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Christina Paige January 29, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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American Girl Place on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan

Christina Paige (b.1972, USA) is a graduate of the International Center of Photography’s program in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism.  She was chosen as one of Photo District News’s 30 Emerging Photographers for 2008, where she was described as finding “grace and bits of humor swirling in the maelstrom of everyday life.”  Before becoming a photographer, she worked as a clinical social worker with Spanish-speaking communities in California and Massachusetts. Christina clients include: Esquire, W Magazine, Vrij Nederland, ESPN The Magazine, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Technology Review and The Wall Street Journal.  She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken outside of American Girl Place, a high-end doll shop on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, where I ended up taking many photos for a series about women and beauty. On this day, there were hundreds of girls waiting in line to audition for the Kit Kittredge movie. Most of the pictures I shot that day have a manic quality, but this little girl seemed quite calm, more interested in her pretzel than the commotion around her. I think I only took two frames. I usually work quickly and think little—I only noticed the repeating patterns in the image later on in the editing process—the time when most things become clear for me.”

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Jared Mossy January 27, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Georgia.
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Tbilisi, Georgia, August 2008

Jared Moossy (b.1980, USA) is a documentary photographer based in Dallas, Texas. He is represented by Redux Pictures in New York and is a member of Razon. Jared graduated from Parsons School of Design in 2008. His work has mostly been focused on the changing country of Afghanistan and the heightened tension of Mexico’s internal war on Drugs. Jared attended the Eddie Adams Workshop in 2008 and won the PDN Photo Annual and Marty Forcher fellowship fund the same year. He was awarded a place in PDN 30′s emerging photographers in 2009. His work has been published in Newsweek, Time, The Wall Street Journal, Stern, Magazine, Conde Nast Traveler and Die Ziet.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph of a Georgian soldier released during a prisoner exchange with the South Ossetians arrived at Ghudushauri hospital and was reunited with his loved ones. It was taken amidst a point of uncertainly shortly after the conflict started, and the release of the prisoners during that conflict gave the Georgians a sense of hope in a time when most Georgians thought the conflict would grow. I think this photograph conveys a struggle separated by two clearly defined sides and shows the viewer a look of desperation and apprehension in the eyes of this Georgian soldier.”

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Erik Lunsford January 25, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Twins, St. Louis, Missouri, 2009

Erik Lunsford (b.1980, USA) is currently a staff photojournalist at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He previously worked at The Stuart (FL) News and the Palm Beach Post in West Palm Beach before returning to St. Louis in 2007. He interned first at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, then at the Springfield (IL) State Journal-Register and the Peoria (IL) Journal-Star before heading to Florida. A St. Louis University graduate, Erik documents stories ranging from news to sports and features in his own hometown community.

About the Photograph:

“I was assigned to shoot a family homeschooling their children in downtown St. Louis. After a period of “class” in the living room, the family broke for playtime in their loft garden. I had been following the twin girls hoping to document them in the same frame when patience paid off and they climbed on the swing. After only a few seconds of squirming between the bars and cushions, the girls alighted from the swing to the sound of their mother’s calling. Moreover, it wasn’t until I was preparing selects for the editor later in the newsroom when I saw this image pop off the edit. Not only were other staff photojournalists surprised by the uniqueness of the girls’ positioning, but the image seemed to emote a fleeting connectivity between the twins. Although they are two entirely separate individuals, they for a brief moment were one and the same.”

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Reiner Riedler January 22, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Dubai.
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Indoor Skiing Hall, Dubai 2006

Reiner Riedler (b. 1968, Austria) attended a college for photography in Vienna. He began working for periodicals and magazines. His work has been published in National Geographic, Stern, Newsweek, Fortune, Le Monde  and others. His books include: “Albanien, Leben an der Peripherie” (Albania, Life on the Periphery), 2001, “Ukraine. Fotografien” (Ukraine. Photographs), 2003 “Gestürmte Festung Europa” (The Stormed Fortress of Europe), 2007. Reiner’s photographs have also been shown in numerous countries at photo festivals, galleries and museums. His most recent project (begun in 2004) is dedicated to the topic of simulation “Fake Holidays” has been shown at the Kunsthalle Schirn in Frankfurt, at the European Month of Photography exhibitions in Paris and Bratislava, and at Visa pour l’image in Perpignan.

