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T.J. Kirkpatrick February 12, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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The Spot Bar in Steubenville, Ohio 2012

T.J. Kirkpatrick (b. 1984, USA) is an independent photographer living in Washington, D.C. while working on long-term projects across the country. T.J.’s work is split between seeking the connections shared by different people and observing the quirks of American cultures. After receiving a degree in journalism from Boston University, he spent several years on the staff at various newspapers in New England. He has since worked throughout the U.S., in East Africa and Southeast Asia, and in 2009 was an intern for VII Photo Agency and a student at Eddie Adams Workshop XXII. His work has been recognized by the American Photography 28, 29 & 30 annuals, the International Photography Awards, and NPPA Best of Photojournalism, among others. T.J.’s clients include Esquire, Time Magazine, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

About the Photograph:

“This image is from the final weeks of the 2012 presidential election, when I based myself in Ohio to freelance for a variety of clients who had me running all across the state. I had already spent many months on-and-off of the campaign trail in various states in 2011 and 2012. Steubenville is a steel town on the Ohio River that has seen a steady population decline since many steel mills in the area closed in the 1980s. While I was there, Bloomberg contacted me looking for images of the campaign away from the candidates. I spent a day with volunteers for both the Obama and Romney campaigns covering their various phone bank and canvassing efforts, and another day at local hangouts like The Spot Bar making daily life features. Since it was expected that Ohio would be instrumental in picking the next president in the 2012 election, it felt like a good spot to place myself for the last couple of weeks before election day.”

“I spent a good deal of my time on the campaign trail trying to show the set-up, or, if you will, peaking behind the curtain to see the guy manipulating the wizard. Part of that effort involved meeting the people who were expected to buy into the show, and I got the sense that many of the locals were just worn out from the extended and aggressive campaign. The number of undecided voters in Ohio counties that had any chance of a swing were pretty small, but both campaigns had huge get-out-the-vote machines in place that caught up the deciders along with any voters who could be swayed. By the end of October it had all gotten a bit overwhelming, which is some of the feeling I tried to show with this bar scene from The Spot Bar in Steubenville, Ohio.

Teun Vouten February 9, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Honduras.
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Easter Week, Comayagua, Honduras 2008

Teun Voeten (b.1966, Netherlands) studied Cultural Anthropology and Philosophy. He has covered conflicts in Bosnia, Colombia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Gaza, Honduras, DR Congo, Mexico, Libya and Syria. His work has been published in Vanity Fair, Newsweek, The New Yorker and National Geographic. He also works for the UNHCR, Doctors without Borders and Human Rights Watch. In 1996, he published Tunnel People, an anthropological journalistic account of living for five months in an underground homeless community in New York. How de Body? Hope and Horror in Sierra Leone, was published in 2000. Teun has also contributed to the documentary Restrepo’. He is working on a PhD dissertation on extreme violence in warfare.

About the Photograph:

“After covering murder and mayhem for  more then a week in Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Honduras, I read in my tourist guide about the special Easter Parade in the picturesque town of Comayagua. The town is right between the San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa, the two epicenters of violence, but Comayagua is beautifully restored to its colonial splendor and is even a Unesco Heritage Site. For months, the Comayaguan’s prepare the Easter Week celebrations which culminate on Good Friday. All through the night before, people work non-stop to make incredibly beautiful carpets out of sawdust. These months of hard labor will be trampled the next morning when the Easter Procession parades through town. The most touching part is the children that play out the 14 Stations of the Cross. Dead serious, as if their lives depended on it.”

Jessica Todd Harper February 5, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Mary Ann, Marshall and Becky. USA 2012

Jessica Todd Harper (b. 1975, USA) spent hours of her childhood wandering around museums looking at depictions of interior and family life by painters such as Mary Cassatt, Vermeer, John Singer Sargent and John White Alexander. After a childhood of copying these masters with crayons and later pastels, she turned to photography and started looking at the families around her. The sold out “Interior Exposure” (Damiani 2008) won recognition from sources as varied as Oprah Magazine, PDN, and the Lucie Awards.  Her latest book “The Home Stage” was recently published and with many painterly references, looks at family life with young children. Jessica’s work is collected by museums and appears regularly in publications ranging from Die Zeit to Real Simple. She is represented by Rick Wester Fine Art.

