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Andrei Nacu September 4, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Romania.
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My Father. Iasi, Romania 2011

Andrei Nacu (b. 1984, Romania) recently graduated with an MA in Documentary Photography from the University of Wales, Newport and while studying for his BA at the University of Arts, Iasi he received an Erasmus scholarship to attend the Press and Editorial Photography course at Falmouth University. In 2013 he  was selected by The Photographers’ Gallery for the Fresh Faced+Wild Eyed exhibition and will be part of the Guernsey Photography Festival 2014. In his creative practice he is using family photography and archive photos to create stories which analyze the junction between personal memory and social history. Andrei is based in London.

About the Photograph:

“This picture is of my father in his apartment in Iasi that is part of my project In the Forsaken Garden Time is a Thief. The story is a subtle insight into a couple’s daily life in contemporary Romania. In examining their struggle to absorb and cope with some of the traumatic political and social shifts of the last 50 years, their relationship becomes an analogy for the disillusionment and dissatisfaction that marked these decades. The context, the environment that my parents are in and the history that they have been subjected to is really important and the challenge was to tell that story that is simultaneously personal but also general in relation with the social and political context.”

“Once, my father entered my room and he said: How can I explain this thing… may I sit for a bit? I wanted a little bit of rest… I don’t know how to explain to you the fatigue, I don’t know how you could explain to yourself the fatigue. There is a kind of fatigue that you could never explain, because you didn’t live those pieces of life that I have lived. But this is nothing… good night! I’m going to sleep. I don’t think that you could ever tell me that there is something beautiful as long as everything else is in dark. Not the beauty of the fact of being… May I go to sleep? Thank you very much!”