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Geoffrey Hiller | Annual Vacation July 19, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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#75 Bus: Hidden Portland 2015

Geoffrey Hiller: It’s that time of the year. I am taking a couple weeks off and will resume posting on September 7th. During the past seven and a half years Verve Photo has showcased almost 1,000 photographers. I won’t be sitting in the sun but working on my new local project in Portland. Happy summer to all. Stay cool. See you in September.

About the Photograph:

“This photo is part of my project called #75 Bus: Hidden Portland that focuses on a bus line that traverses Portland. It will feature stories and profiles about the people, places, landmarks and businesses along the route.

Marco Casino July 16, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Italy.
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Weight Room at the San Siro Racetrack in Milan, Italy, 2012

Marco Casino (b. 1986, Italy) studied Biomedical engineering before becoming a a photographer. In March 2012, he won the Leica Talent 24×36 contest with the series The Death of Italian Horse Racing. The same year he was nominated ambassador for Leica Camera in Italy and founded the commercial agency Made in Milan. In 2014  he was a recipient of the annual scholarship grant from the Lucie Foundation and won the PDN Award and the the first prize in the Short Feature category from World Press Photo Multimedia Contest. His pictures has been published in National Geographic Proof, D di Repubblica, CNN and Wired among others. Marco is based between Milan and Turin and is represented by the LUZ Photo Agency.

About the Photograph: 

“Dario Vargiu, one of the best Italian riders, in the weight room at the end of a morning training session. A jockey must weigh as little as possible to prevent handicaps during the race.​ This picture was made during the Italian horse racing general strike. All the 43 race courses were closed in 2011. In February 2012​ after more than a month of a strike the race tracks reopened to the public. The real risk is that a quaint and charming world might forever disappear. A world that is responsible for countless personal and family economic downfalls but at the same time inspired writers, painters, designers, directors, and fueled the dreams of many small owners and punters helping to explain and enhance Italy abroad.”

Yeong-Ung Yang July 13, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Bus Terminal Waiting Room. Sands Casino. Bethlehem, Pa 2013

Yeong-Ung Yang (b. 1984, South Korea) graduated from the Photojournalism & Documentary Photography Program at the International Center of Photography in New York City where he received the Rita K. Hilman Award. He was recently recognized as one of the 2015 PDN’s 30. Yeong-Ung completed an 2013 Emergency Fund Fellowship at the Magnum Foundation. His multimedia piece ‘Endless Bus Trip won Best of Show in the 2014 NPPA Northern Short Course Contest and Honorable Mention in the fourth Lumix Festival for Young Photojournalists. Yeong-Ung is based in New York City and his clients include the New York Times, Newsday, Corbis Image, Vogue Korea,and DAUM Media.

About the Photograph:

“Among thousands of people who ride the bus to the Sands Casino in Bethlehem, Pa, many of the patrons use the daily trips to make money by selling the free-play card that comes with each bus ride. The people who take the Chinese buses are from heavily Asian-populated neighborhoods mostly from Flushing, Chinatown and Brooklyn. They sell the gambling voucher worth 45 dollars in credit for 40 dollars cash. This earns them 25 dollars a trip subtracting the bus fare. Many of them go straight to the waiting room in the bus center without entering the casino fearing they may spend it inside the facility. In order to take the bus back home, they have to wait five hours. There is not much to do in a casino if your not gambling so most people sleep. I shot this image in the early stage of the project, and was surprised to see the waiting room packed with people all night long. Many of them sleep, some even play traditional Chinese board games or cards betting in coins.”

Jacob Russell July 8, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Iraq, Kurdistan.
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A Peshmerga soldier sleeps on the outskirts of the city of Kirkuk, Iraq 2014

Jacob Russell (b. 1984, United Kingdom) is a freelance photographer and journalist based in the Middle East. He works internationally focusing on the northern Iraqi Kurdish regionHis photographs have been published in the Guardian, the Times of London, Le Monde, Der Spiegel, USA Today and CNN, among others. His video work has appeared on NBC.com and Time.com and he has also published written work in  Al Jazeera English and Roads & Kingdoms. Jacob is also a regular contributor to Raw Music International covering stories that center on music around the world. He currently lives in Lebanon.