About the Photograph:

“The picture was shot in an indoor skiing dome called “Ski Dubai” inside of a big shopping mall in Dubai. Before I went to this place, I have seen many other indoor skiing sites in Europe. For me these places are fascinating, because as a beginner it is really hard to come down the 500 metres. Skiing was always a part of my life since I grew up close to the Alps. Also the idea that you can simulate not only a place but an entire winter season at a place where there is normally no snow. It really happens that people go there and see and touch snow for the first time of their life.”

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Jake Verzosa January 20, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Philippines.
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Child boxer, Davao, Philippines 2008

Jake Verzosa (b.1979, Philippines) is a freelance photographer based in Manila. His editorial clients include: Marie Claire, Men’s Health, and Cosmopolitan.  Jake was recently  commissioned by ASEAN, to document inspiring stories in Southeast Asia for the book “Young Southeast Asia”.  He has exhibited at the Photoquai Biennial in Paris, France.

About the Photograph:

“I worked on the child boxers story during the rise of Filipino ring idol Manny Pacquiao to boxing greatness. This image shows one of the young hopefuls getting ready for a tournament fight at a run-down boxing gym in Mindanao. The sport has spurred renewed interest among the youth in the Philippines because of Pacquiao’s success story. The kids see this as a chance to escape the shackles of poverty by training hard despite the lack of food, funding and training facilities. Only when they have gone through a grueling climb to the top can the privileged few get sponsorships and opportunities to follow their hero’s path.”

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Lori Duff January 18, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Town Meeting, New Hampshire 2007

Lori Duff (b.1971, USA) is a photographer and writer based in Vermont. Her work has been supported by a student award of excellence from the Alexia Foundation for World Peace, a University of Missouri “Truth with a Camera” scholarship and honored by Pictures of the Year International, NPPA Best of Photojournalism, Society for News Design and the New England Press Association (Photographer of the Year). Her photo career began at the age of thirty after working for a park in Kentucky, apprenticing as an actress at Actors Theater and serving as a Peace Corps water and sanitation volunteer in the Ivory Coast. She earned her B.A. at Indiana University and her M.A. in Journalism at the University of Missouri. Before moving to Vermont she worked for the Concord Monitor in New Hampshire for four years.

About the Photograph:

“This image was made during town meeting time in Sutton, New Hampshire. During the annual winter event, voters from an entire geographic area gather (many in their plaid shirts and boots) to participate in the lawmaking process of their town. This New England tradition has been around since colonial times and is said to be the last vestige of direct democracy left in America. During the meeting, citizens are allowed to take the microphone and give their opinions on the articles in question. Time limits are imposed, as debate can sometimes go long into the night. I love the idea that 100 years ago this photo might have played out in a similar way. Voters would have turned out in the same seats, had the same deliberation, argued about town upkeep and manifested their annoyance in the same manner. To me the moment conveys the character of the granite state and is somehow both totally ordinary and historic at the same time.”

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Ross Mantle January 15, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Ohio University, United States.
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Open Swim, Camp Hill, Pittsburgh 2007

Ross Mantle (b.1985, USA) is a freelance photographer based in Pittsburgh, Pa. He holds a degree in Visual Communication from Ohio University and has worked for newspapers and on projects throughout the United States and abroad. His work has been featured in publications worldwide, including The Wall Street Journal and the New York Times among others. Ross’ personal work often focuses on the quirks of American life and the unique relationship between person and place. Ross enjoys riding bikes, eating cheap burritos and making iced tea. He’d be happy to play you in air hockey or take an assignment anywhere you may want to send him.