About the Photograph:

“This is a portrait of my cousin, my sister, an ancestor from four  generations ago and my ketchup stained little boy. We were all gathered for cocktails and dinner at my uncle’s house, a space where the family members from the past simply take up a lot of wall space. So it is likely that wherever you are, there is a painting of an ancestor in the background. This photograph is part of my book The Home Stage, that explores the home environment and life with small children in my family and friends’ families. In this particular image of multiple generations, I am reminded how much our environments and the stories we hear about our families influence us. The ancestor in the painting, Mary Ann, is shown at the age of 16. Hers is a tragic story as she died in the Arctic, the biggest steamship disaster before the Titanic.  I grew up hearing about the adventures and tragedies of long ago family as if they were still with us.  And sometimes, as in this photograph, it is almost as if they are”.

Robbie McClaran February 2, 2015

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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From the project Hot Rod and Betties. Portland Oregon 2014

Robbie McClaran (b.1955) is a documentary photographer based in Portland Oregon. His work focuses on the American people and landscape. Robbie began his study in photography in 1975 at the Center for Photographic Studies with C.J. Pressma, and continued at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester NY, where he studied with Nathan Lyons. His commissioned work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Time, Smithsonian, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Sports Illustrated, Bloomberg and Forbes. The prints from his controversial 1996 book project, Angry White Men, are in the permanent collection of the University of Oregon. His personal work has been featured in Plazm, Photo District News, The Photo Review, ID Design, and has been recognized by the American Institute of Graphic Arts, American Photography, and Communication Arts. Robbie is represented by Redux Pictures.

About the Photograph:

“Most of my recent personal work has been large or medium format black & white film based projects that involved traveling to other parts of the country. I began to think about working closer to home on a series of short stories, one or two day projects working with a small camera in color. The first of these was on Hot Rod culture and I began with the Portland Roadster show. My idea was to juxtapose images of the cars with the people who are the car builders, collectors and fans. I’ve always had a little bit of gear head in me so not only did the show present a wonderfully colorful opportunity, it was a lot of fun.”

“Hot Rod culture is unapologetically macho and the women who are part of it are known as Betties. In an age of increasing concern over the impact of the automobile on the environment, hot rod culture continues to celebrate speed, chrome, oil, rubber and steel. It is quintessentially American for better or worse. The idea was to shoot fast and loose, not quite shoot from the hip but almost. So there’s a high failure rate working that way. But you also get these wonderful moments that would otherwise escape with a more deliberate approach. This image of the red haired young woman was made in the method described above, a fleeting moment in passing. So I was particularly pleased to see the resulting image.”

Geoffrey Hiller/ Daybreak in Myanmar Book Launch December 11, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Burma, Myanmar.
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Editor’s note: I’ll be out of the country this January in Myanmar and will resume showcasing new photographers on February 2, 2015. Hard to believe that Verve Photo has featured close to 1,000 photographers from over 80 countries during the past seven years. Happy New Year to all of you out there!


Listening to a transistor radio in a Yangon tea shop, Myanmar 2013

These images are from my new book Daybreak in Myanmar. I’ve returned to Burma several times since my first trip in 1987. The country was frozen in time until a few years ago when the government announced a democratic opening. Most of the visible economic and social changes have occurred in Yangon, but in the villages change is slower. On-going trouble in the border areas with ethnic minorities (including the Rohingya) continues to flare. The Burmese people know that there is still a lot of political uncertainty going forward.


Students near the university, Yangon 2012

The book is 192 pages with 170 color photographs printed on 157 gsm matte art paper. Trim size is 18.5 x 25.5 cm. It’s sequenced by time of day showing Burmese daily rhythms and includes six short interviews with leading Burmese writers and activists by UK journalist Francis Wade. Order a copy of the book here $29.95 + shipping. Thanks for supporting this project. By doing so you are supporting documentary photography and all of the work that has gone into creating Verve Photo.

