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Maysun March 19, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Syria.
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Missile attack in Saif Al Dawla district, Aleppo, Syria 2013

Maysun (b. 1980, Spain) has been covering political issues, social conflicts and natural disasters since 2005 She has freelanced for several NGO’s and national/international News Agencies such as EPA, AFP or ACN (Spain). Her work is distributed by Corbis. Her pictures have been published in TIME magazine, The New York Times, Lens Blog by NYT, National Geopraphic, Foreign Policy, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, Stern, Focus magazine, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, International Herald Tribune, ABC News, NBC News, Al Jazeera, El Pais, El Mundo, and CNN.

 About the Photograph:

“This photograph was taken in March 2013, in  the district of Saif Al Dawla, one of the neighborhoods  controlled by the FSA in Aleppo. I was trying to find Palestinians to continue my long term project To Exist is to Resist, about Palestinian identity around the world. After some months searching I found this Palestinian-Syrian woman, born in Aleppo but from Palestinian origins who was living alone with her three children in her half destroyed house. Her husband was living in a part of Aleppo controlled by the government. They didn’t see each other since the battle for Aleppo began years ago by then.”

“She was an elementary school teacher from a school in the neighborhood, but she couldn’t continue working since the war began. Her situation was very delicate because she wasn’t able to openly take any side. If she would have taken part for the rebels and renounced the government pension, she wouldn’t have a way to feed her children. If she had openly supported the regime, she might had been killed, as she was living in the rebel-controlled side. Aware of the situation, she was trying to keep a low profile. Despite the precarious situation of her house, half destroyed by regime strikes, and the requests to move anywhere else, from an FSA officer who helped and protected her, she preferred to stay where she was because it was her home and she had nowhere else to go.”