom. But the path to boxing glory is still very long.

Rachel Papo June 2, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Israel.
Tags: ,
1 comment so far

Officer Natali.Tsaelim Training Camp, Israel. 2005

Rachel Papo is an Israeli who was born in 1970 in Columbus, Ohio but was raised in Israel. She began photographing as a teenager and attended a renowned fine-arts high-school in Haifa, Israel. At age eighteen she served in the Israeli Air Force as a photographer. These two intensive years of service inspired her current photographic book project titled after her own number during service – Serial No. 3817131. Rachel earned a BFA in Fine Arts from Ohio State University in Columbus (1991-96), and an MFA in Photography from the School of Visual Arts in New York City (2002-05). She began photographing Israeli female soldiers in the summer of 2004 as part of her masters thesis project. She continues to photograph in both Israel and New York, pursuing fine art photography and accepting commissioned projects. Her photographs are included in several public and private collections. She currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.

About the Photograph:

“The photographs in this project serve as a bridge between past and present—a combination of my own recollections and the experiences of the girls who I observed. Each image embodies traces of things that I recognize, illuminating fragments of my history, striking emotional cords that resonate within me. In some way, each is a self-portrait, depicting a young woman caught in transient moments of introspection and uncertainty, trying to make sense of a challenging daily routine. In striving to maintain her gentleness and femininity, the soldier seems to be questioning her own identity, embracing the fact that two years of her youth will be spent in a wistful compromise.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,739 other followers