 
River shrine, Hpa-an 2000

Vincent Catala December 8, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Brazil.
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Central do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro 2014

Vincent Catala (b. 1975, France) lives and works between Europe and Brazil. In 2000 he graduated from McGill University with a Masters Degree in Intellectual Property. He became a photographer in 2006 after having various jobs. Vincent often photographs for urban planning and architecture clients. He also does portraits for music labels and the press. Since 2012 he has been involved in a personal research focusing on the evolution of the city of Rio de Janeiro. His work has been the subject of various exhibitions in Paris, Amman, Los Angeles, Rio de Janeiro, Tbilisi, Braga and was awarded several prizes and has been published in Le Monde, Télérama and The Sunday Times Magazine. He is represented by Agence VU.

About the Photograph:

“This picture was taken in April 2014, next to the bus station Central do Brasil, in Centro. It was raining and this guy looked lost and a bit crazy. Normally I do my personal work with a large format camera, but in this situation I took the photograph with a 6×7 camera. It’s part of my current work about Rio de Janeiro because (contrary to what many people think) I feel there a lot of loneliness/emptiness here. There is probably in that vision a lot of my personal story, and this is why I always shape my work taking into consideration the space as well as the individuals, trying to extract from their interaction a common sense (place in the world, freedom). I love to work in Rio when the weather is gray and rainy (also because in color, when it’s sunny, the light proves often too harsh for me). There is no sadness in this kind of picture for me, rather a quest about oneself and the place surrounding us, searching a sense and an order.”

Elena Chernyshova December 4, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Russia.
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Norilsk , Russia 2012.

Elena Chernyshova (b.1981 USSR) is a self-taught photographer who after two years of work as an architect left her job and bicycled from Toulouse to Vladivostok and back again: 30,000 kilometers, 26 countries and 1,004 days. The trip led her to decide to become a photographer. In 2011 she received a grant from the Lagardère Foundation to create the photo documentary ‘Days of Night – Nights of Day’ about the daily life of the industrial city of Norilsk, located 400 kilometers north of the polar circle, in Siberia. Elena’s work has been published in National Geographic, Le Monde, Internazionale, Days Japan, A/R magazine, Newsweek Russia, and Ecology and Life. Her awards include: World Press Photo 2014; Days Japan Awards and others.

About the Photograph:

“I was attracted by this couple and wanted to do a photo without disturbing them but at the last moment the girl noticed me and glanced in my direction. We spoke a bit after. They were both born in Norilsk. Their parents came in the 1970’s, attracted by high salaries and economic advantages. They planned to work for five years and leave, but ended up staying. A typical Norilsk story. Now the young are dreaming of leaving Norilsk to build their own lives in other parts of Russia. There are no green areas in Norilsk so people have to travel 30 kilometers by bus and walk for about four  kilometers to reach nature.”

Pierfrancesco Celada December 1, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Japan.
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Shibuya Station, Tokyo 2011

Pierfrancesco Celada (b.1979, Italy) has a PhD in Bio Mechanics but is currently working as a freelance photographer. In 2011 he  interned at Magnum Photo and won the Ideastap and Magnum Photographic Award for his project Japan, I wish I knew your name, his current book project. Pierfrancesco’s work has been exhibited internationally and published in Newsweek, Times Lightbox, Amica, D-LaRepubblica. He is currently working on the second chapter of Modern Megalopolis: People Mountain People Sea about  life in Chinese Mega-cities.

About the Photograph:

“The Japanese megalopolis is a strip of land that stretches on the east side of Honshu Island through Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya and Tokyo. More then 80 million people live in close contact, making it one of the most densely populated regions in the world. This photo was shot outside Shibuya station in Tokyo, a few hundreds meters away from the well-known Shibuya crossing. Behind the glass is a smoking area where thousands of commuters stop for a cigarette. The space is narrow and the chances for interaction are high, but people choose not to interact.”