About the Photograph:

“I was interning for a newspaper in central Pennsylvania during the summer a couple years ago and got an assignment at this pool. Adult swim had just ended and the pool became chaotic again with kids. I saw this woman walking back across the platform. She had such a wonderful bathing suit on, one I thought you would only find in Florida, and it matched the color of the paint perfectly. So I made a couple frames, then the two girls popped in from the sides and this frame came together. There’s something so timeless and nostalgic about public swimming pools. I feel like the scene in this photo is one of a very typical suburban American summer. The paper never ran it though, I think they said it would be unflattering.”

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Francesco Zizola January 13, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Uzbekistan.
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Aral Sea, Khodjely City, Uzbekistan

Francesco Zizola (b.1962, Italy) has published four books: his most recent “Iraq” published with Amnesty International (2007) documents the beginning of Iraq II, a war which has become off limits for photographers.  “Né Quelque Part – Born Somewhere” (2004 ) was the result of 13 years covering the situation of children around the world in 28 countries. Francesco has received numerous international awards and prizes, including the World Press Photo of The Year in 1996, documenting the tragedy of land mines in Angola, eight World Press Photo awards and four Pictures of the Year Awards. He is a founding member of the photographic agency “NOOR” and currently lives in Rome.

About the Photograph:

“I made this photo in the courtyard of the Republican Recovery School for children with serious malformations. The rate of infant morbidity as well as the rates of maternal and child mortality in this region are ten times higher than in Europe. Nearly 90% of the adolescents are anemic, 30% have kidney disease, 23% have thyroid deficiency and 20% have chronic hepatitis. One in three women has had a stillborn child. More then 90% of pregnant women have severe anemia and 30% of childbirths have complications due to hypertension during their pregnancy. The Aral Sea was one of the largest lakes in the world. But, in the 1950s, the Soviet Union decided to cultivate cotton in the region. The lake is now a third of its original size.”

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Eli Meir Kaplan January 11, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Constance Regaldo and Daniel Tuttle, Jr., San Antonio, TX, 2009

Eli Meir Kaplan (b.1978, USA) is a photographer and multimedia producer based in Austin, TX. He discovered photography on a volunteer program in Israel during the second Intifada when he realized that he was skilled at interacting with people in misunderstood populations and felt a need to help their voice be heard. Bruce Davidson’s “East 100th Street” and mentorship from Andre Lambertson at the International Center of Photography in New York City later inspired Eli to pursue photography full-time. Eli graduated from the University of Texas Master of Arts program in photojournalism in 2009, finishing his master’s report on autism. An alumnus of the Eddie Adams Workshop, Eli’s clients include Time.com, The Wall Street Journal and Texas Monthly.

About the Photograph:

“I chose autism as the topic for my master’s report at the University of Texas at Austin because my sister is an applied behavioral analysis therapist. I was interviewing families for my report when I met Daniel Tuttle, Jr. and his foster mother, Sandra Stephenson. Autism has been covered a lot, but Sandra and Daniel’s story was different from what I had seen before. At 14 years-old, Daniel still could not communicate at all and was not toilet trained, which is very unusual at his age. Sandra was open to me photographing, but I was both surprised and grateful that Daniel’s biological mother, Connie, was as well. Connie sees her son on weekends, but for the most part she has relinquished caregiver responsibilities, like the toilet-training regimine pictured, to Sandra. I thought she might be defensive about it and about Daniel’s delayed development, but she didn’t have anything to hide.”

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Afton Almaraz January 8, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Hasidic Jewish man at Coney Island, Brooklyn, NY

Afton Almaraz (b. 1981, USA) is a freelance photographer based out of New York. Photographing for the Associated Press, Getty Images, Reuters, Aurora Photos and Zuma Press, his work has appeared in publications such as Time Magazine, Newsweek, US News & World Report, LIFE, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He’s an alumnus of the Eddie Adams Workshop XXI, College Photographer of the Year award recipient in both 2007 & 2008, and recognized in the PDN Photo Annual 2009 and Sportsshooter.com. Prior to graduating with a B.A. from Brooks Institute of Photography, he interned as a photo editor with the TIME Asia photo department in Hong Kong, the photo department of California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, and under legendary surf photographer Art Brewer. Today he divides his  time photographing personal projects, and working as a news photo editor at AOL.

