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Angela Shoemaker May 25, 2011

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Holland, Ohio University.
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Nursing home, Amsterdam 2010

Angela Shoemaker (b. 1978, USA) is a freelance photographer based in Louisville, Kentucky. After pursuing a master’s degree at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication, Angela was awarded a Fulbright grant to complete a long-term documentary project in Amsterdam. The project focused on a nursing home for aging drug addicts. Some of her other work includes award winning projects on prison nurseries and families struggling with homelessness. She is currently in Kenya shooting video about underground music in overlooked corners of the world.

About the Photograph:

“While the United States was in the midst of the national health care debate, I was photographing a fringe element of the socialized health system in the Netherlands—the residents of a nursing home for aging drug addicts. The institution was tucked away at the outer edge of Amsterdam, thousands of miles from Washington, but the discussion remained about our medical system. The residents were perplexed by the issue and asked if it was true that Americans died because they had no access to health care. This was in comparison to their own health care, which allowed them to continue their unconventional lifestyles, consumed by drug abuse, without denying them access to the care they needed. I was there for several months shooting a documentary about the lives of these residents, some of who have been using heroin and crack cocaine for over 20 years.”

Alex Ten Napel October 6, 2010

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Holland.
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M. de Graaff, Amsterdam 1998

Alex Ten Napel (b. 1958, Holland) studied at the School for Photography in The Hague. His work is frequently published in Dutch and foreign magazines and newspapers. Photos from the Water Portraits series were selected for the Photographic Portrait Prize 2006, the National Portrait Gallery, London; Prix Photographique BMW-Paris Photo. He has exhibited his work in New York, Moscow, Paris and Miami. Alex is currently based in Amsterdam.

About the Photograph:

“I began this project about Alzheimer’s in 1996 wanting to show the way that it affects people’s personal life and manifests itself in the human face. The portraits were published in a book and shown in an exhibition on the walls of the hospital were they lived. When the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease has smashed the mask of identity, human existence is there right for you and you can see it in its face. To see the decay of the inner self so close moved me and inspired me to make the portraits. The woman in the picture is the same. There are two years in between. When life was hard for me during the project I used to visit her. A chat always cheered me up. “

Martin Roemers June 24, 2009

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Holland.
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Frederick Lennart Bentley, b.1924, England

Martin Roemers (b.1962, The Netherlands) received his formal training in photography at the Academy of Arts in Enschede (The Netherlands).  He has worked in Afghanistan, the Balkans, Russia,  Ukraine, Belarus, Mexico, Eritrea, Ruanda, Syria, India etc. The themes of Martin Roemers vary from the final days of production of the Trabant, the car symbol of the DDR, to portraits of people who were blinded as a result of World War II in “The Eyes of War”, and the deserted and guilty landscape of the Cold War in “Relics of the Cold War”. With his portraits of World War II veterans, he won a prize in World Press Photo 2006. A book of the project: ‘The Never-Ending War’,  was published  by QV publishers, The Netherlands. He is represented by Panos Pictures in the UK and Laif in Germany.

About the Photograph:

“This photograph of Frederick Lennart Bentley is from my project called The Never-Ending War: portraits and interviews of WWII veterans from Germany, Russia, UK, Poland, USA.”

“I was blinded by a German grenade during a night patrol near Caen in Normandy. My comrades left me behind. That was how it was: you didn’t help the wounded. You had to look after yourself. I managed to reach my own lines on my own. If the Germans had found me, they would have certainly shot me. You don’t give the wounded a bed, you bury them. I would have done the same myself. People who weren’t in the war can’t understand that. You’re living with death 24 hours a day. The war was over for me. I worked for 33 years at the Leyland factories as a mechanical engineer. I inspected machines by touch. I had work, I married and I had four children. I had a good life after the war.”

Andreas Meichsner August 18, 2008

Posted by Geoffrey Hiller in Holland.
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From the series “Arcadia ” , Holland

Berlin based photographer Andreas Meichsner has graduated from the University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Hanover Germany in 2006. His latest freelance works mainly deal with the status and organization of leisure time in our society and its relationship to everyday life in our society. He works on commercial and editorial assignments. Meichsner has reached the finals of the Leica Oskar Barnack Award twice in 2005 and 2006 with projections at the Rencontres in Arles. His work Arcadia has won the second prize at the European Architectural Photography Award and was selected for the Fringe Festival Voices-Off in Arles.

About the Photograph:

“The series shows tourists socializing in Dutch vacation house parks. The peoples search for tasks in their spare time, are shown in contrast to the architectural appearence of the parks. The decision to choose a standardized copy of their everyday home, lined up a hundred times next to each other, as their vacartion destination seems absurd. Nevertheless, holiday house tourism enjoys a growing popularity in Holland.”

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