“My goal was to look at the difference between rural societies where people have more of an active role, with multiple connections and greater effect on the community compared to cities where people often struggle to communicate with each other. The aim of the project is trying to answer questions such as: Is it still important to be, or feel, part of a group? Are we alone in the crowd? My book project Hitoride is currently being featured on the crowd funding site indeastap”

Phil Moore November 27, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Congo, DR Congo.
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Congolese army soldiers celebrate immediately after recapturing the town of
Bunagana
from M23 rebels, DRC 2013

Phil Moore (b. 1982, U.K.) studied Computer Science at the University of Sheffield, specializing in Artificial Intelligence. Having worked for a year as a research associate in AI, and then three years as a web-designer in Paris, France, he set-out to make a career in photojournalism. His first work was covering the South Sudanese referendum for independence in 2011, and since then has covered the Arab Spring in Libya and Syria, the M23 rebellion in the DRC, and various elections across the African continent. He has worked extensively with Agence France-Presse (AFP), and contributes to magazines such as Der Spiegel and Vanity Fair (Italy), as well as daily newspapers, including the Times of London, the New York Times, the Guardian, Le Monde and Libération. He is currently based in Nairobi, Kenya, predominantly covering East Africa.

About the Photograph:

“I had been documenting the rise, and subsequent fall, of the M23 rebel group in eastern Congo since their inception in April 2012. The early days of the rebellion were marked by rapid advances and victories over what was seen as a demoralized and disorganized national army. In July last year, the tide shifted, and the army started recapturing rebel-territory, pushing them back to the hills around the Ugandan border. When I took this photograph on October 30, 2013, I was with an advance party of government soldiers as they retook Bunagana, the last rebel strong-hold.”

“The previous year, I had spent weeks in Bunagana as it shifted from government control to rebel hands, crossing the border every night to sleep in neighboring Uganda. The town—and its few hotels—had emptied due to the fighting. I remember a United Nations commander coming and telling the remaining townspeople that his troops would “never let Bunagana fall to the rebels”. Two months later, I stood in the same spot as M23 militia men milled around. It took fifteen months for the army to recapture it. On my early trips to Bunagana, it was very difficult to document the conflict. The government had formally prohibited journalists from crossing over into rebel territory, which we therefore did surreptitiously. I remember one morning, when the army had been caught off-guard by an early raid. They raised their rifle butts at me as they filed past, infuriated by the sight of my cameras documenting their defeat.”

“The soldiers recapturing Bunagana were a world away from this aggression that I had previously experienced. The group pictured above were part of a Chinese-trained group of commandos. They had recaptured the town maybe 45 minutes earlier, and were now singing and celebrating with break dancing and Karate demonstrations as gunshots rang out in the surrounding hills, all the while chanting ‘Commando Chinois!’ (Chinese commandos, in French.) The residents of Bunagana flooded back over the border from Uganda, where they had taken refuge. At first glance, this image is one of aggression: soldiers and fists. The expression of the guy on the ground is slightly ambiguous, but his fake cry was shrouded in delight of their victory.”

Joseph Vitone November 24, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Grandmother, Sandra Vitone; mother, Arathea Booth; and granddaughter, Elizabeth Dunn,
with pool and palm tree backdrop. Marshallville, Ohio 2009

Joseph Vitone (b.1954,USA) is a documentary fine art photographer and educator living in Austin, Texas. His work consists of large format portraiture and landscape in the United States as well as panoramic and other views examining cultures abroad. He is Professor at St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas where he has lived with his family since 1991. In 2001 he was a senior Fulbright scholar in fine art teaching and working on a photography project centered around small scale family based agriculture in Costa Rica. His work has been exhibited at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, Instituto Cultural Peruano-Norteamericano in Lima, Peru, Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, and the Houston Center for Photography in Texas. His work is held in a number of collections including the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Center for Creative Photography, the Museum of Fine Art, Houston, and the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History.

About the Photograph:

“Arathea’s mother, Sandra, is a creative person who loves putting together a good party. By profession a cook, a baker, and a caterer and by avocation a thrift store shopper, she supplements well-considered but inexpensive props with items gleaned from Goodwill and other second hand stores to assemble themed parties near birthday time of her daughter, Arathea. The annual events occur when Sandra is able to make a summer visit to Ohio from her residence in Austin, Texas. This year they are having a luau among the corn and soybean fields of Wayne County.”