About the Photograph:

“Not having lived in New York for very long, I felt compelled to try and tackle a long-term personal project that expresses the cultural fabric and attractions that define the city today. This image was taken prior to Coney Island closing for the season. Hasidic Jewish families overtook the beach, boardwalk and amusement park, as if they rented the entire place for the day. After spending a good amount of time photographing families on the beach, I ran across this man by himself reading from his prayer book. I found it particularly interesting witnessing what was actually happening in front of me – modern Hasidic Judaism faith from the 18th century being practiced in one of America’s most iconic landmarks from the late 19th century. To me this expresses best what New York, a place mostly made-up of immigrants, is today.”

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Greg Constantine January 6, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Nepal.
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Southern Nepal, 2008

Greg Constantine (b. 1970, USA) has been based in Southeast Asia since early 2006. For the last four years, he has been working on a project entitled, Nowhere People, which documents the struggles of stateless people around the world.  His photo essays have been widely published and he has been the recipient of numerous international awards, including POYi and NPPA Best of Photojournalism.  In 2008 he received the SOPA Award for Feature Photography from the Society of Publishers in Asia, an Amnesty International Human Rights Press Award and the Harry Chapin Media Award for Photojournalism. In 2009, Greg was part of a team of journalists from the International Herald Tribune who received the Osborn Elliott Prize for Journalism on Asia presented annually by the Asia Society.  Most recently, Greg was a recipient of a 2009 Open Society Institute Distribution Grant.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken in a remote Dalit village in southern Nepal. It is part of my long-term project on stateless people, called Nowhere People.  Before 2007, some four million people in southern Nepal (in a region along the border called the Terai) had been denied Nepalese citizenship for generations.  After the monarchy was overthrown and in the creation of a ‘New Nepal’, some 2.6 million people in the Terai were finally issued Nepalese citizenship, yet hundreds of thousands of the poorest and most vulnerable found themselves excluded, primarily because of deep-rooted caste-based discrimination.  Large numbers of Dalit or ‘untouchables’ were among the people who were left behind.   While the Terai region is the breadbasket of Nepal, and while Dalit are the ones who primarily work the land in the Terai, little or no resources are allocated to the Dalit in the region.”

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Paolo Woods January 4, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iran.
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Tehran, 2009

Paolo Woods (b.1970) grew up in Italy and is now based in Paris. In 2003, he produced the book Un Monde de Brut (Seuil. Paris) about oil that involved working in Angola, Russia, Kazakhstan, Texas and Iraq. In 2004 he produced the book American Chaos, about the western involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2007/2008 he documented the rise of the Chinese in Africa. The book Chinafrica written with Serge Michel was published in France and has been translated in ten languages. He is presently working on a book about Iranian society to be published in 2010. His work has appeared in Time, Newsweek, le Monde, Geo and many other international publications. He has had solo exhibitions in France, Italy, Spain, Holland and Austria. Paolo received a World Press Photo award for his work in Iraq,  the “Alstom prize for Journalism” and was part of Open Society’s Moving Walls exhibit.

About the Photograph:

“Maryam, 33, is a single mother and painter. She teaches art and art history at a high school in Tehran. All her students are girls aged fourteen to eighteen. Girls today are cleverer than in my generation, she says. They know what they want and they demand their rights. She lets her students remove their headscarves in class and pushes the boundaries of the Islamic dress code. In most classes, models have to wear a headscarf and manteau (a sort of house coat).  I let them pose in a t-shirt and trousers. I got in a bit of trouble for it. Pictured here with her mother, Maryam is part of a close family. I have six brothers and sisters.  When my father died my brothers took over his hardware store. We spend all our free time together at my mother’s house. It’s good but it can get claustrophobic. For her mother, family is the most important thing.”

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