About the Photograph:

“In June last year I had been living in Iraqi Kurdistan for a year and a half when the Islamic State suddenly took Mosul and most of northern Iraq. While everyone who lived and worked in Iraq knew that the situation was coming to a boiling point, the speed and scope of IS’s advance was still shocking. The disputed areas of northern Iraq are claimed by both the Kurds and Baghdad, and when the Iraqi army collapsed and withdrew from these areas, the Kurdish Peshmerga rushed in gleefully. This photo was taken on a base outside Kirkuk, in the disputed areas, which had fallen into the Peshmerga’s hands a couple of weeks previously. A commander had come to the meet General Sherko, whose men occupied the base, and his escort took the opportunity to get half an hours sleep away from the merciless heat outside.”

“The year of conflict that has passed since then has changed the Peshmerga but at that point they were hardly a professional army. With little weaponry, training or fighting experience they were mostly young men with a lot of fighting spirit and not much else. Commander Sherko was killed some months later defending the same base from an Islamic State assault.”

Stan Raucher July 6, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Peru.
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Young Women Shaking Tambourines during Pentecost Celebrations. Loreto District of Peru, 2014

Stan Raucher (b.1948, United States) has been photographing people interacting with one another and their surroundings for the last ten years. His award-winning work has been published in LensWork, Adore Noir, Slate, Lenscratch, Black & White Magazine, The Daily Mail, Featureshoot, F-Stop Magazine, Camera Arts and Shots magazine. His prints have been shown in numerous solo and juried exhibitions around the world. He was a CDS/Honickman First Book Prize finalist in 2012, and Critical Mass finalist in 2012 and 2013. Before he began his photographic journey, Stan was a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Washington for over three decades.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from my  documentary project The New Promised Land. I took the photo on June 2014, in a small village located on the banks of the Amazon River in the Loreto District of Peru, during the Pentecost celebrations of Los Israelitas, an evangelical Christian group whose beliefs harken back to biblical times.”

“I first encountered this group in 2013, and they invited me to observe and photograph their religious services. During the celebrations, the priests prepare a burnt offering on an altar in front of their sanctuary, and the congregation gathers outside with a brass band playing and men praying on one side of the altar, and women and girls singing, dancing and shaking tambourines on the other side. I was move by the joyfulness of this celebration, but I wasn’t able to capture an image which adequately reflected that emotion during that year. I returned to the village again for five days in 2014, and I was fortunate to take this photo on the very last day of my trip. I went back again in June 2015 and brought the community both individual prints and copies of the LensWork article. I believe that for projects of this type, it is important to both go back repeatedly and to give back to the community.”

Sean Carroll July 2, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Grazing Buck, Yosemite National Park, California, 2013

Sean Carroll  (b. 1978, United States) is an artist working in photography and video raised in coastal Massachusetts now based in New York City. His works have been shown in exhibitions in New York, Detroit, Washington, DC, Northern Virginia, and North Carolina, including most recently, at Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts and Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art. His photos have been featured by PDN, Fraction Magazine, Ain’t Bad, and Lint Roller. He received an MFA in Photography from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and a BA in Visual Media from American University in Washington, DC.

About the Photograph:

“Yosemite Valley is one of the most visited natural sites in America. A lush river valley surrounded by dramatic waterfalls and sheer granite cliffs it attracts crowds of tourists to it’s famous vista points. To serve the visitors it is filled with a myriad of options for lodging, dining, transportation, and shopping. The diverse wildlife that call the valley home must coexist with the crowds and live within the shadows of hotels, parking lots, RVs, and gift shops. Late afternoon in September I came upon this male mule deer grazing in a small meadow in Yosemite Valley adjacent to the historic Ahwahnee Hotel and it’s bustling outdoor restaurant. For nearly an hour the deer enjoyed a late afternoon snack before slipping back into the forest as a steady stream of visitors, weary from the day’s adventures, made their observation of the wildlife.”