Maija Tammi November 20, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Kyrgyzstan.
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Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 2013

Maija Tammi (b. 1985, Finland) is currently working on her doctoral thesis in photography at Aalto University. Her photographs and sculptures converse on topics around disgust, fear and abnormality. In 2011 she won the Fotofinlandia award (the largest photography award in Finland) and the Photojournalist of the Year 2010 award. Her work has been exhibited at Photographic Gallery Hippolyte in Helsinki and one at Gallerija Makina in Pula, Croatia and in group shows at the New York Photo Festival and at the gallery Bar Floreal in Paris. Her photographs have appeared in OjodePez and Polka magazines. Maija is member of the Finnish documentary photography collective 11. Her first book Leftover/Removals ( Kehrer Verlag) was recently published.

About the Photograph:

“The people in this photograph are hoping for someone to see them. It was made in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan in the spring 2013 while on assignment for the  Red Cross. These local people are looking for their long lost relatives. They are holding photos of their relatives for the videographer in the hope that someone will see their photographs. I was taking photos close to the cameraman and was misidentified as part of the Russian TV crew, although I am wearing a Red Cross badge. I had no way of correcting the mistake while they were filming. The people were pushing each other trying to get to the front of the crowd holding photographs of sons, daughters, brothers, mothers, and uncles. Most of the photos were decades old. One showed a niece, who moved to Kazakhstan when she was 21, another showing a husband’s brother, who left to find work in Uzbekistan over 20 years ago.”

Amanda Mustard November 17, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in China.
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Cheng Yun, 75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre. Nanjing, China 2012

Amanda Mustard (b. 1990, USA) is a freelance photojournalist based in Cairo. Born and raised on a Pennsylvania Christmas tree farm, she has worked on stories in Mid-East, China, and across Southeast Asia for Redux Pictures, Wonderful Machine, ZUMA Press, and Polaris Images. Amanda is a member of the Kōan Collective, Makeshift Magazine Editorial Board, and the Frontline Freelance Register Board. In 2013, she attended the New York Times Portfolio Review, Eddie Adams Workshop XXVI, and RISC (Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues) Training. She is one of Photo Boite and the Telegraph’s 30 Under 30 Women Photographers for 2014.

About the Photograph:

“This is a portrait of Cheng Yun, a 92 year old survivor of the 1937-38 Japanese invasion of China’s then-capital of Nanjing. In 2012, I began a Kickstarter-funded project to track down the few remaining survivors of the ‘Rape of Nanjing’, the 6-week occupation that claimed the lives of over 350,000 civilians, 80,000 of which were brutally raped. Cheng sat on his bed in an icy one-room flat in a slum that was, ironically, across the street from the multi-million dollar Nanjing Massacre Memorial complex. Surrounded by photos of his days as a military man in the Nationalist Army of the Republic of China, he divulged the true story of his past, only after learning that my good friend and translator’s grandfather escaped to Hong Kong when the Communist party took power. Unable to escape to Taiwan with his comrades, his subsequent refusal to tow the new party line landed him in a reeducation camp for eight years, and his pension and military merit were stripped from him. Today, he’s paraded as a ‘war hero’ by the party, but agrees to the public showings out of respect to the past, and in the hope he could somehow restore his standing.”

“Cheng took a risk that gave a whole new meaning to the project I had come to work on. Publishing his candid account of the current party’s faults could have had dire effects on him and his nephew, who was his only remaining family member and full time caretaker. In the meantime, I shared Cheng’s story with my Facebook friends and Kickstarter backers, asking for donations that could be given directly to him to help with his living costs and medical bills. In less than 24 hours, we received $1,100. Two years later, I found news that he had passed quietly in his sleep. Media reports surrounding his death are surreal, tailoring, omitting, and editing his statements to the point where his last words aren’t consistent. His suffering will never be easy for me to accept, but his perseverance and devotion to justice and the truth is something I will always carry with me both personally and as a journalist.”

Ramin Rahimian November 13, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in United States.
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Dancing Rabbit Eco-village. Rutledge, Missouri2009.

