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David Pace June 22, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burkina Faso.
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Two Tailors Bereba, Burkina Faso 2008

David Pace (b. 1951, United States) received his MFA from San Jose State University in 1991. He has taught photography in universities throughout the San Francisco Bay Area for 25 years. As Resident Director of Santa Clara University’s study abroad program in West Africa from 2009 – 2013, David spent ten weeks each year in the small country of Burkina Faso, where he has been photographing annually since 2007. For nearly a decade he has been documenting daily life in Bereba, a remote village without electricity or running water. His images of rural West Africa have been exhibited internationally and have appeared in LensCulture, Slate Magazine, The Huffington Post, PDN, Wall Street International, r and the German magazines Camera and View. His work has been featured on NPR’s The Picture Show and the Art Photo Index (API). A monograph of his project Sur La Route was published by Blue Sky Books in the fall of 2014. He resides in Los Altos, California.

About the Photograph:

“One August afternoon as I was walking through the ancient market that wraps around the towering baobab tree at the heart of the village of Bereba, a hypnotic humming sound attracted my attention. I followed the sound to a squat, windowless, mud-brick building. Natural light streaming through the doorway illuminated the faces of two tailors laboring at worn treadle sewing machines in a dark, cramped room. The walls of the room were draped with colorful fabrics and articles of clothing. Scraps of cloth were strewn about. The temperature, normally around 100 degrees, was even higher in the tight, airless space. I stood, mesmerized by the heat, and the intense concentration of the tailors, until the tailor in the background paused and gestured, indicating that I should take their picture. The tailor in the foreground remained absorbed in his work and never once looked up.”

Chris Keulen July 22, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burkina Faso.
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Two exhausted cyclists at the end of the tour. Burkina Faso, 2000

Chris Keulen (b.1959, Netherlands) makes personal documentaries in the Netherlands and abroad, often in Africa. In 2001 Keulen received a World Press Photo first prize sport-series award for his cycling photos of the Tour du Faso. ‘Hot splinters of glass’; le tour d’Afrique, his photo book about cycling in Central Africa, was released in April 2008. Keulen’s work has been published worldwide.  He has exhibited  work from Burkina Faso, Congo DRC and his latest project on African cycling were shown at Visa Pour l’Image in Perpignan amoung other venues. Chris is represented by Hollandse Hoogte (Amsterdam), Panos (Londen) and Laif (Cologne).

About the Photograph:

“In 2000 I followed the cyclists for the first time through the Burkina Faso savannah. Cycling in 45 degrees, deficient equipment, meagre accommodation and hygiene.  The duration of the course didn’t interest me as much as the dream of the sportsmen who want to make something of their lives.  My respect grew with the day and I was spellbound by the passion for cycling. Between 2000 and 2006 I photographed the most important courses of Burkina Faso, Senegal, Cameroon and Eritrea.  Six thousand kilometres on roads that lead to nowhere, but which repeatedly arrived somewhere: in villages bursting with life.”

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