Ramin Rahimian (b. 1981, Iran) is an American freelance documentary and editorial photographer based in Petaluma, California, north of San Francisco. He received his B.A. in political science and international relations from the University of California, Berkeley. There, he worked on the photography staff of the student-run newspaper for four years. After college, he worked for two years as a staff photographer at the Minneapolis Star Tribune newspaper. Since 2006, he has been a freelance photographer working for clients such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Education Week, and San Francisco Magazine. He was named Utah photographer of the year in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Some of his work has been recognized by POY and NPPA Best of Photojournalism.

About the Photograph:

“Family members and members of Dancing Rabbit and the nearby Red Earth community celebrate the 60th birthday of Laird Schaub, left, a founding member of nearby Sandhill Farm community and husband of Dancing Rabbit member Ma’ikwe Schaub-Ludwig, in the new mercantile building at the Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage in Rutledge, Missouri, on Friday, October 23, 2009. Long time members of Dancing Rabbit, Alline Anderson and her husband Kurt Kessner have built the Milkweed Mercantile that will serve as a community general store, a bed and breakfast, and a center of education for all things Dancing Rabbit for the public.

Established in 1997 through a land trust, Dancing Rabbit is an eco village community located on 280 acres in rural northeastern Missouri. With over 50 visitors, residents, and full members and growing, Dancing Rabbit focuses on community values and strives to limit its impact on the environment by being ecologically and socially conscientious. As much as they can, Rabbits live sustainable lifestyles and strive to demonstrate that to society and inspire others to do the same. While food is bought in bulk from local businesses, the goal is to eventually grow the majority of their own food on the Dancing Rabbit land. Rabbits build their homes using alternative techniques such as straw bale, cob, and recycled building materials and produce electricity through solar and wind power.

This photograph was made during one of my two trips to Dancing Rabbit. It was a birthday celebration and dinner held in the the newly-built mercantile building. I saw it as a great opportunity to show warmth, friendship, and deep connections between not only Dancing Rabbit members, b-t members of other smaller nearby communities. I love this photograph because of each person’s expressions and mannerisms. There is warmth and a comfort that is conveyed by their ease. I felt very welcomed by everyone as they drank and drank bottles of wine that night. There was a relaxed hedonism going on that I think comes through.”

Vasantha Yogananthan November 10, 2014

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in France.
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Tina, Piémanson, France 2013

Vasantha Yogananthan (b. 1985, France) and lives and works in Paris, France. His work has been exhibited at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (Paris, 2012), the Musée Albert-Kahn (Boulogne-Billancourt (2013), and the Maison de l’Image Documentaire (Sète, 2014) among others. In 2013, he was selected for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. His photographs have been published in Le Monde, Geo and the New York Times. He was included in the “Top 30 under Thirty” organized by Magnum Photos. Along with his work as a photographer. Vasantha has co-founded a small publishing house named Chose Commune. His first Piémanson book was selected among the 12 finalists of MACK First Book Award and Best Book of the Year at Kassel PhotoBook Festival.

About the Photograph:

“The series “Piémanson” tells the story of the last wild beach in France. In the photograph you can see bed sheets from the hotel that have been cut to make flags on top of the caravan. Her parents first brought Tina to the beach when she was only one and over the years the place has become a second home for her. Every summer I came to Piémanson, I spent time with Tina and her brother and sister, following them in the hundred of activities children always find on the beach during summertime.”

“I took many portraits of her but I felt none was really conveying a sense of who she was. Maybe it was because I was too close, so I started taking a step back in terms of distance. 2013 was the last summer I took photographs for this project. After five summers living with this community I could no longer take pictures without repeating myself. It was the end of the season and people were starting to dismantle their camps. The atmosphere was heavy as every year campers leave without knowing whether they will be allowed to reinvent their enchanted interlude the following year. Tina was picking up her things on the top of the caravan and I immediately saw the whole scene as a perfect match to convey this feeling of melancholia. I carefully set my tripod, composed the frame and then shouted to ask her to stop moving which she did but not as long as the exposure. You can see her head slightly moving. Tina, like a princess in her kingdom, seems to be protecting Piémanson from her fortress.

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